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I have an IObservable<string> and several observers that handle strings based on some condition:

observable.Subscribe(s => { if (s.StartsWith("a")) {...} });
observable.Subscribe(s => { if (s.StartsWith("b")) {...} });
observable.Subscribe(s => { if (s.StartsWith("c")) {...} });
observable.Subscribe(s => { if (s.StartsWith("d")) {...} });
....

This is a simplified example (the condition is more complex and the observed events aren't strings) but you get the idea.

I'd like to have an IObserver<string> that catches all strings that are not handled by any other observer. Observers with different conditions (i.e.: StartsWith("e")) can be added at any time and the set of conditions does not overlap.

Is this scenario somehow supported? Or do I have to mark observed strings as handled and subscribe to unhandled strings once all other observers have tried (and how do I implement that)?

share|improve this question
    
Do you have to use multiple subscriptions? –  lonewolf Oct 17 '11 at 11:54
    
Yes, I have to use multiple subscriptions. Each subscriber is a self-contained class that's responsible for some other functionality as well. I'd like to keep that separated. –  Ronald Wildenberg Oct 17 '11 at 11:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I've got two approaches.

The first provides a way to chain together the predicate/action pairs to "syphon" off values that match. It follows the Rx operator style.

I can write this:

observable
    .Syphon(s => s.StartsWith("a"), s => { })
    .Syphon(s => s.StartsWith("b"), s => { })
    .Syphon(s => s.StartsWith("c"), s => { })
    .Syphon(s => s.StartsWith("d"), s => { })
    .Subscribe(s => { /* otherwise */ });

If I have this extension method:

public static IObservable<T> Syphon<T>(
    this IObservable<T> source,
    Func<T, bool> predicate,
    Action<T> action)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (predicate == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("predicate");
    if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
    return Observable.Create<T>(o =>
        source.Subscribe(
            t =>
            {
                if (predicate(t))
                {
                    action(t);
                }
                else
                {
                    o.OnNext(t);
                }
            },
            ex =>
                o.OnError(ex),
            () =>
                o.OnCompleted()));
}

It doesn't allow you to add and remove predicate/action pairs on the fly, but it is a fairly simple operator that might be useful.

To have the full add/remove functionality I have come up with this approach:

Func<Func<string, bool>, Action<string>, IDisposable> add;

observable
    .Syphon(out add)
    .Subscribe(s => { /* otherwise */ });

var startsWithA = add(s => s.StartsWith("a"), s => { /* a */ });
var startsWithB = add(s => s.StartsWith("b"), s => { /* b */ });
startsWithA.Dispose();
var startsWithC = add(s => s.StartsWith("c"), s => { /* c */ });
var startsWithD = add(s => s.StartsWith("d"), s => { /* d */ });
startsWithC.Dispose();
startsWithB.Dispose();
startsWithD.Dispose();

The .Syphon(out add) extension method overload allows the method to effectively return two results - the normal return value is the IObservable<T> and the second comes out as a Func<Func<T, bool>, Action<T>, IDisposable>. This second return value allows new predicate/action pairs to be added to the syphon operator and then removed by calling Dispose on the returned subscription - very Rx-ish.

Here's the extension method:

public static IObservable<T> Syphon<T>(
    this IObservable<T> source,
    out Func<Func<T, bool>, Action<T>, IDisposable> subscriber)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

    var pas = new List<Tuple<Func<T, bool>, Action<T>>>();

    subscriber = (p, a) =>
    {
        lock (pas)
        {
            var tuple = Tuple.Create(p, a);
            pas.Add(tuple);
            return Disposable.Create(() =>
            {
                lock (pas)
                {
                    pas.Remove(tuple);
                }
            });
        }
    };

    return Observable.Create<T>(o =>
        source.Subscribe(
            t =>
            {
                Action<T> a = null;
                lock (pas)
                {
                    var pa = pas.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Item1(t));
                    if (pa != null)
                    {
                        a = pa.Item2;
                    }
                }
                if (a != null)
                {
                    a(t);
                }
                else
                {
                    o.OnNext(t);
                }
            },
            ex =>
                o.OnError(ex),
            () =>
                o.OnCompleted()));
}

I tested the code with this:

var xs = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(0.2));

Func<Func<long, bool>, Action<long>, IDisposable> subscriber;
xs
    .Syphon(out subscriber)
    .Subscribe(x => Console.WriteLine(x));

var divBy3 = subscriber(
    x => x % 3 == 0,
    x => Console.WriteLine("divBy3"));

Thread.Sleep(2000);

var divBy2 = subscriber(
    x => x % 2 == 0,
    x => Console.WriteLine("divBy2"));

Thread.Sleep(2000);
divBy3.Dispose();
Thread.Sleep(2000);
divBy2.Dispose();
Thread.Sleep(10000);

And it produced:

divBy3
1
2
divBy3
4
5
divBy3
7
8
divBy3
divBy2
11
divBy3
13
divBy2
divBy3
divBy2
17
divBy3
19
divBy2
21
divBy2
23
divBy2
25
divBy2
27
divBy2
29
30
31
32
...

And that seemed right. Let me know if this solves it for you.

share|improve this answer
    
You might consider adding some error handling around the calls to the predicates. A peek at Where in Reflector shows that they wrap the call to the predicate in a try-catch that calls OnError if the predicate throws (but not if the OnNext throws, or presumably the siphoned action in this case). –  Gideon Engelberth Oct 17 '11 at 17:51
    
I think this is what I need. A very elaborate answer, thanks. I'm going to test this tomorrow and try to incorporate this into the actual code. –  Ronald Wildenberg Oct 17 '11 at 19:34
    
@GideonEngelberth - You're right. Some error handling would be good. Would just need a try/catch block on the OnNext lambda and call OnError on the observer for any errors that get caught. –  Enigmativity Oct 17 '11 at 22:15
    
@RonaldWildenberg - It's sounds like what you need. And I couldn't think of anything simpler to do what you want, yet be robust enough and fit into the Rx programming style. –  Enigmativity Oct 17 '11 at 22:16

One option is to make your subscribers to be observable as well. So what these subscribers does is if that they don't handle the value then they emit it through their observable interface and then the last subscriber (that handle all not used values) will be a single ton object that subscribes to each of the observable interface of the other subscribers. Something like:

public class MyObserver : IObserver<string>, IObservable<string>
{
    Subject<string> s = new Subject<string>();
    public MyObserver(IObserver<string> obs)
    {
        s.Subscribe(obs);
    }
    public void OnCompleted()
    { }
    public void OnError(Exception error)
    { }
    public void OnNext(string value)
    {
        //If condition matches then else dont do on next
        s.OnNext(value);
    }
    public IDisposable Subscribe(IObserver<string> observer)
    {
        return s.Subscribe(observer);
    }
}
public class LastObserver : IObserver<string>
{
    public void OnCompleted()
    {   }

    public void OnError(Exception error)
    { }

    public void OnNext(string value)
    { //Do something with not catched value
    }
}
static LastObserver obs = new LastObserver();
static void Main()
{
    var timer = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1)).Select(i => i.ToString());
    timer.Subscribe(new MyObserver(obs));
    timer.Subscribe(new MyObserver(obs));
    timer.Subscribe(new MyObserver(obs));

} 
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it's heading in the right direction. However, one potential problem I can see is that LastObserver will get called n times for each unhandled value, and n-1 times for the handled ones. –  Benjol Oct 17 '11 at 12:53
    
That is going to be a problem. I'd have to do some sort of distinct operator to make sure events are only handled once. –  Ronald Wildenberg Oct 17 '11 at 13:10
    
Hmm.. yeah you are right –  Ankur Oct 17 '11 at 15:40

I don't know of any out of the box way to do this but I would do it as under

class ConditionAction
{
     public Predicate<string> Condition {get; set; }
     public Action<string> Action {get; set; }
}

var conditions = new ConditionAction[]{action1, action2, action3};

foreach (var condition in conditions)
       observable.Where(condition.Condition).Subscribe(condition.Action);
.....
observable.Where(s=>!conditions.Any(c=>c.Condition(s))).Subscribe(...);
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea. However, it's pretty hard to externalize the conditions. Besides, this opens up the possibility for duplicate handling of events or ignoring events because I have to keep the list of conditions in sync with the observers, possibly leading to race conditions if I'm not very careful... –  Ronald Wildenberg Oct 17 '11 at 11:46

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