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In a previous similar question, I asked about, how to serialise two different sets of fields using JacksonJson and Spring.

My use case is the typical Controller mapping with @ResponseBody annotation returning directly a particular object or collections of objects, that are then rendered with JacksonJson whenever the client adds application/json in the Accept header.

I had two answers, the first one suggests to return different interfaces with a different getter list, the second suggests to use Json Views.

I don't have problems to understand the first way, however, for the second, after reading the documentation on JacksonJsonViews, I don't know how to implement it with Spring.

To stay with the example, I would declare three stub classes, inside the class Views:

// View definitions:
public class Views {
    public static class Public { }
    public static class ExtendedPublic extends PublicView { }
    public static class Internal extends ExtendedPublicView { }
}

Then I've to declare the classes mentioned:

public class PublicView { }   
public class ExtendedPublicView { }

Why on earth they declare empty static classes and external empty classes, I don't know. I understand that they need a "label", but then the static members of Views would be enough. And it's not that ExtendedPublic extends Public, as it would be logical, but they are in fact totally unrelated.

And finally the bean will specify with annotation the view or list of views:

//changed other classes to String for simplicity and fixed typo 
//in classname, the values are hardcoded, just for testing
public class Bean {
    // Name is public
    @JsonView(Views.Public.class)
    String name = "just testing";

    // Address semi-public
    @JsonView(Views.ExtendedPublic.class)
    String address = "address";

    // SSN only for internal usage
    @JsonView(Views.Internal.class)
    String ssn = "32342342";
}

Finally in the Spring Controller, I've to think how to change the original mapping of my test bean:

@RequestMapping(value = "/bean") 
@ResponseBody
public final Bean getBean() {
    return new Bean();
}

It says to call:

//or, starting with 1.5, more convenient (ObjectWriter is reusable too)
objectMapper.viewWriter(ViewsPublic.class).writeValue(out, beanInstance);

So I have an ObjectMapper instance coming out of nowhere and an out which is not the servlet typical PrintWriter out = response.getWriter();, but is an instance of JsonGenerator and that can't be obtained with the new operator. So I don't know how to modify the method, here is an incomplete try:

@RequestMapping(value = "/bean")
@ResponseBody
public final Bean getBean() throws JsonGenerationException, JsonMappingException, IOException {
    ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();
    JsonGenerator out; //how to create?
    objectMapper.viewWriter(Views.Public.class).writeValue(out, new Bean());
    return ??; //what should I return?
}

So I would like to know if anybody had success using JsonView with Spring and how he/she did. The whole concept seems interesting, but the documentation seems lacking, also the example code is missing.

If it's not possible I will just use interfaces extending each others. Sorry for the long question.

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1  
Why are you trying to do the JSON yourself? The HttpMessageConverter that are setup to use Jackson should convert it automatically. –  chrislovecnm Oct 17 '11 at 20:37
    
@chrislovecnm, in my simple example, I simply return the Object or Collection with ResponseBody annotation and Spring does all "behind the scenes". And here is the problem, since it does it "secretly", I don't know how to pass it parameters (in my case the Views.Public.class) to change its behaviour. –  stivlo Oct 18 '11 at 1:26

3 Answers 3

Based on the answers by @igbopie and @chrislovecnm, I've put together an annotation driven solution:

@Controller
public class BookService
{
    @RequestMapping("/books")
    @ResponseView(SummaryView.class)
    public @ResponseBody List<Book> getBookSummaries() {}

    @RequestMapping("/books/{bookId}")
    public @ResponseBody Book getBook(@PathVariable("bookId") Long BookId) {}
}

Where SummaryView is annotated on the Book model like so:

@Data
class Book extends BaseEntity
{
    @JsonView(SummaryView.class)
    private String title;
    @JsonView(SummaryView.class)
    private String author;
    private String review;

    public static interface SummaryView extends BaseView {}
}

@Data
public class BaseEntity
{
    @JsonView(BaseView.class)
    private Long id;    
}

public interface BaseView {}

A custom HandlerMethodReturnValueHandler is then wired into Spring MVC's context to detect the @ResponseView annotation, and apply the Jackson view accordingly.

I've supplied full code over on my blog.

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Nice solution! The annotation driven solution looks really neat. –  igbopie Aug 1 '13 at 11:16
1  
This is a great solution, however I didn't want to annotate every field in every class to exclude just a couple of fields. So I extended your annotation approach with @ResponseMixinFilters which provides 2 arrays (entities and filter classes) and then do mapper.getSerializationConfig().addMixInAnnotations(entity,filter) in ViewAndFilterAwareJsonMessageConverter. –  Federico Aug 2 '13 at 16:21

You need to manually wire in the MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter. In spring 3.1 you are able to use the mvc xml tags like the following:

<mvc:annotation-driven >
    <mvc:message-converter>
        <bean class="org.springframework.http.converter.json.MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter" />
    </mvc:message-converters>
</mvc:annotation-driven>

It is pretty ugly to not use spring 3.1, it will save you about 20 lines of xml. The mvc:annotation tag does ALOT.

You will need to wire in the object mapper with the correct view writer. I have noticed recently the using a @Configuration class can make complicated wiring like this a lot easier. Use a @Configuration class and create a @Bean with your MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter, and wire the reference to that bean instead of the MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter above.

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Thank you Chris for your answer. However, I'm very far from understanding what I should do. I am using Spring 3.0.6 and I'm already using mvc:annotation-driven, I've added mvc:message-converter as suggested. However, I get "Element 'mvc:annotation-driven' must have no character or element information item [children], because the type's content type is empty." Then you say "wire the object mapper with the correct view writer", this probably mean a call similar to this: objectMapper.viewWriter(Views.Public.class) and I don't know where and how to obtain a reference to objectMapper. –  stivlo Oct 18 '11 at 11:28
    
Then what you say with "I have noticed ..." is it an alternative solution? In practice the bean will be autowired by the AOP @Configuration tag, with a MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter, and I name the variable as I like an Spring will find it? Then I've to tell something about the views, how to do? And how to differentiate them? I've to set something in every object? –  stivlo Oct 18 '11 at 11:30
1  
@stivlo you need to use Spring 3.1 to use the mvc:message-converter tag. Also I am not familiar JacksonJsonViews ... –  chrislovecnm Oct 18 '11 at 13:49
    
Thank you Chris, so I will try later again to experiment on this area... for now I will simply return all properties, since I've some other urgent services to deliver. In case I discover something later, I will share. –  stivlo Oct 18 '11 at 14:49
    
Thanks a lot Chris! I had a very similar problem and your suggestion solved it. Ain't spring grand... –  Ittai Mar 21 '12 at 7:46

I've manage to solve the problem this way:

  • Create custom abstract class to contain the json response object:
public abstract AbstractJson<E>{
    @JsonView(Views.Public.class)
    private E responseObject;

    public E getResponseObject() {
        return responseObject;
    }
    public void setResponseObject(E responseObject) {
        this.responseObject = responseObject;
    }
}
  • Create a class for each visibility (just to mark the response):
public class PublicJson<E> extends AbstractJson<E> {}
public class ExtendedPublicJson<E> extends AbstractJson<E> {}
public class InternalJson<E> extends AbstractJson<E> {}
  • Change your method declaration:
    @RequestMapping(value = "/bean")
    @ResponseBody
    public final PublicJson<Bean> getBean() throws JsonGenerationException, JsonMappingException, IOException {
         return new PublicJson(new Bean());
    }
  • Create customs MessageConverter:
public class PublicJsonMessageConverter extends MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter{

    public PublicApiResponseMessageConverter(){
        super();
        org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper objMapper=new org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper();
        objMapper.configure(SerializationConfig.Feature.DEFAULT_VIEW_INCLUSION, false);
        objMapper.setSerializationConfig(objMapper.getSerializationConfig().withView(Views.Public.class));
        this.setObjectMapper(objMapper);
    }

     public boolean canWrite(Class<?> clazz, MediaType mediaType) {
         if(clazz.equals(PublicJson.class)){
             return true;
         }
         return false;
     }

}

public class ExtendedPublicJsonMessageConverter extends MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter{

    public ExtendedPublicJsonMessageConverter(){
        super();
        org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper objMapper=new org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper();
        objMapper.configure(SerializationConfig.Feature.DEFAULT_VIEW_INCLUSION, false);
        objMapper.setSerializationConfig(objMapper.getSerializationConfig().withView(Views.ExtendedPublic.class));
        this.setObjectMapper(objMapper);
    }

     public boolean canWrite(Class<?> clazz, MediaType mediaType) {
         if(clazz.equals(ExtendedPublicJson.class)){
             return true;
         }
         return false;
     }

}

public class InternalJsonMessageConverter extends MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter{

    public InternalJsonMessageConverter(){
        super();
        org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper objMapper=new org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper();
        objMapper.configure(SerializationConfig.Feature.DEFAULT_VIEW_INCLUSION, false);
        objMapper.setSerializationConfig(objMapper.getSerializationConfig().withView(Views.Internal.class));
        this.setObjectMapper(objMapper);
    }

     public boolean canWrite(Class<?> clazz, MediaType mediaType) {
         if(clazz.equals(Internal.class)){
             return true;
         }
         return false;
     }

}
  • Add the following to your xml:
<mvc:annotation-driven>
    <mvc:message-converters>
        <bean class="PublicJsonMessageConverter"></bean>
        <bean class="ExtendedPublicJsonMessageConverter"></bean>
        <bean class="InternalJsonMessageConverter"></bean>
    </mvc:message-converters>
</mvc:annotation-driven>

That's it! I had to update to spring 3.1 but that's all. I use the responseObject to send more info about the json call but you can override more methods of the MessageConverter to be completely transparent. I hope someday spring include an annotation for this.

Hope this helps!

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