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I've been running the slow log on mysql due to production issues and the number one query is :

select * from feeditem feeditem0_ where feeditem0_.importance=0 and feeditem0_.company_id=N limit 21;

I've abbreviate the select (N is an id to a FK) as its generated from hibernate and its just selecting all fields in that table. When I do an mysql explain I get:

explain select * from feeditem feeditem0_ where feeditem0_.importance=0 and    feeditem0_.company_id=5045 limit 21 \G;;
*************************** 1. row ***************************
       id: 1
select_type: SIMPLE
    table: feeditem0_
     type: index_merge
possible_keys: FKF49961B13D5FD8EF,importance
      key: FKF49961B13D5FD8EF,importance
  key_len: 9,5
      ref: NULL
     rows: 2422
    Extra: Using intersect(FKF49961B13D5FD8EF,importance); Using where

There are about 850K rows in that table.

The schema is:

CREATE TABLE `feeditem` (
`DTYPE` varchar(31) NOT NULL,
`id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`dateCreated` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
`endSentance` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
`importance` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
`startSentance` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
`summary` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
`summaryComplete` bit(1) NOT NULL,
`targetId` bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,
`targetSentance` text,
`type` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
`hasRead` bit(1) DEFAULT NULL,
`teamProject_id` bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,
`user_id` bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,
`usertoread_id` bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,
`contentType` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
`company_id` bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,
`updated` int(1) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
`feedType` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
`extraInfo` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
`extraTargetId` bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY `FKF49961B1B74A2DA5` (`user_id`),  
KEY `FKF49961B17CE9E5EF` (`teamProject_id`),
KEY `FKF49961B137B7D1B4` (`usertoread_id`),
KEY `FKF49961B13D5FD8EF` (`company_id`),
KEY `importance` (`importance`),
KEY `dateCreated` (`dateCreated`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=956498 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

Is there any way I get stop the 2400 odd rows being scanned? This is the summary from the slow log (using mysqlsla):

Count         : 61  (53.98%)
Time          : 523 s total, 8.57377 s avg, 6 s to 19 s max  (54.03%)
95% of Time : 456 s total, 8 s avg, 6 s to 14 s max
Lock Time (s) : 0 total, 0 avg, 0 to 0 max  (0.00%)
95% of Lock : 0 total, 0 avg, 0 to 0 max
Rows sent     : 34 avg, 21 to 51 max  (38.69%)
Rows examined : 3.49k avg, 40 to 8.89k max  (0.00%)
Users         :100.00% (61) of query, 100.00% (113) of all users

thanks

UPDATE 1: I added another 2 col index (called feedquery) but it seems the optimizer chooses not to use the index:

mysql> explain select id from feeditem feeditem0_ where feeditem0_.importance=0 and    feeditem0_.company_id=5045  \G;
*************************** 1. row ***************************
       id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
    table: feeditem0_
     type: index_merge
possible_keys: FKF49961B13D5FD8EF,importance,feedquery
      key: FKF49961B13D5FD8EF,feedquery
  key_len: 9,14
      ref: NULL
     rows: 2753
    Extra: Using intersect(FKF49961B13D5FD8EF,feedquery); Using where; Using index

If I IGNORE the index:

 explain select id from feeditem feeditem0_ ignore index (FKF49961B13D5FD8EF) where feeditem0_.importance=0 and  feeditem0_.company_id=5045  \G;
 *************************** 1. row ***************************
       id: 1
 select_type: SIMPLE
    table: feeditem0_
     type: ref
 possible_keys: importance,feedquery
      key: feedquery
  key_len: 14
      ref: const,const
     rows: 8496
    Extra: Using where; Using index

The table:

CREATE TABLE `feeditem` (
.....
PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
KEY `FKF49961B1B74A2DA5` (`user_id`),
 KEY `FKF49961B17CE9E5EF` (`teamProject_id`),
KEY `FKF49961B137B7D1B4` (`usertoread_id`),
KEY `FKF49961B13D5FD8EF` (`company_id`),
KEY `importance` (`importance`),
KEY `dateCreated` (`dateCreated`),
KEY `feedquery` (`importance`,`company_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=999359 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 

UPDATE 2: @Salman A

SHOW profile;
+----------------------+----------+
| Status               | Duration |
+----------------------+----------+
| starting             | 0.000342 |
| checking permissions | 0.000024 |
| Opening tables       | 0.000053 |
| System lock          | 0.000027 |
| init                 | 0.000166 |
| optimizing           | 0.000068 |
| statistics           | 0.012869 |
| preparing            | 0.000202 |
| executing            | 0.000008 |
| Sending data         | 0.332767 |
| end                  | 0.000022 |
| query end            | 0.000009 |
| closing tables       | 0.000016 |
| freeing items        | 0.000040 |
| logging slow query   | 0.000005 |
| cleaning up          | 0.000014 |
+----------------------+----------+

ibdata1 is around 1.5 GB

share|improve this question
    
Can you post the results of SET profiling = 1; /* your query here*/; SHOW profile;. – Salman A Oct 18 '11 at 7:27
    
Also, what is the physical size of your table? A few MBs? or more? – Salman A Oct 18 '11 at 7:37
up vote 5 down vote accepted

A generic answer:

  1. Do not use SELECT * unless you absolutely need all columns. Select the columns you need only.
  2. Add an ORDER BY clause or LIMIT won't make too much sense.
  3. Create a composite (i.e. multi-column) index that covers
    • both importance and company_id
    • the field you want to ORDER BY, in the anticipated order
    • any additional fields you want the SELECT to return (in replacement of the *)

This way the DB engine can look up direct matches to your search with a single index seek operation and cover sorting as well as additional columns directly from the index. The index contains a copy of all columns it covers; if all requested data resides in the index, there is no need to go though the actual table. This will increase query efficiency.

Be aware that this is a speed-for-space exchange. Each column you add to the index will increase its physical size, so choose wisely.

EDIT 1: Also, an index has implications on the speed of write operations - INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE queries will be a bit slower due to index maintenance - in exchange for SELECT being faster. (thanks for the comment, @Thor84no)

EDIT 2: If this query is the main usage pattern for the table and the table does not change much (this point is very important!), you could think about creating a clustered index. A clustered index indicates the physical sorting of the base table, it does not exist besides the base table, like other indexes do. Every time you change the definition of the clustered index or add/remove rows "in-between" existing records, the actual data is re-ordered physically, i.e. on disk, an expensive operation you want to avoid.

Sometimes this could be a sensible thing to do, but in your case it's likely that it isn't. If your table is a log table of some sorts, keep the clustered index at the auto-incrementing ID.

share|improve this answer
    
Often the reduction in write performance is a bigger issue than the extra disc space taken up by an index, so I'd mention that as well. Otherwise very good answer. – Thor84no Oct 17 '11 at 12:11

A standard select x from y where z (which is what you have, just with multiple conditionals) is among the most efficient queries you can run. The only thing you could really add is an index incorporating all the columns you're querying on; this will however impact performance when writing to this table. (As well as a high one time hit to populate said index the first time).

If you know that one of the columns in your query will limit the results much more than the others you can make a compromise and only add an index on that query. E.g. if finding just the rows with company_id = x will guarantee you have only a few rows left to filter out then having the index on only that column might be preferable.

share|improve this answer

Basically, as each of your indexes only incorporate one of the two fields referenced inside your WHERE clause, the engine needs to fetch the records satisfying the first part and the records satisfying the second part (by using the indexes "importance" and "FKF49961B13D5FD8EF", respectively).

The easy rule to index generation is that you want an index to look exactly like the fields are in the WHERE clause. Therefor, you could create an index using "importance" and "company_id" in this order. This will select exactly the matching rows, and the 2.4k rows will not be scanned anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
that's what I (now) have but the optimizer seems to ignore it – wjp Oct 18 '11 at 10:52
    
Then my suggestion would be to now try the runtime using the INDEX HINT option of MySQL. – 0xCAFEBABE Oct 18 '11 at 11:03

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