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I'm looking for a way to produce a non-linear (preferably quadratic) curve, based on a 2D data set, for predictive purposes. Right now I'm using my own implementation of ordinary least squares (OLS) to produce a linear trend, but my trends are much more suited to a curve model. The data I'm analysing is system load over time.

Here's the equation that I'm using to produce my linear coefficients:

Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) formula

I've had a look at Math.NET Numerics and a few other libs, but they either provide interpolation instead of regression (which is of no use to me), or the code just doesn't work in some way.

Anyone know of any free open source libs or code samples that can produce the coefficients for such a curve?

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This is precisely the result I'm looking for: www3.wolframalpha.com/input/… –  Polynomial Oct 17 '11 at 10:04
    
Another q with links: stackoverflow.com/questions/882009/… A relevant-looking codeproject thing: codeproject.com/KB/recipes/QuadraticRegression.aspx –  AakashM Oct 17 '11 at 10:36
    
The former is a set of links to interpolation models, and the latter gives unusably incorrect / innacurate results, even after converting it to use decimal instead of double. –  Polynomial Oct 17 '11 at 10:50
    
bump any ideas? –  Polynomial Oct 18 '11 at 13:29
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4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted
+50

I used the MathNet.Iridium release because it is compatible with .NET 3.5 and VS2008. The method is based on the Vandermonde matrix. Then I created a class to hold my polynomial regression

using MathNet.Numerics.LinearAlgebra;

public class PolynomialRegression
{
    Vector x_data, y_data, coef;
    int order;

    public PolynomialRegression(Vector x_data, Vector y_data, int order)
    {
        if (x_data.Length != y_data.Length)
        {
            throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
        }
        this.x_data = x_data;
        this.y_data = y_data;
        this.order = order;
        int N = x_data.Length;
        Matrix A = new Matrix(N, order + 1);
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            A.SetRowVector( VandermondeRow(x_data[i]) , i);
        }

        // Least Squares of |y=A(x)*c| 
        //  tr(A)*y = tr(A)*A*c
        //  inv(tr(A)*A)*tr(A)*y = c
        Matrix At = Matrix.Transpose(A);
        Matrix y2 = new Matrix(y_data, N);
        coef = (At * A).Solve(At * y2).GetColumnVector(0);
    }

    Vector VandermondeRow(double x)
    {
        double[] row = new double[order + 1];
        for (int i = 0; i <= order; i++)
        {
            row[i] = Math.Pow(x, i);
        }
        return new Vector(row);
    }

    public double Fit(double x)
    {
        return Vector.ScalarProduct( VandermondeRow(x) , coef);
    }

    public int Order { get { return order; } }
    public Vector Coefficients { get { return coef; } }
    public Vector XData { get { return x_data; } }
    public Vector YData { get { return y_data; } }
}

which then I use it like this:

using MathNet.Numerics.LinearAlgebra;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Vector x_data = new Vector(new double[] { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 });
        Vector y_data = new Vector(new double[] { 1.0, 1.4, 1.6, 1.3, 0.9 });

        var poly = new PolynomialRegression(x_data, y_data, 2);

        Console.WriteLine("{0,6}{1,9}", "x", "y");
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            double x = (i * 0.5);
            double y = poly.Fit(x);

            Console.WriteLine("{0,6:F2}{1,9:F4}", x, y);
        }
    }
}

Calculated coefficients of [1,0.57,-0.15] with the output:

    x        y
 0.00   1.0000
 0.50   1.2475
 1.00   1.4200
 1.50   1.5175
 2.00   1.5400
 2.50   1.4875
 3.00   1.3600
 3.50   1.1575
 4.00   0.8800
 4.50   0.5275

Which matches the quadratic results from Wolfram Alpha. Quadratic Equation Quadratic Fit

Edit 1 To get to the fit you want try the following initialization for x_data and y_data:

Matrix points = new Matrix( new double[,] {  {  1, 82.96 }, 
               {  2, 86.23 }, {  3, 87.09 }, {  4, 84.28 }, 
               {  5, 83.69 }, {  6, 89.18 }, {  7, 85.71 }, 
               {  8, 85.05 }, {  9, 85.58 }, { 10, 86.95 }, 
               { 11, 87.95 }, { 12, 89.44 }, { 13, 93.47 } } );
Vector x_data = points.GetColumnVector(0);
Vector y_data = points.GetColumnVector(1);

which produces the following coefficients (from lowest power to highest)

Coef=[85.892,-0.5542,0.074990]
     x        y
  0.00  85.8920
  1.00  85.4127
  2.00  85.0835
  3.00  84.9043
  4.00  84.8750
  5.00  84.9957
  6.00  85.2664
  7.00  85.6871
  8.00  86.2577
  9.00  86.9783
 10.00  87.8490
 11.00  88.8695
 12.00  90.0401
 13.00  91.3607
 14.00  92.8312
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Solved my problem perfectly. Thanks :) –  Polynomial Nov 7 '11 at 16:14
3  
I optimized and upgraded your answer :) stackoverflow.com/a/12770686/1046374 –  KvanTTT Oct 7 '12 at 16:34
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I don't think you want non linear regression. Even if you are using a quadratic function, it is still called linear regression. What you want is called multivariate regression. If you want a quadratic you just add a x squared term to your dependent variables.

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Linear regression gives me a line. I've got no idea how to edit the equation I posted to do anything different. I want to get this kind of result: www3.wolframalpha.com/input/… –  Polynomial Nov 4 '11 at 0:14
    
    
Use the formula. But instead of x1 x2 use your x and x squared. If you still have problems I'll try and make an example calc in excel or pseudocode. –  Tim Nov 4 '11 at 0:37
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@ja72 code is pretty good. But I ported it on present version of Math.NET ( MathNet.Iridium is not supported now as I understand) and optimize both of code size and performance (Math.Pow function is not using in my soltution because of slow performance).

public class PolynominalRegression
{
    private int _order;
    private Vector<double> _coefs;

    public PolynominalRegression(DenseVector xData, DenseVector yData, int order)
    {
        _order = order;
        int n = xData.Count;

        var vandMatrix = new DenseMatrix(xData.Count, order + 1);
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            vandMatrix.SetRow(i, VandermondeRow(xData[i]));

        // var vandMatrixT = vandMatrix.Transpose();
        // 1 variant:
        //_coefs = (vandMatrixT * vandMatrix).Inverse() * vandMatrixT * yData;
        // 2 variant:
        //_coefs = (vandMatrixT * vandMatrix).LU().Solve(vandMatrixT * yData);
        // 3 variant (most fast I think. Possible LU decomposion also can be replaced with one triangular matrix):
        _coefs = vandMatrix.TransposeThisAndMultiply(vandMatrix).LU().Solve(TransposeAndMult(vandMatrix, yData));
    }

    private Vector<double> VandermondeRow(double x)
    {
        double[] result = new double[_order + 1];
        double mult = 1;
        for (int i = 0; i <= _order; i++)
        {
            result[i] = mult;
            mult *= x;
        }
        return new DenseVector(result);
    }

    private static DenseVector TransposeAndMult(Matrix m, Vector v)
    {
        var result = new DenseVector(m.ColumnCount);
        for (int j = 0; j < m.RowCount; j++)
            for (int i = 0; i < m.ColumnCount; i++)
                result[i] += m[j, i] * v[j];
        return result;
    }

    public double Calculate(double x)
    {
        return VandermondeRow(x) * _coefs;
    }
}

It's also available on github:gist.

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I would take a look at http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/53796.html to try get an idea about how it can be done.

Then this has a nice implementation that I think will help you.

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That implementation didn't work for me. It gave completely incorrect results (0/1/0 for the coeffs) out of the box and after some tweaking was still completely innacurate. Nothing like the Wolfram Alpha results I discovered earlier. The math in the link you provided is beyond me, unfortunately. –  Polynomial Oct 17 '11 at 10:52
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