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Developing a C# .NET 2.0 WinForm Application. Need the application to close and restart itself.

Application.Restart();

The above method has proven to be unreliable.

What is a better way to restart the application?

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3  
I'm curious about the need to restart your app. I've never thought about that need before What are your circumstances? –  JeffH Apr 30 '09 at 13:55
    
Our particular circumstance - a media player application which is supposed to run through some images and flash content in a loop. Should run for days and days without a machine restart, and there is no keyboard/mouse so no user interaction. If the program crashes (unhandled exception), need to restart the program, not exit out or display an error. stackoverflow.com/questions/773768/… See that for why the program keeps having exceptions I can't prevent. :( –  Adam Nofsinger Apr 30 '09 at 17:23
1  
In the end, a much better solution for our application was to develop a small Watchdog application that gets started (if not running already) from the main application. The watchdog simply checks every 10 seconds or so to see if the main application still has a process running, and if it doesn't, it starts one. Simple, elegant, and much sturdier than trying to restart from the main app. –  Adam Nofsinger Feb 23 '11 at 14:33

16 Answers 16

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Unfortunately you can't use Process.Start() to start an instance of the currently running process. According to the Process.Start() docs: "If the process is already running, no additional process resource is started..."

This technique will work fine under the VS debugger (because VS does some kind of magic that causes Process.Start to think the process is not already running), but will fail when not run under the debugger. (Note that this may be OS-specific - I seem to remember that in some of my testing, it worked on either XP or Vista, but I may just be remembering running it under the debugger.)

This technique is exactly the one used by the last programmer on the project on which I'm currently working, and I've been trying to find a workaround for this for quite some time. So far, I've only found one solution, and it just feels dirty and kludgy to me: start a 2nd application, that waits in the background for the first application to terminate, then re-launches the 1st application. I'm sure it would work, but, yuck.

Edit: Using a 2nd application works. All I did in the second app was:

    static void RestartApp(int pid, string applicationName )
    {
        // Wait for the process to terminate
        Process process = null;
        try
        {
            process = Process.GetProcessById(pid);
            process.WaitForExit(1000);
        }
        catch (ArgumentException ex)
        {
            // ArgumentException to indicate that the 
            // process doesn't exist?   LAME!!
        }
        Process.Start(applicationName, "");
    }

(This is a very simplified example. The real code has lots of sanity checking, error handling, etc)

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with HiredMind, and I actually went with the same "Watchdog program" implementation myself shortly after writing the answer. Sorry, should have come back here and updated. I wouldn't think it should feel too horribly ugly/yucky/dirty. The Watchdog program pattern is pretty widely used. –  Adam Nofsinger Sep 29 '09 at 19:30
    
You don't actually need a second application on disk... you could use a script and generate it on the fly with a temporary name... I think this may alleviate your sense of guilty having a second application for the sake of restarting your own... Or you could "emit" an entire C# application, compile it, save it to disk and execute it (dirty, dirty thinking).. –  Loudenvier Mar 29 '13 at 16:01

If you are in main app form try to use

System.Diagnostics.Process.Start( Application.ExecutablePath); // to start new instance of application
this.Close(); //to turn off current app
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-1 too similar to other answers –  John Saunders Sep 17 '10 at 19:34
4  
It is similar, but different. Application.Exit didn't work form me, and this.Close() did the job. –  Darqer Sep 18 '10 at 19:28

I might be late to the party but here is my simple solution and it works like a charm with every application I have:

        try
        {
            //run the program again and close this one
            Process.Start(Application.StartupPath + "\\blabla.exe"); 
            //or you can use Application.ExecutablePath

            //close this one
            Process.GetCurrentProcess().Kill();
        }
        catch
        { }
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Works very well on Win-7-x64 and Win-XP-x32. I see nothing about any constraints in the docs. This should be the accepted answer. –  Bitterblue Jul 31 '14 at 6:04
    
@Bitterblue The link to the docs you posted states "If the process is already running, no additional process resource is started." It's the 3rd line in the remarks section. I wish it wasn't this way, but it is. –  HiredMind Mar 11 at 2:00
    
@HiredMind I guess we could argue about what "constraints" means to each of us. But the section is titled "Remarks" not "Constraints". So I can live with it. And why do you wish it wasn't this way? Did you experience any problems with that? Because I didn't. Works flawlessly for me. –  Bitterblue Mar 11 at 13:01
    
@HiredMind This is nothing personal or anything but the idea of using a second app or a script just to restart my C# app is repellent to me. Win7 executes this method in Release mode flawlessly so far (I use it to restart my app when user changes language = nothing important). So I would rather tell the user to restart the app manually than to use methods I don't approve of myself. I've used scripts in the past and I totally didn't like it. –  Bitterblue Mar 11 at 13:18
    
@BitterBlue I agree that using a 2nd app sucks - I said so in my answer. But have you tried the single-app method outside the debugger? It didn't work on some versions of Windows when left this answer, and Release or Debug mode had nothing to do with it. If it works for you, great! But I got bitten by this problem and what I got were hundreds of angry users. –  HiredMind Mar 11 at 16:16

I had the same exact problem and I too had a requirement to prevent duplicate instances - I propose an alternative solution to the one HiredMind is proposing (which will work fine).

What I am doing is starting the new process with the processId of the old process (the one that triggers the restart) as a cmd line argument:

// Shut down the current app instance.
Application.Exit();

// Restart the app passing "/restart [processId]" as cmd line args
Process.Start(Application.ExecutablePath, "/restart" + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Id);

Then when the new app starts I first parse the cm line args and check if the restart flag is there with a processId, then wait for that process to Exit:

if (_isRestart)
{
   try
   {
      // get old process and wait UP TO 5 secs then give up!
      Process oldProcess = Process.GetProcessById(_restartProcessId);
      oldProcess.WaitForExit(5000);
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   { 
      // the process did not exist - probably already closed!
      //TODO: --> LOG
   }
}

I am obviously not showing all the safety checks that I have in place etc.

Even if not ideal - I find this a valid alternative so that you don't have to have in place a separate app just to handle restart.

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IMHO that there is a neater solution to this. I also have a requirement to have single instance and allow the user to restart the application (e.g. when it crashes). I nearly implemented your solution, however it occurred to me that it would be better to simply add a different command line argument that allows multiple instances to run. –  Dennis Oct 31 '11 at 9:31
    
mmm, you're reversing the logic - I like it! Only issue is that if someone figures out the cmd line argument that allows multiple instances strange stuff could happen :D –  JohnIdol Nov 1 '11 at 0:02
    
Well, I was fortunate that it was a feature that users had been requesting so it was WIN-WIN. I would prefer they 'find' an /allowMultipleInstances flag than the rather strange /restart one. –  Dennis Nov 1 '11 at 0:05
    
Yeah if you allow for multiple instances that is a better solution for sure :) –  JohnIdol Nov 1 '11 at 10:16
    
@JohnIdol Nice. I think I'll change my flag to "-waitForProcessToExit" or something but otherwise that's a more elegant solution. Right now I'm grappling with a ClickOnce problem with referencing one EXE from another EXE, and this would solve that. –  HiredMind Mar 11 at 2:05

A much simpler approach that worked for me is:

Application.Restart();
Environment.Exit();

This preserves the command-line arguments and works despite event handlers that would normally prevent the application from closing.

The Restart() call tries to exit, starts a new instance anyway and returns. The Exit() call then terminates the process without giving any event handlers a chance to run. There is a very brief period in which both processes are running, which is not a problem in my case, but may be in other cases.

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1  
Application.Restart() by itself worked for me, thanks! –  theJerm Jan 22 '13 at 4:19

Its Simple you just need to call the Application.Restart() methods which tends to invoke you application for being restarted. But you must have to exit from the Local environment with their error codes:

Application.Restart();
Environment.exit(int errorcode);

you can create an enumeration of error code for that you may use it efficeintly.
Another method is to just exit form the application and start the process having executable path:

Application.exit();
System.Diagnostics.Process.Start(Application.ExecutablePath);
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Worked well for me, no need for the watchdog app in my case. –  user685590 May 16 '13 at 11:54

You are forgetting the command-line options/parameters that were passed in to your currently running instance. If you don't pass those in, you are not doing a real restart. Set the Process.StartInfo with a clone of your process' parameters, then do a start.

For example, if your process was started as myexe -f -nosplash myfile.txt, your method would only execute myexe without all those flags and parameters.

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I updated my answer to address this issue. –  Adam Nofsinger Apr 23 '09 at 15:13
3  
-1 This is not an answer - it should be a comment. –  EMP Feb 23 '11 at 3:12

Start/Exit Method

// Get the parameters/arguments passed to program if any
string arguments = string.Empty;
string[] args = Environment.GetCommandLineArgs();
for (int i = 1; i < args.Length; i++) // args[0] is always exe path/filename
    arguments += args[i] + " ";

// Restart current application, with same arguments/parameters
Application.Exit();
System.Diagnostics.Process.Start(Application.ExecutablePath, arguments);

This seems to work better than Application.Restart();

Not sure how this handles if your program protects against multiple instance. My guess is you would be better off launching a second .exe which pauses and then starts your main application for you.

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2  
That might not work if application is protected from multiple instances. –  majkinetor Apr 23 '09 at 10:34
    
@majkinetor - Noted in updated answer to question. –  Adam Nofsinger Apr 23 '09 at 15:23
    
Yah, I have a feeling calling Application.Exit() only causes some message to be added to a queue somewhere that needs to be pumped, so the second bit of code here in my answer probably would indeed not work. –  Adam Nofsinger Apr 27 '09 at 21:07
    
Unfortunately this technique doesn't work (I wish it did! It's so much more simple than my solution). It will work inside the Visual Studio debugger but not in practice. See my answer for a kludgy solution that works outside the debugger. –  HiredMind Sep 9 '09 at 20:15
    
HiredMind might be right. I ended up going with a Watchdog pattern solution. –  Adam Nofsinger Feb 10 '10 at 16:40

I wanted the new application start up after the old one shuts down.

Using process.WaitForExit() to wait for your own process to shutdown makes no sense. It will always time out.

So, my approach is to use Application.Exit() then wait, but allow events to be processed, for a period of time. Then start a new application with the same arguments as the old.

static void restartApp() {
    string commandLineArgs = getCommandLineArgs();
    string exePath = Application.ExecutablePath;
    try {
        Application.Exit();
        wait_allowingEvents( 1000 );
    } catch( ArgumentException ex ) {
        throw;
    }
    Process.Start( exePath, commandLineArgs );
}

static string getCommandLineArgs() {
    Queue<string> args = new Queue<string>( Environment.GetCommandLineArgs() );
    args.Dequeue(); // args[0] is always exe path/filename
    return string.Join( " ", args.ToArray() );
}

static void wait_allowingEvents( int durationMS ) {
    DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
    do {
        Application.DoEvents();
    } while( start.Subtract( DateTime.Now ).TotalMilliseconds > durationMS );
}
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Try this code:

bool appNotRestarted = true;

This code must also be in the function:

if (appNotRestarted == true) {
    appNotRestarted = false;
    Application.Restart();
    Application.ExitThread();
}
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Here's my 2 cents:

The sequence Start New Instance->Close Current Instance should work even for the applications that don't allow running multiple copies simultaneously as in this case the new instance may be passed a command-line argument which will indicate that there is a restart in progress so checking for other instances running will not be necessary. Waiting for the first instance to actually finish my be implemented too if it's absolutely imperative that no two intstances are running in parallel.

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You could also use Restarter.

Restarter is an application that automatically monitor and restarts crashed or hung programs and applications. It was originally developed to monitor and restart game servers, but it will do the job for any console or form based program or application

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I had a similar problem, but mine was related to unmanageable memory leak that I couldn't find on an app that has to run 24/7. With the customer I agreed that safe time to restart the app was 03:00AM if the memory consumption was over the defined value.

I tried Application.Restart, but since it seems to use some mechanism that starts new instance while it is already running, I went for another scheme. I used the trick that file system handles persist until process that created them dies. So, from The Application, i dropped the file to the disk, and didn't Dispose() the handle. I used the file to send 'myself' executable and starting directory also (to add flexibility).

Code:

_restartInProgress = true;
string dropFilename = Path.Combine(Application.StartupPath, "restart.dat");
StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(new FileStream(dropFilename, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.ReadWrite));
sw.WriteLine(Application.ExecutablePath);
sw.WriteLine(Application.StartupPath);
sw.Flush();
Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo
{
    FileName = Path.Combine(Application.StartupPath, "VideoPhill.Restarter.exe"),
    WorkingDirectory = Application.StartupPath,
    Arguments = string.Format("\"{0}\"", dropFilename)
});
Close();

Close() at the end would initiate app shutdown, and file handle I used for StreamWriter here would be held open until process really dies. Then...

Restarter.exe comes into action. It TRIES to read the file in exclusive mode, preventing it to gain access until main app wasn't dead, then starts main app, deletes the file and exists. I guess that it can't be simpler:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string filename = args[0];
    DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
    bool done = false;
    while ((DateTime.Now - start).TotalSeconds < 30 && !done)
    {
        try
        {
            StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.ReadWrite));
            string[] runData = new string[2];
            runData[0] = sr.ReadLine();
            runData[1] = sr.ReadLine();
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo { FileName = runData[0], WorkingDirectory = runData[1] });
            sr.Dispose();
            File.Delete(filename);
            done = true;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
}
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How about create a bat file, run the batch file before closing, and then close the current instance.

The batch file does this:

  1. wait in a loop to check whether the process has exited.
  2. start the process.
share|improve this answer
    
Which is a poor man's watchdog application, which I describe a little more detailed above. The key benefit of a real watchdog application is that it will even handle if the original app dies without being able to spin something off. –  Adam Nofsinger Dec 15 '11 at 3:01
    
@AdamNofsinger I see now. I missed that comment. You might want to edit your post with that solution you use. –  AZ. Dec 15 '11 at 18:00

I fear that restarting the entire application using Process is approaching your problem in the wrong way.

An easier way is to modify the Program.cs file to restart:

    static bool restart = true; // A variable that is accessible from program

    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);

        while (restart)
        {
           restart = false; // if you like.. the program can set it to true again

           try {
              Application.Run(new YourMainForm());
           }
           catch {  // Application has crashed
              restart = true;
           }
        }
    }
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I would just write a Restarter App that accepts the file path of the app you want to restart as a string argument to pass into it's static main method. Then the restarter app closes the process, waits for it to exit then it starts the app using the argument (exe file path to start). Then in the app you are restarting I would set it up to check its string arguments for a message from the restarter. Since the restarter will start your app, it can pass a string arg to your app to clean up the restart app resources (ensuring the process is closed and delete the restarter app itself if your app can just compile the restarter app on the fly). If you want code, just comment and I will make it.

App Compiles Restarter->Starts restarter passing in exe filepath->App then calls application.exit after it starts the restarterapp->Restarter app first waits for the app to exit->restarter starts app using exe path passed in, when it restarts the app, it passes a message into app saying to ensure the restarter is cleaned up.->App starts, knows it was restarted and ensures restarter process is closed and it's executable file is deleted (you can pass in the restarter path)

Code:

//The App to Restart
static void Main(string[] args)//this app is only to demo restart and will run too quick to get anything from it... just look at the code and modify it for your situation
{
    if (args != null && args.Length > 0 && File.Exists(args[0]))//in my example, if true it must be the restarter app passing in its file path
    {
        //loop processes and make sure your retarter app closed
        Process[] processes = Process.GetProcessesByName("Restarter");//when you compile your app with codeproviders, you can name the assembly with the CompilerParameters class
        foreach (Process p in processes)
        {
            p.Kill();
            p.WaitForExit();
        }

        //once you waited for close delete the app
        File.Delete(args[0]);
    }
    else//must not be restarting
    {
        string restarterFilePath = null;
        //use compiler automation (CodeProviders class) to compile the restarter apps code and reference its path (will add once if requested, i left out so i could write this more quickly)

        //if compile is successful then start and exit this app
        Process.Start(restarterFilePath, "\"" + Application.ExecutablePath + "\"");//surround in quotes since the path can have spaces and will mess up the args
        Application.Exit();//this is not needed in my example since it leaves main scope after this line and will close anyway but in your app you will want to exit after starting restarter and ensure you return out of the methods you are executing
    }
}

//The restarter app (i would use codeprovider to compile this on the fly when i need to restart since i may not have a place to host updater files)
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    if (args == null || args.Length == 0 || !File.Exists(args[0])) return;//this app was started in a way not intended

    FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(args[0]);
    while (IsFileInUse(fi)) Thread.Sleep(0);//wait for app to restart to close

    Process.Start(args[0], "\"" + Application.ExecutablePath + "\"");//restart the app
}

//helpful method
static bool IsFileInUse(FileInfo file)
{
    FileStream stream = null;

    try
    {
        stream = file.Open(FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None);
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        //the file is unavailable because it is:
        //still being written to
        //or being processed by another thread
        //or does not exist (has already been processed)
        return File.Exists(file.FullName);//i dont want to flag as in use if it does not exist, fyi, this method does not ensure a valid file path is passed in, read documentation on exists method
    }
    finally
    {
        if (stream != null)
            stream.Close();
    }
    return false;
}
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The code would make your answer far more useful, yes. Especially if it brings something that the already existing answers don't. –  X.L.Ant Apr 23 at 15:32
    
@ X.L.Ant I just made a quick description of the order of operations if that helps ;) Let me know if you still want code and I will find time to write it:) Also my answer very well might be covered above but just a way I came up with that I usually implement in my Updater apps. Updaters usually need to restart apps ;) –  chey Apr 23 at 15:35
    
Code added, let me know if you have a question. Just note you can compile your restarter app and maintain it somewhere for your apps to use. I like to keep my directories clean so I would just compile when needed and delete the app when done. –  chey Apr 23 at 16:27

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