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Hey there I'm using a binary search method to find a number in an array, and I'm getting a StackOverflow error when looking for a number other than the one in the middle.

Here is my code:

public static  <T extends Comparable< ? super T>>
    int find(T [] a, T x, int low, int high){
    if(low>high)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    int tmp = (high-low)/2;

    if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)==0)
        return tmp;
    else if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)>0)
        find(a,x,tmp,high);
    else if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)<0)
        find(a,x,low,tmp);
    return -1;
}

Also, if I try to look for a number under tmp, it returns -1. I feel like I'm missing something but can't figure out what. Thanks in advanced!

share|improve this question
3  
StackOverflow... This is the right place. Sorry, couldn't pass app on the irony. –  chr Oct 17 '11 at 16:32
    
@chr lol... I thought about it myself while I was writing it xD –  randomizertech Oct 17 '11 at 16:34
    
That's coincidence, not irony ;) Irony would be if he wrote some code that detects stackoverflows, but that code ended up causing a stackoverflow in his code. –  Vivin Paliath Oct 17 '11 at 16:34
2  
How ironic: coincidence mistaken for irony. –  dlev Oct 17 '11 at 16:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is the problem:

if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)>0)
    find(a,x,tmp,high);
else if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)<0)
    find(a,x,low,tmp);

You should be using tmp + 1 in the first case and tmp - 1 in the second. Otherwise if you've got (say) low = 0, high = 1 then you'll potentially end up perpetually calling with the same arguments; tmp will end up being 0, and if x is more than a[0] you'll just call find(a, x, 0, 1) again.

That's my gut feeling, anyway. You should really log what happens in terms of the low/high values being used - I'm sure you'll see some sort of repetition before it croaks.

EDIT: You've also got the comparison round the wrong way. a[tmp].compareTo(x) will return a value less than 0 if a[tmp] is less than x - i.e. you ought to look later in the array, not earlier.

EDIT: Currently your "exit with -1" code is broken - you'll only ever return -1 if a[tmp].compareTo(x) returns a non-zero value which is neither above zero nor below zero. I challenge you to find such an integer :) (It would also do it if compareTo were unstable, but that's a separate issue...)

One option is to detect if high == low - at that point, if you haven't hit the right value, you can return -1:

int comparison = a[tmp].compareTo(x); // Let's just compare once...
if (comparison == 0) {
   return tmp;
}
// This was our last chance!
if (high == low) {
   return -1;
}
// If a[tmp] was lower than x, look later in the array. If it was higher than
// x, look earlier in the array.
return comparison < 0 ? find(a, x, tmp + 1, high) : find(a, x, low, tmp - 1);
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I thought too, but then I get a IllegalArgumentException –  randomizertech Oct 17 '11 at 16:37
    
@fgualda87: Think about the circumstances in which you'd return -1... will edit. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 16:38
    
well, it would return -1 when the element x im trying to find is not in the array, all other times it should return the index in which the element x is at –  randomizertech Oct 17 '11 at 16:39
    
@fgualda87: No, your current code wouldn't return -1. Try to work out any code path (where compareTo is stable) such that it wouldn't take one of the if branches. See my edit. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 16:42
1  
@fualda87: Now would be a good time to apply some diagnostic and debugging skills then. Take it step by step, work out what you'd expect it to do etc. (I've actually found and fixed the problem in my answer - I'd copied some bad logic in your original code. But see if you can work it out without that...) –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 17:00

You need:

else if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)>0)
    find(a,x,tmp - 1,high);
else if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)<0)
    find(a,x,low,tmp + 1);

Otherwise you'll basically end up recursively calling the function with the same arguments when you have low = 0 and high = 1 for example. The thing is that you don't really need to look at the element at mid again because you already know if it is greater or smaller in relation to the value you are trying to find.

Also, instead of the IllegalArgumentException, you should return -1 if high is lesser than low.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it's reasonable to throw an exception in this case - if the method is public. However, either the "no match" option can be detected after the comparison (see my answer) or there could be a public method without the high/low part, and a private implementation which returned -1 appropriately. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 16:43
    
@JonSkeet That's a good point. –  Vivin Paliath Oct 17 '11 at 16:46
public static  <T extends Comparable< ? super T>>
    int find(T [] a, T x, int low, int high){
    if(low>high)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    int tmp = (high+low)/2;//replaced - with + for average

    if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)==0)
        return tmp;
    else if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)>0)
        return find(a,x,tmp,high); //return the found index
    else if(a[tmp].compareTo(x)<0)
        return find(a,x,low,tmp);
    return -1;
}

if tmp is the average of high and low you need to add them and then divide by 2

also return the found value on the recursive call

share|improve this answer
    
you are right on the + sign. thanks! I was thinking from 0 to 100 and if I wanna do it from 250 to 270 the average would be 260 while having the - sign would give me 10. Thanks! –  randomizertech Oct 17 '11 at 16:48

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