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I have arrays with sizes from 1000 to 10000 (1k .. 10k). Each element is int64. My task is to find two smallest elements of the arrays, the minimum element and the minimum from the remaining.

I want to get fastest possible single-threaded code in C++ for Intel Core2 or Corei7 (cpu mode is 64 bit).

This function (getting the 2 smallest from array) is the hotspot, it is nested in two or three for loops with huge iteration count.

Current code is like:

int f()
{
    int best; // index of the minimum element
    int64 min_cost = 1LL << 61;
    int64 second_min_cost = 1LL << 62;
    for (int i = 1; i < width; i++) {
     int64 cost = get_ith_element_from_array(i); // it is inlined
     if (cost < min_cost) {
        best = i;
        second_min_cost = min_cost;
        min_cost = cost;
     } else if (cost < second_min_cost) {
        second_min_cost = cost;
     }
    }
    save_min_and_next(min_cost, best, second_min_cost);
}
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3  
You could initialise min_cost with the first entry in the array. I also noticed that you currently only iterate round the loop (width-1) times, which may not be the intended behaviour. –  qbert220 Oct 17 '11 at 12:06
1  
It would be even better to initialize min_cost and second_min_cost with the first two elements of the array, starting the loop at i=2. (That's assuming of course that the array has at least two elements.) –  David Hammen Oct 17 '11 at 12:22
2  
I think that a lot depends on what get_ith_element_from_array does. If it's actually accessing an array of size width, then you should be thinking about cache behavior (and in particular, if you're looping over 10k of memory millions of times, then there's probably some overlap, so the most important optimization might be to choose the best order for the 2 or 3 loops outside this one). If it's computing the value from i, then memory performance may well be completely irrelevant. –  Steve Jessop Oct 17 '11 at 12:24
    
Steve, 'get_ith_element_from_array' is the following: "return m[global_j][i] - n[i]" –  osgx Oct 17 '11 at 18:13
    
@osgx: So, if global_j varies between different runs of this inner loop then you would potentially get a good optimization by ensuring that runs with equal values of global_j occur consecutively. That way, m[global_j] will still be cached when you use it again. –  Steve Jessop Oct 18 '11 at 8:46

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make sure your array-reading is will-behaved so it doesn't introduce needless cache-misses.

This code should probably be very close to bandwidth-bound on modern CPU:s, assuming the array-reading is simple. You need to profile and/or calculate if it still seems to have any headroom for CPU optimizations.

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Look at partial_sort and nth_element

std::vector<int64_t> arr(10000); // large

std::partial_sort(arr.begin(), arr.begin()+2, arr.end());
// arr[0] and arr[1] are minimum two values

If you only wanted the second lowest value, nth_element is your guy

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clever, but not really fast.. –  duedl0r Oct 17 '11 at 12:13
1  
@duedl0rL did you benchmark that? Why is it 'not fast'? –  sehe Oct 17 '11 at 12:17
1  
+1, you're right, I misread the documentation. If thought it was O(n*log(n/2)), using this: (last-first)*log(middle-first). But middle is not n/2, but rather 2 in your case, which simplyfies to O(n). So your solution is optimal. –  duedl0r Oct 17 '11 at 12:25
    
@sehe: since he wants the two lowest values, I think partial_sort is better than nth_element as it will return the two in one shot. –  Matthieu M. Oct 17 '11 at 13:15
    
@MatthieuM.: I have read the question. However, I'm allowing for a little bit of XY-question wiggle room there. Who knows what the hotspot is actually doing? (Besides, I think I made it pretty clear from my answer) –  sehe Oct 17 '11 at 13:17

Try inverting the if:

if (cost < second_min_cost) 
{ 
    if (cost < min_cost) 
    { 
    } 
    else
    {
    }
} 

And you should probably initialize min_cost and second_min_cost with the same value, using the max value of int64 (or even better use the suggestion of qbert220)

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Nice suggestion. Assuming a well-shuffled set of values, this should speed things up by quite a bit. Worst case performance comes with an array that is sorted in exactly the wrong order, in which case this is no worse than the OPs code. –  David Hammen Oct 17 '11 at 12:29
    
@DavidHammen No, best case does 1/2 of the ifs, worst case does 2x ifs. In the end it balances. –  xanatos Oct 17 '11 at 12:31
    
You're right. Your suggestion fares worse in the worst case. –  David Hammen Oct 17 '11 at 12:34

Some small things (which may be happening already, but may be worth trying I guess).

  1. Unroll the loop slightly - say for example iterate in strides of 8 (i.e. cache line at a time), pre-fetch the next cache line in the body, then process the 8 items. To avoid lots of checks, ensure the end condition is a multiple of 8, and the left over items (less than 8) should be processed outside of the loop - unrolled...

  2. For the items of no interest, you are doing two checks in the body, may be you can trim to 1? i.e. if the cost is less than second_min, then check min as well - else no need to bother...

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"the left over items (less than 8) should be processed outside of the loop - unrolled..." - and Duff's device at the start! –  Steve Jessop Oct 17 '11 at 12:19
    
@Steve: I thought Duff's device (and manual unrolling) had been rendered obsolete by modern compilers :) ? –  Matthieu M. Oct 17 '11 at 13:13
    
@Matthieu: sometimes manual unrolling (with or without Duff) provides faster code than the optimizer, for a given benchmark or given practical use. What modern optimization technology has achieved is to make it so that you can't confidently predict whether it will help or not, which is about as good as it gets considering that there are always going to be pathological use cases to defeat particular optimization tactics. –  Steve Jessop Oct 17 '11 at 13:21
1  
Steve Jessop, As programmer who know a bit about compiler's inside i can say that Duff device is a nightmare to compiler, because it is very nonlinear (in control flow graph). Most compilers try to detect duff and roll them back to normal cycle. Even Xfree at some time replaced ALL duff's with simple loops. –  osgx Oct 17 '11 at 19:04

You'd better check second_min_cost first, since it is the only condition which requires to modify the result. This way, you'll get one branch, instead of 2, into your main loop. This should help quite a bit.

Other than that, there is very little to optimise, your are already close to optimal. Unrolling may help, but i doubt it will bring any significant advantage in this scenario.

So, it becomes :

int f()
{
    int best; // index of the minimum element
    int64 min_cost = 1LL << 61;
    int64 second_min_cost = 1LL << 62;
    for (int i = 1; i < width; i++) {
    int64 cost = get_ith_element_from_array(i); // it is inlined
    if (cost < second_min_cost)
    {
      if (cost < min_cost) 
      {
        best = i;
        second_min_cost = min_cost;
        min_cost = cost;
      } 
      else second_min_cost = cost;
    }
    save_min_and_next(min_cost, best, second_min_cost);
}
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What you have there, is O(n) and optimal for random data. That means, you already have the fastest.

The only way you can improve this is by giving certain properties to your array, for example, keeping it sorted at all times or by making it a heap.

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5  
the OP is clearly interested in optimization within the O(n) bound, 5*n ops and 10*n ops are both O(n), but one is clearly faster then the other. The simple big O notation analyzis seems to be not enough here. –  amit Oct 17 '11 at 12:05

The good point is that your algorithm scans the numbers once. You're optimal.

An important source of slowness could come from the way your elements are arranged. If they are in an array, I mean a C array (or C++ vector) where all the elements are contiguous and you scan them forward, then memory-wise you're optimal too. Otherwise, you could have some surprises. For instance, if your elements are in a linked list, or scatter gathered, then you can have penalty for memory accesses.

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