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validates_format_of            :order_of_importance, :on => :create, :with => /^[1-3]{3}$/,
                             :message => "Order of Importance must have 3 Digits"

Right now I have it validating that the numbers used are either 1, 2, 3, but I want to also make sure that those numbers are not only used, but that each one is used only once.

For example:

Should be working numbers

2 3 1

1 3 2

1 2 3

Should not be working numbers:

1 1 2

2 2 1

3 3 3

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Is there a specific reason you want to use regex? I'd use a method. –  Dave Newton Oct 17 '11 at 12:17
    
No specific reason. It's just what I started with. I guess this getting to the point where a method is more essential. That being the case, how would you compose the method? –  Trip Oct 17 '11 at 12:19
1  
Honestly, I'd probably just do a uniq! and see if it's the same size as the original. I'm kind of lazy sometimes. (Assuming they're in an array.) Could also dump them into a map and compare array/map sizes. –  Dave Newton Oct 17 '11 at 12:22
1  
agree with Dave this task can be easily solved with sth like str.split('').uniq.length == 3 and it's hard to find an appropriate regexp –  Bohdan Oct 17 '11 at 13:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Isn't it easier to check against all 3! valid permutations?

Edit:

But to take you up on the challenge: (?:1(?!\d*1)|2(?!\d*2)|3(?!\d*3)){3}

It uses negative lookaheads to make sure numbers are picked only once.

Edit:

Checked with rubular.com.

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if subject =~ /\A(?:\A(?=[1-3]{3}\Z)(\d)(?!\1)(\d)(?!(?:\1|\2))\d\Z)\Z/
    # Successful match
else
    # Match attempt failed
end

This will match a string with exactly 3 numbers in the range 1-3 without duplicate numbers.

Breakdown :

"
^              # Assert position at the beginning of the string
(?=            # Assert that the regex below can be matched, starting at this position (positive lookahead)
   [1-3]          # Match a single character in the range between “1” and “3”
      {3}            # Exactly 3 times
   \$              # Assert position at the end of the string (or before the line break at the end of the string, if any)
)
(              # Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 1
   \\d             # Match a single digit 0..9
)
(?!            # Assert that it is impossible to match the regex below starting at this position (negative lookahead)
   \\1             # Match the same text as most recently matched by capturing group number 1
)
(              # Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 2
   \\d             # Match a single digit 0..9
)
(?!            # Assert that it is impossible to match the regex below starting at this position (negative lookahead)
   (?:            # Match the regular expression below
                     # Match either the regular expression below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails)
         \\1             # Match the same text as most recently matched by capturing group number 1
      |              # Or match regular expression number 2 below (the entire group fails if this one fails to match)
         \\2             # Match the same text as most recently matched by capturing group number 2
   )
)
\\d             # Match a single digit 0..9
\$              # Assert position at the end of the string (or before the line break at the end of the string, if any)
"
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you may break the string down into 3 numbers. a, b and c.

then you have many ways to check. e.g.

min val ==1 and max==3 and sum=6

put the 3 into a set(i hope ruby has the set collection type), the size of the set should be 3.

etc..

regex may not the best tool to solve this.

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As others already said, it is better to check for uniqueness using a method or something. But if you have a reason to use a regex, then the regex would look something like this

^(\d)\s*(?!\1)(\d)\s*(?!\1|\2)(\d)$

It uses negative lookahead at each of the digits to validate the repetition by checking aginst the already captured groups. If you have to check only for 1,2 and 3 then you can use this

^([123])\s*(?!\1)([123])\s*(?!\1|\2)([123])$
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I would strongly recommend [Online Regular Expression Builder][1]

[1]: http://www.gskinner.com/RegExr/ to avoid doubts

share|improve this answer
    
Not really an answer. –  Dave Newton Oct 17 '11 at 12:35
1  
oops, Apologies Dave, but maybe helpful to QO in a way –  defau1t Oct 17 '11 at 12:38
    
Agreed, but more appropriate as a comment. –  Dave Newton Oct 17 '11 at 12:39

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