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Is there a way to delete entire directories recursively in Java? In the normal case it is possible to delete an empty directory. However when it comes to deleting entire directories with contents, it is not that simple anymore. How do you delete entire directories with contents in Java?

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2  
File.delete() should simply return false upon calling it with a non-empty directory. –  Benoit Apr 22 '09 at 22:38

14 Answers 14

up vote 192 down vote accepted

You should check out Apache's commons-io. It has a FileUtils class that will do what you want.

FileUtils.deleteDirectory(new File("directory"));
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1  
This function probably wraps the code that erickson provided in his answer. –  paweloque Apr 22 '09 at 22:42
6  
It's a little more thorough. It handles things like symbolic links correctly on Linux/Unix. svn.apache.org/viewvc/commons/proper/io/trunk/src/java/org/… –  Steve K Apr 22 '09 at 22:48
3  
I'd strongly recommend this, rather than having to re-implement that recursive method in nearly every project I touch :-( Not that it's bad/wrong, but the Commons stuff now delivers so much value –  Brian Agnew Apr 23 '09 at 9:40
3  
I wonder why FileUtils.deleteDirectory throws IOException where File.delete() doesn't. –  oksayt Sep 9 '10 at 8:43
1  
@BrianAgnew Actually, it is wrong, it stands against the principles of OOP. –  Hugo May 18 '12 at 14:20

With Java 7, we can finally do this with reliable symlink detection. (I don't consider Apache's commons-io to have reliable symlink detection at this time, as it doesn't handle links on Windows created with mklink.)

For the sake of history, here's a pre-Java 7 answer, which follows symlinks.

void delete(File f) throws IOException {
  if (f.isDirectory()) {
    for (File c : f.listFiles())
      delete(c);
  }
  if (!f.delete())
    throw new FileNotFoundException("Failed to delete file: " + f);
}
share|improve this answer
8  
File.delete() does not have that functionality. –  Benoit Apr 22 '09 at 22:34
10  
@Erickson: Isn't FileNotFoundException a poor exception for a delete failure? If the file is truly no longer there, it must have already been deleted, which means that, semantically, the delete did not fail - it had nothing to do. And if it failed for some other reason, it was not because the file was not found. –  Lawrence Dol Apr 23 '09 at 3:43
2  
I'm not sure Josh. The base case is when !f.isDirectory(). Is that what you mean? –  erickson Apr 23 '09 at 6:33
3  
@janwen I don't see it. Why won't the directories be deleted? –  erickson Dec 28 '12 at 19:12
4  
Be VERY CAREFUL. This will dereference symlinks. If you are on e.g. linux, and have a folder foo with a link foo/link such that link->/, calling delete(new File(foo)) will delete as much of your filesystem as your user is allowed to!! –  Miquel Jun 7 '13 at 18:20

Java 7 added support for walking directories with symlink handling:

import java.nio.file.*;

public static void removeRecursive(Path path) throws IOException
{
    Files.walkFileTree(path, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>()
    {
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file, BasicFileAttributes attrs)
                throws IOException
        {
            Files.delete(file);
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFileFailed(Path file, IOException exc) throws IOException
        {
            // try to delete the file anyway, even if its attributes
            // could not be read, since delete-only access is
            // theoretically possible
            Files.delete(file);
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult postVisitDirectory(Path dir, IOException exc) throws IOException
        {
            if (exc == null)
            {
                Files.delete(dir);
                return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
            }
            else
            {
                // directory iteration failed; propagate exception
                throw exc;
            }
        }
    });
}

I use this as a fallback from platform-specific methods (in this untested code):

public static void removeDirectory(Path directory) throws IOException
{
    // does nothing if non-existent
    if (Files.exists(directory))
    {
        try
        {
            // prefer OS-dependent directory removal tool
            if (SystemUtils.IS_OS_WINDOWS)
                Processes.execute("%ComSpec%", "/C", "RD /S /Q \"" + directory + '"');
            else if (SystemUtils.IS_OS_UNIX)
                Processes.execute("/bin/rm", "-rf", directory.toString());
        }
        catch (ProcessExecutionException | InterruptedException e)
        {
            // fallback to internal implementation on error
        }

        if (Files.exists(directory))
            removeRecursive(directory);
    }
}

(SystemUtils is from Apache Commons Lang. Processes is private but its behavior should be obvious.)

share|improve this answer
    
I do find one problem with Files.walkFileTree - it is insufficient for implementing a version of recursive delete where you keep deleting files until you run out of options. It is adequate for a fail-fast version, but fail-fast is not always what you want (e.g. if you're cleaning up temp files, you want delete-now, not fail-fast.) –  Trejkaz May 3 '13 at 0:41
    
I don't see why that is true. You can handle errors however you want -- you're not required to fail fast. The only issue I could foresee is that it might not handle new files being created during the walk of the current directory, but that is a unique situation better suited to a custom solution. –  Trevor Robinson May 3 '13 at 17:07
    
If you suppress the error from visitFile and call walkFileTree on a single file which fails, you get no error (so visitFile must propagate any error which occurs.) If you're deleting a directory and fail to delete one file, the only callback called is postVisitDirectory. i.e., it doesn't visit the other files in the directory if you get an error visiting one file. This is what I mean. I'm sure there is probably some way to work around this, but by the time we got to this point we had already written more code than a traditional recursive delete routine, so we decided against using it. –  Trejkaz May 6 '13 at 4:19

Just saw my solution is more or less the same as erickson's, just packaged as a static method. Drop this somewhere, it's much lighter weight than installing all of Apache Commons for something that (as you can see) is quite simple.

public class FileUtils {
    /**
     * By default File#delete fails for non-empty directories, it works like "rm". 
     * We need something a little more brutual - this does the equivalent of "rm -r"
     * @param path Root File Path
     * @return true iff the file and all sub files/directories have been removed
     * @throws FileNotFoundException
     */
    public static boolean deleteRecursive(File path) throws FileNotFoundException{
        if (!path.exists()) throw new FileNotFoundException(path.getAbsolutePath());
        boolean ret = true;
        if (path.isDirectory()){
            for (File f : path.listFiles()){
                ret = ret && FileUtils.deleteRecursive(f);
            }
        }
        return ret && path.delete();
    }
}
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Guava has Files.deleteRecursively

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12  
Not anymore though. From Guava 10: "Deprecated. This method suffers from poor symlink detection and race conditions. This functionality can be supported suitably only by shelling out to an operating system command such as rm -rf or del /s. This method is scheduled to be removed from Guava in Guava release 11.0." –  Trevor Robinson Dec 9 '11 at 21:56
4  
Too bad. Shelling out seems a little crude and not portable. If the Apache commons version works properly, then presumably it's not impossible to implement. –  Andrew McKinlay Dec 30 '11 at 22:50
    
@andrew The Apache Commons implementation should have similar problems to those that cause Guava to remove their implementation, see code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/issues/detail?id=365 –  orip May 20 '12 at 13:16
7  
If shelling out is so great, then I don't know why Guava can't just wrap that up as the deleteRecursively utility method. –  Trejkaz Jan 3 '13 at 2:41

A solution with a stack and without recursive methods:

File dir = new File("/path/to/dir");
File[] currList;
Stack<File> stack = new Stack<File>();
stack.push(dir);
while (! stack.isEmpty()) {
    if (stack.lastElement().isDirectory()) {
        currList = stack.lastElement().listFiles();
        if (currList.length > 0) {
            for (File curr: currList) {
                stack.push(curr);
            }
        } else {
            stack.pop().delete();
        }
    } else {
        stack.pop().delete();
    }
}
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1  
+1 for using a stack. This will work with directories that contain deep levels of nested subdirectories while the other stack-based approaches will fail. –  Nathan Osman Mar 10 '13 at 0:08
1  
Seeing that you usually don’t have problems nesting a couple of hundred method calls I think you’re likely to run into filesystem restrictions a lot earlier. –  Bombe Sep 14 '13 at 12:37
    
Be careful with the list* methods for class java.io.File. From the Javadocs: "Returns null if this abstract pathname does not denote a directory, or if an I/O error occurs." So: if (currList.length > 0) { becomes if (null != currList && currList.length > 0) { –  kevinarpe Nov 11 '13 at 11:01
static public void deleteDirectory(File path) 
{
    if (path == null)
        return;
    if (path.exists())
    {
        for(File f : path.listFiles())
        {
            if(f.isDirectory()) 
            {
                deleteDirectory(f);
                f.delete();
            }
            else
            {
                f.delete();
            }
        }
        path.delete();
    }
}
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Here you go...

  public void deleteRecursive(File path){
        File[] c = path.listFiles();
        System.out.println("Cleaning out folder:" + path.toString());
        for (File file : c){
            if (file.isDirectory()){
                System.Out.println("Deleting file:" + file.toString());
                deleteRecursive(file);
                file.delete();
            } else {
                file.delete();
            }
        }

        path.delete();
  }
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1  
Enhanced version with boolean return value and no duplication: pastebin.com/PqJyzQUx –  Erik Allik Mar 5 at 21:17
    
Is the file.delete(); call just after deleteRecursive(file) excess because the function is recursive and the last thing you do in it is delete the path that was passed in? I like this answer, it seems like most people are putting up Apache's commons-io answers which is like answering with jQuery to javascript questions. –  Programster May 4 at 9:43

Two ways to fail with symlinks and the above code... and don't know the solution.

Way #1

Run this to create a test:

echo test > testfile
mkdir dirtodelete
ln -s badlink dirtodelete/badlinktodelete

Here you see your test file and test directory:

$ ls testfile dirtodelete
testfile

dirtodelete:
linktodelete

Then run your commons-io deleteDirectory(). It crashes saying the file is not found. Not sure what the other examples do here. The Linux rm command would simply delete the link, and rm -r on the directory would also.

Exception in thread "main" java.io.FileNotFoundException: File does not exist: /tmp/dirtodelete/linktodelete

Way #2

Run this to create a test:

mkdir testdir
echo test > testdir/testfile
mkdir dirtodelete
ln -s ../testdir dirtodelete/dirlinktodelete

Here you see your test file and test directory:

$ ls dirtodelete testdir
dirtodelete:
dirlinktodelete

testdir:
testfile

Then run your commons-io deleteDirectory() or the example code people posted. It deletes not only the directory, but your testfile which is outside the directory being deleted. (It dereferences the directory implicitly, and deletes the contents). rm -r would delete the link only. You need to use something like this delete the dereferenced files: "find -L dirtodelete -type f -exec rm {} \;".

$ ls dirtodelete testdir
ls: cannot access dirtodelete: No such file or directory
testdir:
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Java 7 introduces new classes which make recursive delete from file system really easy. You can find recursive delete example here. Many low level activities are supported in nio package.

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Maybe a solution for this problem might be to reimplement the delete method of the File class using the code from erickson's answer:

public class MyFile extends File {

  ... <- copy constructor

  public boolean delete() {
    if (f.isDirectory()) {
      for (File c : f.listFiles()) {
        return new MyFile(c).delete();
      }
    } else {
        return f.delete();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I think it's implemented as it is to mimic the behavior of most command shell utilities like "rm", "rmdir", and "del". Of the two alternatives, the current implementation definitely minimizes the overall surprise (and anger) potential. It isn't going to change. –  erickson Apr 22 '09 at 22:50
1  
Generally, the only Java JRE packages I see extended are from Swing. Usually, extending other classes such as java.io.File is a bad idea, as it has the possibility to cause things to act in unexpected ways. –  Eddie Apr 22 '09 at 23:20
2  
@Eddie's right. You're also wasting cycles creating MyFile classes that aren't needed if you made the method static. *Also, I don't think this actually deletes the directory, just the files within. you'll end up with a tree of directories with no files in them. I'd go with @Steve K's solution above this one - you shouldn't have to maintain/debug code like this if it's readily available from a common framework library like apache commons. –  Kevin Williams Apr 23 '09 at 1:39

Here is a bare bones main method that accepts a command line argument, you may need to append your own error checking or mold it to how you see fit.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.IOException;

public class DeleteFiles {

/**
 * @param intitial arguments take in a source to read from and a 
 * destination to read to
 */
    public static void main(String[] args)
                     throws FileNotFoundException,IOException {
        File src = new File(args[0]);
        if (!src.exists() ) {
            System.out.println("FAILURE!");
        }else{
            // Gathers files in directory
            File[] a = src.listFiles();
            for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
                //Sends files to recursive deletion method
                fileDelete(a[i]);
            }
            // Deletes original source folder
            src.delete();
            System.out.println("Success!");
        }
    }

    /**
     * @param srcFile Source file to examine
     * @throws FileNotFoundException if File not found
     * @throws IOException if File not found
     */
    private static void fileDelete(File srcFile)
                     throws FileNotFoundException, IOException {
        // Checks if file is a directory
        if (srcFile.isDirectory()) {
            //Gathers files in directory
            File[] b = srcFile.listFiles();
            for (int i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
                //Recursively deletes all files and sub-directories
                fileDelete(b[i]);
            }
            // Deletes original sub-directory file
            srcFile.delete();
        } else {
            srcFile.delete();
        }
    }
}

I hope that helps!

share|improve this answer
    
YOur error messages are really poor, if i come back and run this in a years time what does failure mean ? Why not actually include a real description in the two messages... –  mP. Apr 23 '09 at 21:46
    
I did not intend for this to be exhaustive. Like I posted, this is a bare bones example that may be manipulated to how one sees fit. If I were to actually write this for myself, I would definitely have more error checking and more descriptive messages. However, I agree that it may have been needed to point out the necessity of better descriptions, so, thanks! –  glue Apr 23 '09 at 21:55

You could use:

org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.deleteQuietly(destFile);

Deletes a file, never throwing an exception. If file is a directory, delete it and all sub-directories. The difference between File.delete() and this method are: A directory to be deleted does not have to be empty. No exceptions are thrown when a file or directory cannot be deleted.

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for(Path p : Files.walk(directoryToDelete).
        sorted((a, b) -> b.compareTo(a)). // reverse; files before dirs
        toArray(Path[]::new))
{
    Files.delete(p);
}

Or if you want to handle the IOException:

Files.walk(directoryToDelete).
    sorted((a, b) -> b.compareTo(a)). // reverse; files before dirs
    forEach(p -> {
        try { Files.delete(p); }
        catch(IOException e) { /* ... */ }
      });
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