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I have a "sum" class which holds two references to existing ints (say). I want to create a "copy" method which deep copies the ints. I thought I would never have to manually delete objects in my code, thanks to smart pointers, but I had to in this solution. Moreover, it is too complicated for a so trivial task (which I need to repeat for several classes). Is there a more straightforward solution?

Note: I don't want to add a bool member (flag) to each objects to determine if the ints must be deleted (in my case, it's not a better overhead than the std::set check overhead in the destructor)

#include <set>

struct sum {
   const int &a, &b;
   static std::set<const int*> allocated_ints;

   sum(const int& a, const int&b): a(a), b(b) {}

   sum copy() const {
       sum res(*new const int(a), *new const int(b));
       allocated_ints.insert(&res.a);
       allocated_ints.insert(&res.b);
       return res;
   }

   ~sum() {
       if (allocated_ints.count(&this->a)) {
           delete &this->a;
           delete &this->b;
           allocated_ints.erase(&this->a);
           allocated_ints.erase(&this->b);
       }
   }

};

std::set<const int*> sum::allocated_ints;
share|improve this question
2  
You should not be deleting these references. – John Dibling Oct 17 '11 at 16:54
1  
Show us a use case. – John Dibling Oct 17 '11 at 16:54
    
@rafak: Your code takes references to ints, which means they are "owned" by some other class, and your class should not delete them. If they aren't "owned" by some other class, then you should not be storing the ints by reference. – Mooing Duck Oct 17 '11 at 17:16
    
What smart pointers are you talking about? I don't see any smart pointers in your code. (References aren't smart pointers, if that's what you were thinking.) – fredoverflow Oct 17 '11 at 17:26
    
@John: I put my use case as a comment of Kerrek SB's answer. I need to delete the reference when they are allocated from within the class. – rafak Oct 17 '11 at 17:27

What's the point of a "deep" copy of constants? The constants are going to have the same value no matter what! So just copy (i.e. alias) the const-references:

struct Foo
{
  const int & n;

  Foo(const int & m) : n(m) { }
  Foo(const Foo & rhs) : n(rhs.n) { }

  Foo copy() const { Foo f(*this); /* ... */ return f; }
  // ...
};

If you're worried about dangling references when returning a copy from a function with a reference to a local variable, then don't make the class have const references, but copies. That way you naturally give your class the copy semantics that you seem to be after anyway.

If you were thinking that you could make a hybrid which is either non-owning or becomes owning depending on how you use it, then I'd say that's bad design that you should avoid. Decide whether your class has ownership over the data or not and then roll with it.

share|improve this answer
    
it is mostly a reference semantic. Here is my use case: int n=1; Foo foo(n); /* compute with foo, but manipulating n directly /; if (foo.is_intersting()) Foo good_foo = foo.copy(); / go on computation with foo, changing the value of n... */ (so the const-ness of the reference is not very relevant to my problem). Note: "C" comments don't display well – rafak Oct 17 '11 at 17:22
    
Hm, somehow this looks like poor encapsulation to me. I'd either make n a parameter, lile foo.compute(n);, or I'd make the entire logic which modifies n part of the class. Then you can make a straight copy of the object once you've hit an interesting state. – Kerrek SB Oct 17 '11 at 17:32
1  
That's a bad idea, for the case of Foo func() {return Foo(1);}. This would return a Foo with a dangling reference, causing undefined behavior. The class should make it's own local copy, unless you can guarantee the ints are in scope longer than Foo. Also, they can't "change the value of n", since they keep the references as const. – Mooing Duck Oct 17 '11 at 17:33
    
... otherwise this just really gets ugly. You're asking for a single variable to which other parts of your code hold references, but you also want to make archival copies of that variable. That's no good. Maybe better to make a container that allows for persistent references, like so: list<int> nvals; nvals.push_back(1); while(computing) { Foo current_foo(nvals.back()); if(good) { Foo good_foo(current_foo); nvals.push_back(nvals.back()); } This isn't quite right, but you get the idea: maintain a list of values whose last one is the current one, and previous ones are the archive. – Kerrek SB Oct 17 '11 at 17:37
    
@MooingDuck: Well, as I was saying, the OP's strongly coupled design is awkward and causes these complications. I'm willing to bet that there's a better overall approach that makes all those problems go away. – Kerrek SB Oct 17 '11 at 17:38

I think you're mixing-up two incompatible concepts.

If you initialize by reference you should refer to existing object whose lifetime is already defined and should be longer than your objects.

If you want to create a copy of your object, since it refers to something, your copy will also refer to that something.

If you want to own yourself dynamic supplied objects, you should use pointers for that, and acquire them as pointers (and delete them on destruction). A copy can then deep-create copies of the pointed objects (or can share them using reference counting or shared_ptr).

You are -in fact- making up a mixing of the two things, resulting in possible problems: think to:

int main()
{
    const int x=5; //whatever it is
    Foo foo(x);
    // ...
} //danger here! ~Foo() will delete x
share|improve this answer

The references are not deep copied, because they point to an object. Therefore, your code fixed should look like this :

struct sum {
   const int &a, &b;

   sum(const int& a, const int&b): a(a), b(b) {}

   sum copy() const {
       sum res(a,b);
       return res;
   }

   ~sum() {
   }

};
share|improve this answer
    
But I need the copy to have "references" to new objects. Your version of copy is like the default copy constructor. – rafak Oct 17 '11 at 18:47
    
@rafak In that case, change the references to pointers (better yet smart pointers), or remove the reference (make them the objects). The above is how the references are copied. – BЈовић Oct 17 '11 at 19:24

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