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As the title says, I am wondering what the best practice is regarding the throwing of NullPointerExceptions. Specifically, if I have an external library function that can return null in circumstances that I don't want to actually handle (see below for a specific example), as the null indicates a problem with the software. The question is, should I

  1. check the return value for null and throw the NullPointerException myself, or
  2. should I just let Java do the dirty work for me as soon as I try to use the object.

The first approach lets me add some additional information, since I get to construct the NullPointerException, but the second makes for cleaner code in my opinion. I would also wonder as to any performance implications, that is, is Java more efficient at throwing the NPE "natively"?

By way of example, I am trying to use the Java Speech API to create a speech synthesizer using the following code:

synthesizer = Central.createSynthesizer(generalDesc);

if (synthesizer == null) {
    // (1) throw NPE explicitly
    throw new NullPointerException("No general domain synthesizer found.");
}

// (2) let the JVM throw the NPE when dereferencing
synthesizer.allocate();

Central.createSynthesizer returns null if it cannot find a suitable synthesizer, which is most often caused by a missing speech.properties file. So it's a matter of wrong setup of the system, and pretty unrecoverable from at runtime, rather than circumstances that need to be handled programmatically. As such, I believe throwing a NullPointerException is a valid response, since it indicates a bug (not in the code but in the deployment of the software). But since the synthesizer object is dereferenced in the very next statement, should I just let the JVM throw the NPE for me and save the null check?

Addendum: Considering that speech.properties gets loaded when the JVM starts needs to exist on the filesystem in (normally) "user.home" or "java.home/lib", it is puzzling that createSynthesizer doesn't straight up throw an NPE (which is what I had written originally in a Freudian slip) when it fails to find it but returns null instead. I think that throwing a NullPointerException is the right thing to do here, because it indicates an actual bug in the deployment of the software.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In your case: neither. Check for null and throw more meaningful exception, not NPE.

In general - if NPE should not occur, don't test for it explicitly, Java will do it for you. Less tests to write, less code to read, less complexity to analyze.

However if null is expected test it as soon as possible and interpret accordingly. Otherwise NullPointerException will occur somewhere later in different line/method, making it harder to debug the real problem.

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I accepted this answer because of the reasoning behind it. It is, of course, best practice to throw the exception as soon as possible though an IllegalStateException might be the more appropriate exception to throw. However, if someone has a compelling answer as to cases in which I shouldn't handle this at all (e.g. because it indicates a bug and you shouldn't write code for handling a bug but rather fix the bug), I am willing to change my answer :) –  ThomasH Oct 17 '11 at 15:23
    
+1 for "throw more meaningful exception, not NPE." –  Burhan Ali Oct 19 '11 at 17:49
    
@ThomasH I would not recommend an IllegalStateException. The whole point of checking your parameters before doing anything else is to prevent the state of the object from being modified. IllegalStateException should be when the object has moved itself to a state that it should not have. By validating your input before modifying the state, you would prevent illegal states from happening. Instead, I would recommend IllegalArgumentException. –  corsiKa Oct 21 '11 at 5:40
    
@glowcoder The object has indeed moved itself to a state that it should not have. The method returns null not because of a wrong parameter but because it cannot find an underlying speech synthesizer engine on the host system. This only happens if the engine has not been installed correctly in the first place and is a factor external to my code. It's probably most similar to a call to a native library, when the library isn't installed correctly. –  ThomasH Oct 21 '11 at 13:51
    
@Thomas ah, yes. That was a poor decision on the implementer of the library. –  corsiKa Oct 21 '11 at 14:37
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I'd say that you should never explicitly create a NullPointerException and instead use an exception type that more clearly describes the situation. In your case, I'd say IllegalStateException would fit the situation "wrong setup of the system, and pretty unrecoverable from at runtime". Or you could create your own ComponentMissingException. In cases where a required method parameter is null, IllegalArgumentException is typically used.

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"In cases where a required method parameter is null, IllegalArgumentException is typically used": having a NullArgumentException extending IllegalArgumentException available in the language would have been more intuitive, in my opinion. –  Mister Smith Oct 17 '11 at 14:03
    
The method parameters are fine. Java's Central class looks for the speech.properties file in "user.home" or "java.home/lib" instead of getting the location from a parameter. This is usually done as part of installing a speech engine, so it really is a matter of deployment. IllegalStateException would indeed probably be appropriate though I also want to see what the consensus is on dealing with the occurrence of it in the first place. Throwing an IllegalStateException is handling it, in my opinion, since I would have to actively code for it rather than just letting the JVM throw the NPE. –  ThomasH Oct 17 '11 at 15:01
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I dont like having null be a valid return value, even in "exceptional circumstances". So I take yet another approach.

In your case I'd annotate the method createSynthesizer(...) with @NotNull (@NotNull is an amazing annotation). Instead of an NPE, I'd get an IllegalStateException as soon as createSynthesizer(...) would want to return null.

You'd get a:

java.lang.IllegalStateException: @NotNull method .../.../createSynthetiser(...) must not return null

There are several benefits to this approach:

  • both NullPointerException and IllegalStateException extends RuntimeException so you're not fundamentally changing your program

  • the exception shall be thrown immediately where the error happens (not later on, once you either check/throw yourself or once you try to dereference null)

  • you don't need to bother writing the if ... == null / throw part anymore.

As a, gigantic, added benefit some IDE (like IntelliJ IDEA) will warn you in real-time about probable @NotNull violations.

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"Some IDE (like IntelliJ IDEA)" - actually, only IDEA, because @NotNull is an IDEA extension. It does not, AFAIK, exist in standard Java. The behaviour of throwing an IllegalStateException certainly does not exist in standard Java, and i doubt that's purely an IDEA thing either. Are you running with some kind of AOP in place? –  Tom Anderson Oct 17 '11 at 13:32
    
@Tom Anderson: Throwing an IllegalStateException makes perfect sense in this case and is precisely one of the thing Michael B. suggested in his answer. Then I don't know what you mean by "IDEA extension". NotNull is a Java 1.5 annotation and you can use it in any Java program: it's a tiny .jar. The benefits are so huge to using such an annotation that there really are zero reason not to. But, granted, the real-time checking may only be possible under IDEA but it doesn't make NotNull not mega-useful. –  Cedric Martin Oct 17 '11 at 15:09
    
Central.createSynthesizer is a method from the Java Speech API and not under my control, so I cannot annotate it. However, +1 for throwing the exception immediately, though I accepted Tomasz's answer because his answer solely talks about the reason for throwing an exception right there and then. –  ThomasH Oct 17 '11 at 15:16
    
@Tom Anderson: btw no we're not running any AOP. If a method that is not supposed to return null does return null, it can be argued quite easily that the program is in an illegal state and hence an ISEx makes sense (once again, throwing an ISEx is one of the thing Michael B. suggested). It has also been argued that, in the end, nearly all exceptions boil down to either an illegal state or an illegal argument. On an not-so unrelated sidenote IntelliJ IDEA is probably the best Swing app ever written and we probably have a few things to learn from the very smart brain at JetBrains ; ) –  Cedric Martin Oct 17 '11 at 15:19
    
Cedric: chill! I love @NotNull, i think it's a great idea, and it's cool that there is automatic checking for it. I also don't disagree that an IllegalStateException is a sensible exception here. And of course i respect IDEA, a great IDE. But honestly, @NotNull is not part of standard Java, and the runtime checking must require some sort of AOP or other magic. If you believe otherwise, i would love to see a small code sample that i can compile and run on the command-line without any extra libraries. –  Tom Anderson Oct 17 '11 at 16:28
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Regarding the original code:

synthesizer = Central.createSynthesizer(generalDesc);

if (synthesizer == null) {
    // (1) throw NPE explicitly
    throw new NullPointerException("No general domain synthesizer found.");
}

// (2) let the JVM throw the NPE when dereferencing
synthesizer.allocate();

My take is that throwing the NPE as shown here is OK, but with tremendous caveats. The caveat under which this is OK is only if the NPE ctor argument is a sufficiently descriptive (and hopefully unique) message (one hopefully pulled out of a constant or resource set.) Another caveat is that your main priority to get things out of the door, and such casea, this would count as an acceptable quick-n-dirty solution.

Under ideal circumstances, my preference is use exceptions specific to invalid configurations. And when those are not available, to either use NPE subclasses (like Apache Commons Math's NullArgumentException) or the old exceptions found in Apache Common Lang 2.x. That is my position for NPEs and IllegalArgument-type exceptions. I don't necessarily agree with Apache Common Lang's position on preferring to use the standard JDK exceptions over more semantically-relevant exceptions. But that's just me, and I'm getting off the tangent...

... so back to the original question. As I said before, throwing the NPE like that is ok in a quick-n-dirty way (when you are in one of those "need to get that sh1t out!!(10+1)" kind of situations.

Notice, however, this is a NPE caused by an application or systems configuration problem, as you correctly identified it. That is, the NPE is not the root cause, by a symptom or effect of another error condition (in this case, a configuration or environment error.)

Central.createSynthesizer returns null if it cannot find a suitable synthesizer, which is most often caused by a missing speech.properties file. So it's a matter of wrong setup of the system, and pretty unrecoverable from at runtime, rather than circumstances that need to be handled programmatically.

Unrecoverability is not a certainty. An application could have other ways to handle this situation programmatically.

As such, I believe throwing a NullPointerException is a valid response, since it indicates a bug (not in the code but in the deployment of the software). But since the synthesizer object is dereferenced in the very next statement, should I just let the JVM throw the NPE for me and save the null check?

I wouldn't do that, even under get-that-sh1t-out-of-the-door circumstances. The NPE thrown that way by the JVM will have a very uninformative message in it. In general, check everything for NULL and throw a descriptive exception (NPE or otherwise) when you encounter one.

Don't check for NPEs if you can guarantee that whatever you are getting (parameters for example) has already been checked for NPEs already (in a design-by-contract kind of way.)

Addendum: Considering that speech.properties gets loaded when the JVM starts needs to exist on the filesystem in (normally) "user.home" or "java.home/lib", it is puzzling that createSynthesizer doesn't straight up throw an NPE (which is what I had written originally in a Freudian slip) when it fails to find it but returns null instead.

Again, that's because the response to that situation is application specific. The application might decide to go on a limping mode with partial functionality instead of crashing and burning to the ground. If createSynthesizer were to throw a NPE, then the API designer forces the application designer to adopt the later behavior, or go to somewhat greater lengths to implement a "limping" mode of operations (by having to use a catch/try instead of a simple if-null test.

I think that throwing a NullPointerException is the right thing to do here, because it indicates an actual bug in the deployment of the software.

Again, only if the NPE is a quick-n-dirty solution to get things out of the door. Under those conditions, it is ok. A better approach is to identify what this is, a configuration error.

So it would be better to have application specific exceptions like IllegalConfigurationException or InvalidConfigurationException or IncompleteConfigurationException. I don't like using java.lang.IllegalStateException for such cases, because this is not caused by calling something in an invalid state. The invalid state got reached because of an invalid configuration. Maybe I'm playing semantic games, but there is something icky about using IllegalStateException in such cases (that's just me being subjective, I know.)

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Very interesting question.

I think some kind of ProblemCreatingSynthesizerException should be thrown by that method, instead of returning null.

I'd put the null check and throw a NPE or other custom ProblemWithSynthesizerException of your own (Sun, for some reason, conceived this Exception as a JVM-ish exception, not meant to be used by the programmer. This is what it says in some certification tutorials and books. However, I don't buy that, and some often I throw my own NPEs in my libraries).

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Sorry, I had an error in the original question statement. Central.createSynthesizer actually returns null, which is where my predicament comes from in the first place. It only does so if there is a problem in the deployment of the software (read: faulty speech engine installation). Sorry for the confusion. –  ThomasH Oct 17 '11 at 15:09
    
Ok. Edited answer. –  Mister Smith Oct 17 '11 at 15:51
    
Throw BadSynthesizerConfigurationException? –  Demetri Aug 30 '13 at 17:49
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I have never used Java, but if I were using the application, I would want to see an error message than a crash. NullPointerException sounds like a bug in the code to me - I would rather see an error message with directions on how to properly configure the program, or at least a hyperlink to a web page that had such directions.

If I were a user and saw that a program had terminated with NullPointerException, I would file a bug against the program, or at least be confused as to what to do next.

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