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I need to convert a decimal number to formatted string with thousand groups and unlimited (variable) decimal numbers:


    1234 -> "1,234"
    1234,567 -> "1,234.567"
    1234,1234567890123456789 -> "1,234.1234567890123456789"

I tried String.Format("{0:#,#.#}", decimal), but it trims any number to max 1 decimal place.

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Be aware that the decimal type has a precision of 28-29 digits –  xanatos Oct 17 '11 at 14:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use # multiple times (see Custom Numeric Format Strings):

string.Format("{0:#,#.#############################}", decimalValue)

Or, if you're just formatting a number directly, you can also just use decimal.ToString with the format string.

However, there is no way to include "unlimited decimal numbers". Without a library supporting arbitrary precision floating point numbers (for example, using something like BigFloat from Extreme Numerics), you'll run into precision issues eventually. Even the decimal type has a limit to its precision (28-29 significant digits). Beyond that, you'll run into other issues.

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Unfortunatelly this is not a general solution for all decimal types (like double). –  jurev Oct 17 '11 at 14:33
    
@jurev: It is, but only to the limit of precision of the type in question. As I said, all standard floating point types have a limited precision - you can only work to the precision of the type. –  Reed Copsey Oct 17 '11 at 14:34
1  
@jurev: double is not a decimal type, it's a binary floating point with limited precision. –  Ben Voigt Oct 17 '11 at 14:34
    
@jurev to be precise, 15-16 digits msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/678hzkk9.aspx –  xanatos Oct 17 '11 at 14:52

As I've said, the decimal type has a precision of 28-29 digits.

decimal mon = 1234.12345678901234567890123M;
var monStr = mon.ToString("#,0.##############################");
var monStr2 = String.Format("{0:#,0.##############################}", mon);

Here there are 30x# after the decimal separator :-)

I've changed one # with 0 so that 0.15 isn't written as .15 .

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thanks, also nice suggestion for 0.15 :) –  jurev Oct 17 '11 at 14:58

this should do the trick

string DecimalToDecimalsString(decimal input_num)
        {            
            decimal d_integer = Math.Truncate(input_num); // = 1234,0000...
            decimal d_decimals = input_num-d_integer; // = 0,5678...

            while (Math.Truncate(d_decimals) != d_decimals)
                d_decimals *= 10; //remove decimals

            string s_integer = String.Format("{0:#,#}", d_integer);
            string s_decimals = String.Format("{0:#}", d_decimals);

            return s_integer + "." + s_decimals;
        }

replacing decimal with other types should work too.

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Interesting solution, however it does not work for international formatting (some countries have even different 1000's group separators for integer and decimal part). –  jurev Oct 17 '11 at 14:55

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