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I need to perform a raw sql on multiple tables. I then render the result set. For one table I would do:

sql = "select * from my_table"
results = my_table.objects.raw(sql)

For multiple tables I am doing:

sql = "select * from my_table, my_other_table where ...."
results = big_model.objects.raw(sql)

But, do I really need to create a table/model/class big_model, which contains all fields that I may need? I will never actually store any data in this "table".

ADDED:

I have a table my_users. I have a table my_listings. These are defined in Models.py. The table my_listings has a foreign key to my_users, indicating who created the listing.

The SQL is

"select user_name, listing_text from my_listings, my_users where my_users.id = my_listings.my_user_id". 

I want this SQL to generate a result set that I can use to render my page in django.

The question is: Do I have to create a model that contains the fields user_name and listing_text? Or is there some better way that still uses raw SQL (select, from, where)? Of course, my actual queries are more complicated than this example. (The models that I define in models.py become actual tables in the database hence the use of the model/table term. Not sure how else to refer to them, sorry.) I use raw sql because I found that python table references only work with simple data models.

share|improve this question
    
It's not clear what you are trying to accomplish here. Perhaps showing more detail about your models and what this query is meant to do would help. –  Mark Lavin Oct 17 '11 at 13:58
    
I want to select from more than one table where the tables are joined by a foreign key. I don't need help writing the actual query. Sorry, I'm not sure why that isn't clear :( –  user984003 Oct 17 '11 at 14:03
    
It looks like you need help with the query. I'm not sure why you think you need raw SQL to do this in Django. If you don't need help writing the query then I have even less of an idea about what you are asking. –  Mark Lavin Oct 17 '11 at 14:12
1  
it is not clear because "table", "model", and "class" are three different things, and you use them interchangeably. Then, you mention "big_model" without explaining what it is and how it is related to the question, and then you ask whether you really need to create this big_model without explaining what your aim is. Your last sentence is unclear to me because it basically asks whether you need a model if you are not going to use it. the answer is "no, you do not need such a model". –  akonsu Oct 17 '11 at 14:12
    
I added an edit... –  user984003 Oct 17 '11 at 14:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. This works. Don't know why it didn't before :( From Dennis Baker's comment:

You do NOT need to have a model with all the fields in it, you just need the first model and fields from that. You do need to have the fields with unique names and as far as I know you should use "tablename.field as fieldname" to make sure you have all unique fields. I've done some fairly complex queries with 5+ tables this way and always tie them back to a single model. –

2 . Another solution is to use a cursor. However, a cursor has to be changed from a list of tuples to a list of dictionaries. I'm sure there are cleaner ways using iterators, but this function works. It takes a string, which is the raw sql query, and returns a list which can be rendered and used in a template.

from django.db import connection, transaction

def sql_select(sql):
    cursor = connection.cursor()
    cursor.execute(sql)
    results = cursor.fetchall()
    list = []
    i = 0
    for row in results:
        dict = {} 
        field = 0
        while True:
           try:
                dict[cursor.description[field][0]] = str(results[i][field])
                field = field +1
            except IndexError as e:
                break
        i = i + 1
        list.append(dict) 
    return list  
share|improve this answer

you do not need a model that includes the fields that you want to return from your raw sql. If you happen to have a model that actually has the fields that you want to return from your raw sql then you can map your raw sql output to this model, otherwise you can use cursors to go around models altogether.

share|improve this answer
    
The documentation here docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/db/sql says "raw() automatically maps fields in the query to fields on the model." That indicates that I must have a model that contains at least the fields from the query. Since the query generates fields from two tables, then I must have a third model containing those fields, no? This is what I am hoping to avoid. –  user984003 Oct 17 '11 at 14:46
    
It took me a while to understand the problem :) this is a very good question, and I think django lacks very much in this area. I have changed my answer. –  akonsu Oct 17 '11 at 14:49
    
You do NOT need to have a model with all the fields in it, you just need the first model and fields from that. You do need to have the fields with unique names and as far as I know you should use "tablename.field as fieldname" to make sure you have all unique fields. I've done some fairly complex queries with 5+ tables this way and always tie them back to a single model. –  Dennis Baker Oct 17 '11 at 17:56
    
Yes, you're right, I don't need a model with all the names! Don't know why I kept getting field does not exist errors (or some such error). I tried again and it works. Thanks. I'll copy this to the solution. –  user984003 Oct 19 '11 at 9:20

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