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I'm looking for a nice way to sort a hash in Perl by value first and by key afterwards.

Example:

 my %userids = (
  williams => "Marketing",
  smith    => "Research",
  johnson  => "Research",
  jones    => "Marketing",
  brown    => "Marketing",
  davis    => "Research"
);

Output:

Marketing: brown
Marketing: jones
Marketing: williams
Research: davis
Research: johnson
Research: smith

Please note that value was the first sorting level. Second sorting level is key. Any idea how to do this in an elegant and high-performance way? Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Good reference: http://www.misc-perl-info.com/perl-sort.html#shv

#!/usr/bin/perl

my %userids = (
    williams => "Marketing",
    smith    => "Research",
    johnson  => "Research",
    jones    => "Marketing",
    brown    => "Marketing",
    davis    => "Research"
);

foreach (sort { ($userids{$a} cmp $userids{$b}) || ($a cmp $b) } keys %userids) 
{
    print "$_: $userids{$_}\n";
}
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I would like to add one more thing, use \L sequence in sorting.

From Perlfaq4: How do I sort a hash (optionally by value instead of key)?

To make our report order case-insensitive, we use the \L sequence in a double-quoted string to make everything lowercase. The sort() block then compares the lowercased values to determine in which order to put the keys.

foreach (sort { $userids{$a} cmp $userids{$b} or "\L$a" cmp "\L$b" )  {
    print "$_: $userids{$_}\n"; 
} 

Output :

brown: Marketing
jones: Marketing
williams: Marketing
davis: Research
Johnson: Research # here 'J'ohnson, J is in uppercase(taking assumption), come as fifth record
smith: Research

2.

foreach (sort { $userids{$a} cmp $userids{$b} or $a cmp $b )  {
    print "$_: $userids{$_}\n"; 
}

Output:

brown: Marketing
jones: Marketing
williams: Marketing
Johnson: Research # here it shifted to fourth record
davis: Research
smith: Research
share|improve this answer
    
I'd say that semantically that would only make sense when entering elements into the hash. Otherwise you will get inexplicable results when the hash contains both Johnson and johnson. I.e. when sorting you can hardly go and say 'keys are equivalent' - by traditional definition, hash tables can't contain two equivalent keys –  sehe Oct 17 '11 at 11:09
    
yes that's true keys will always be unique in hash, never contain two equivalent keys but you can see the difference in output. –  Nikhil Jain Oct 17 '11 at 13:26
    
I can see the difference in output. That's why I think it would be an odd thing to do: it violates the principle of least surprise in my view –  sehe Oct 17 '11 at 13:31
    
Rarely can happen but I thought would be nice to add it :) –  Nikhil Jain Oct 17 '11 at 13:34
    
+1 for good explanation and sample output –  Roney Jun 12 '13 at 4:43

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