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I'm wondering how to go about checking that a method returns a container encapsulating some collection which is the aggregate of multiple other containers returned by mock objects. That is, it contains all the elements of the individual containers. I have some tests elsewhere that check the container 'works' (add/addAll/etc), so I know that works, but I'm not sure how go about with the test below 'createsRoadUsersAccordingToAllAddedCreators'.

I have a RoadUserCreationDaemon class which I call create upon which returns a RoadUserContainer according to added RoadUserCreator's. A simplified version:

public class RoadUserCreationDaemon {

    private SimulationManager simulationManager;
    private List<RoadUserCreator> roadUserCreators;

    public RoadUserCreationDaemon(SimulationManager simulationManager) {
        this.simulationManager = simulationManager;
        roadUserCreators = new ArrayList<RoadUserCreator>();
    }

    public void addRoadUserCreator(RoadUserCreator roadUserCreator) {
        roadUserCreators.add(roadUserCreator);
    }

    public RoadUserContainer createRoadUsers() {
        RoadUserContainer roadUsers = new RoadUserContainerImpl(); 
        for (RoadUserCreator creator : roadUserCreators) {
            roadUsers.addAll(createRoadUsers(creator));
        }
        return roadUsers;
    }

    public RoadUserContainer createRoadUsers(
            RoadUserCreator roadUserCreator) {
        return roadUserCreator.create();
    }
}

I started by writing a test (JUnit4 / JMock2.5.1) for createRoadUsers which returns a RoadUserContainer with a supplied creator. Then I started writing a test for a non-parameterised createRoadUsers to see if it returns a container with all the elements of the individual containers returned by the creators:

@RunWith(JMock.class)
public class TestRoadUserCreationDaemon {
    Mockery context = new JUnit4Mockery();      
    private RoadUserCreationDaemon daemon;      
    private RoadUserCreator roadUserCreator;    
    private SimulationManager simulationManager;        
    private RoadUserContainer createdRoadUsers;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        simulationManager = context.mock(SimulationManager.class);
        daemon = new RoadUserCreationDaemon(simulationManager);

        roadUserCreator = context.mock(RoadUserCreator.class);
        createdRoadUsers = context.mock(RoadUserContainer.class);
    }       

    @Test
    public void createsRoadUsersAccordingToAllAddedCreators() throws Exception {
        final RoadUserCreator anotherRoadUserCreator = context.mock(RoadUserCreator.class, "anotherRUC");
        final RoadUserContainer moreCreatedRoadUsers = context.mock(RoadUserContainer.class, "moreCRU");
        context.checking(new Expectations() {{
            oneOf (roadUserCreator).create(); will(returnValue(createdRoadUsers));
            oneOf (anotherRoadUserCreator).create(); will(returnValue(moreCreatedRoadUsers));

            oneOf (createdRoadUsers).roadUsersAsList();
            oneOf (moreCreatedRoadUsers).roadUsersAsList();
        }});

        daemon.addRoadUserCreator(roadUserCreator);
        daemon.addRoadUserCreator(anotherRoadUserCreator);
        daemon.createRoadUsers();

        //how to easily check that the two lists are equivilant - have same items, but not the same object?
        //assertEquals(createdRoadUsers, daemon.createRoadUsers() );
    }

    @Test
    public void createsRoadUsersAccordingToCreator() throws Exception {

        context.checking(new Expectations() {{
            oneOf (roadUserCreator).create(); will(returnValue(createdRoadUsers));
        }});
        assertEquals(createdRoadUsers, daemon.createRoadUsers(roadUserCreator));
    }
}

As the comment says...I'm not sure how to proceed in a non-ugly way.

The 'RoadUserContainer' interface:

public interface RoadUserContainer extends Iterable<RoadUser> {
    public void add(RoadUser roadUser);
    public Iterator<RoadUser> iterator();
    public void addAll(RoadUserContainer createRoadUsers);
    public List<RoadUser> roadUsersAsList();
    public boolean equals(RoadUserContainer otherContainer);
    ...
}

I am new to TDD and mocking, and this is my first Java project for >6 years, so feel free to comment on ancillary aesthetics!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would probably initially use real containers and mock the other objects. Then use hamcrest to interrogate the resulting object.

The test I would want to create would look something like this:

final RoadUser roadUser0 = context.mock(RoadUser.class, "roadUser0");
final RoadUser roadUser1 = context.mock(RoadUser.class, "roadUser1");
final RoadUser roadUser2 = context.mock(RoadUser.class, "roadUser2");

final RoadUserCreator roadUserCreator0 = context.mock(RoadUserCreator.class, "roadUserCreator0");
final RoadUserCreator roadUserCreator1 = context.mock(RoadUserCreator.class, "roadUserCreator1");

final RoadUserCreationDaemon daemon = new RoadUserCreationDaemon(null);
daemon.addRoadUserCreator(roadUserCreator0);
daemon.addRoadUserCreator(roadUserCreator1);        

context.checking(new Expectations() {{
    oneOf(roadUserCreator0).create(); will(returnValue(roadUsers(roadUser0, roadUser1)));
    oneOf(roadUserCreator1).create(); will(returnValue(roadUsers(roadUser2)));
}});

assertThat(daemon.createRoadUsers(), contains(roadUser0, roadUser1, roadUser2));

you will need these imports from hamcrest:

import static org.hamcrest.MatcherAssert.assertThat;
import static org.hamcrest.Matchers.contains;

If order is not important you could use containsInAnyOrder instead of contains

you would also need to create the utility method "roadUsers"

public static RoadUserContainer roadUsers(final RoadUser... roadUsers)
{
    return new RoadUserContainerImpl(roadUsers);
}

An alternative design would be to change the interface of the RoadUserCreationDaemon

public void createRoadUsers(final RoadUserContainer roadUsers) {
    for (final RoadUserCreator roadUserCreator : roadUserCreators) {
        roadUsers.addAll(roadUserCreator.create());
    }
}

Then you could write the tests like this:

final RoadUserContainer roadUserContainer0 = context.mock(RoadUserContainer.class, "roadUserContainer0");
final RoadUserContainer roadUserContainer1 = context.mock(RoadUserContainer.class, "roadUserContainer1");

final RoadUserContainer resultRoadUserContainer = context.mock(RoadUserContainer.class, "resultRoadUserContainer");

final RoadUserCreator roadUserCreator0 = context.mock(RoadUserCreator.class, "roadUserCreator0");
final RoadUserCreator roadUserCreator1 = context.mock(RoadUserCreator.class, "roadUserCreator1");

final RoadUserCreationDaemon daemon = new RoadUserCreationDaemon(null);
daemon.addRoadUserCreator(roadUserCreator0);
daemon.addRoadUserCreator(roadUserCreator1);

context.checking(new Expectations() {
    {
        oneOf(roadUserCreator0).create();
        will(returnValue(roadUserContainer0));
        oneOf(roadUserCreator1).create();
        will(returnValue(roadUserContainer1));

        oneOf(resultRoadUserContainer).addAll(roadUserContainer0);
        oneOf(resultRoadUserContainer).addAll(roadUserContainer1);
    }
});

daemon.createRoadUsers(resultRoadUserContainer);

If the order of the calls to "addAll" is important you can use a jmock sequence

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I think I would mock the Creator but have it return real Containers. The idea of the test is to make sure that the Daemon invoked all of the creator's create methods, right? So your test condition would look like

  RoadUserContainer result = daemon.createRoadUsers();

  // Check that the result contains both creator's users
  Assert.assertEquals(createdRoadUsers.size() + moreCreatedRoadUsers.size(), result.size());

  for (RoadUser user : createdRoadUsers)
      Assert.assertTrue(result.contains(user));
  for (RoadUser user : moreCreatedRoadUsers)
      Assert.assertTrue(result.contains(user));
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OK, so would your criteria for it being ok to create an actual container be that the container remains a 'value' object? –  neuronotic Oct 17 '11 at 16:11
    
It doesn't have to be a value object - just verify that the container created by the daemon contains all users that are created by the 2 creator objects. Does that make sense? –  jeff Oct 17 '11 at 17:12
    
yeah, I think I understood - and that is currently how I have proceeded (thanks ;)). However, it still seems to leave a bit of a smell wrt coupling it to actual implementations of other objects. I've up-voted the answer, but I'll hold off from marking it answered for a day or three. –  neuronotic Oct 17 '11 at 17:24
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