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Suppose you had such code:

public Base
{
   abstract void Register();
}

public Registrator1: Base
{
   override void Register()
   {
      //uses the current state of the object to populate the UI captions
   }
}

public Registrator2: Base
{
   override void Register()
   {
      //uses the current state of the object to populate the UI captions
   }
}

But When you receive a new business rule asking you to write Registrator3 which actually registers based on some parameter and you change your code base to the next:

public Base
{
   abstract void Register(externalParam);
}

public Registrator1: Base
{
   override void Register(externalParam)
   {
      //uses the current state of the object to populate theUI
   }
}

public Registrator2: Base
{
   override void Register(externalParam)
   {
      //uses the current state of the object to populate the UI
   }
}

public Registrator3: Base
{
   override void Register(externalParam)
   {
     //uses a DDD - service passed in the params to populate the UI
   }
}

But Registrator1 and Registrator2 do not need that param and the code becomes smelly. What are the ways to re-write this code?

share|improve this question
    
if you mention oop you could add some virtuality for methods maybe. this looks like code smell "new method with the same name" currently. –  Valentin Kuzub Oct 17 '11 at 11:10
    
@Valentin Kuzub, done –  Yurii Hohan Oct 17 '11 at 11:11
    
still I got problems with this. Initially method has no params, meaning it is just manipulating state of object its called on. Its unclear what this Register is actually doing, thus its hard to think of flaws or better way. When we add an externalParam its like completely changes the whole picture, now registrator is acceping stuff and probably registering either parameters , or something else, based on those params, meaning its state is not enough anymore? Anyway I think if you want some good advice you could expand the question and show some pseudocode for registration functions for example. –  Valentin Kuzub Oct 17 '11 at 12:03
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use an object as a parameter here; which is commonly used in scenarios where the number of parameters can vary depending on the call being used.

struct RegistrationInfo
{
    public static readonly RegistrationInfo Empty = new RegistrationInfo();
    public string Username;
    public string CustomerName;
    public string Validity; 
}

abstract class Base
{
    public abstract void Register(RegistrationInfo info);
    // If you want to retain the paramaterless call:
    public void Register()
    {
         Register(RegistrationInfo.Empty);
    }
}

class Registrar1 : Base
{
    public override void Register(RegistrationInfo info)
    {
        if (info.Username == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("info.Username");
    }
}

class Registrar2 : Base
{
    public override void Register(RegistrationInfo info)
    {
        if (info.CustomerName == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("info.CustomerName");
    }
}

This has the advantage that you don't need to change method parameters (which is breaking interface) each time a parameter is added. The usage also becomes somewhat self-documenting:

var r = new Registrar1();
r.Register(new RegistrationInfo(){ Username = "JimJoe" });
r.Register(RegistrationInfo.Empty);

It's like air freshener for this type of code smell, while it's still smelly; you can make it smell nicer.

Finally you can make the call-site cleaner by making it a params argument (this has a small amount of overhead); in all honesty though it is more smelly because it's a language hack. Finally you could improve it with generics:

class RegistrationInfo
{

}

class RegistrationInfo1 : RegistrationInfo
{
    public string Arg;
}

class RegistrationInfo2 : RegistrationInfo
{
    public int Arg;
}

interface IBase<in TRegistration>
    where TRegistration : RegistrationInfo
{
    void Register(TRegistration registration);
}

class Base : IBase<RegistrationInfo>
{
    public void Register(RegistrationInfo registration)
    {

    }
}

class Registrar1 : IBase<RegistrationInfo1>
{
    public void Register(RegistrationInfo1 arg)
    {
    }
}

class Registrar2 : IBase<RegistrationInfo2>
{
    public void Register(RegistrationInfo2 arg)
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes, your solution is neat and nice, thank you. BUT - I do have a no(null) typed registration info 90% of the time and receiving a null as this parameter is not that nice. Although may be it is not solvable the other way –  Yurii Hohan Oct 17 '11 at 11:49
    
@Hohhi you could make a method on the base class the passes through null when called. –  Jonathan Dickinson Oct 17 '11 at 12:19
    
I cannot realy picture in my mind what you are saying –  Yurii Hohan Oct 17 '11 at 12:24
    
@Hohhi take a look at the new method in the first example. –  Jonathan Dickinson Oct 17 '11 at 12:32
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Is it not possible to contain the logic for externalParam in Registrator3? In other words, Registrator3 uses the param, then calls the unmodified parameterless base?

A lot really depends on where the logic belongs. If it is something intrinsic to the base, then put it in the base, and either overload the Register() function or supply a default value for the param so that sub classes don't need to provide it.

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Assuming you want to reuse the registration logic from the base class, you could update the code as follows:

public class Base
{
   public virtual void Register(object externalParam)
   {
       // base registration logic goes here
   }
}

public class Registrator1: Base
{
   public override void Register(object externalParam)
   {
       base.Register(null);
       // custom registration logic goes here
   }
}

public class Registrator2: Base
{
   public override void Register(object externalParam)
   {
       base.Register(null);
       // custom registration logic goes here
   }
}

public class Registrator3: Base
{
   public override void Register(object externalParam)
   {
       base.Register(externalParam);
       // custom registration logic goes here
   }
}

HTH,

Cosmin

EDIT: Updated code to compile.

share|improve this answer
1  
This code does not compile –  Yurii Hohan Oct 17 '11 at 11:40
    
I have updated the code. –  CosminB Oct 17 '11 at 14:00
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