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I have several threads running concurrently and each of them must generate random numbers. I want to understand if there is a pattern to follow, to understand if it is correct to initialize the random generator with srand in the main thread or if every thread must initialize its own random generator. It seems that rand/srand have not been designed to be used with threads and I'm wondering how I can deal with threads and random numbers together. Thanks

EDIT: I need pure random numbers, but I'm also interested in generating a deterministic sequence for testing purposes. I'm on linux, but I prefer to write code as portable as possible.

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Do you want the sequence to be deterministic or not? - stackoverflow.com/questions/6467585/… –  Flexo Oct 17 '11 at 18:01
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If you have no special requirements, use rand_r. –  David Schwartz Oct 17 '11 at 18:02
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rand() is thread safe on linux but is not required to be so by posix, though posix provides rand_r for that purpose. glibc uses an internal mutex for its rand() - which might cause contention if your threads generate a lot of random numbers –  nos Oct 17 '11 at 19:13
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

On Linux you can use the rand_r() for a mediocre generator or the drand48_r() function for a much better one. Both are thread safe replacements for rand() and drand48(), by taking a single argument consisting of the current state, instead of using global state.

With regard to your question on initialization, both of the generators above allow you to seed at whatever point you desire, so you are not forced to seed them before spawning your threads.

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rand_r is obsolete since POSIX 2008. I don't know why, but would love to. –  con-f-use Mar 28 at 16:50
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When working with threads and doing e.g simulations or so it is very important that you have the random generators independent. First, dependencies between them can really bias your results and then mechanisms for access control to the state of the random generator will most likely slow down execution.

On POSIX systems (where you seem to be) there is the *rand48 family of functions where erand48, nrand48 and jrand48 take the state of the random generator as input values. So you can easily have independent states in each thread. Those you can initialize with a known number (e.g the number of your thread) and you'd have a reproducible sequence of random numbers. Or you initialize it with something non-predicable such as the current time & the number to have sequences that vary for each execution.

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On Windows you can use the rand_s() function, which is thread safe. If you are already using Boost, then boost::random is competent (although I appreciate this is tagged C, not C++).

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This link provides some code for reading from /dev/random -- which should be thread-safe -- and the question is along the same lines:

Is reading /dev/urandom thread-safe?

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