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Hi guys i have a a string like this

String main = "Sandy \"children\":[]"
String foo = "\"children\":[]";

main = main.replaceAll(foo, "");

If I want to replace the whole foo in main with a single character "" then what regex I need to use?

I ll be having a json data like this i need to replace all the empty children object

{"data" : "Search engines",
                    "children":[ {
                    "data":"Yahoo","children":[{"data":"1","children":[{}]}]},
                    {"data":"Bing","children":[{"data":"2","children":[]}]},{"data":"Bing2"},{"data":"Bing3"},{"data":"Bing4"},{"data":"Bing5"},{"data":"Bing6"},{"data":"Bing7"},{"data":"Bing34"}]                    
                    }
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1  
"" isn't a single character - it's an empty string. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 18:26
    
Why do you want to remove the empty children? –  Sahil Muthoo Oct 17 '11 at 18:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Okay, now you've given more information, I would thoroughly recommend not using regular expressions for this. Parse the JSON and use the DOM representation of it instead. Otherwise there are bound to be ways of fooling whatever you use. Text representations like this are simply not a good match for regular expressions IMO.


(Original answer...)

It's not clear why you're using replaceAll and regular expressions in the first place.

I suspect you just want:

main = main.replace(foo, "");

That will treat foo as a normal string, not a regular expression. Unless you really want to use a regular expression, use replace instead of replaceAll.

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actually i ll be having whole lot of paranthesis in my actual string –  karthick Oct 17 '11 at 18:28
    
@karthick: But do you actually want to treat them as a regular expression or not? Currently your question is very unclear. Giving some sample inputs and desired outputs would be useful. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 18:29
    
@@Jon: I have edited my question –  karthick Oct 17 '11 at 18:31
    
@@Jon: Sorry jon i understood your point thanks for explaining –  karthick Oct 17 '11 at 18:34
    
@karthick: Have edited my answer - basically, don't do this. Use a JSON parser instead. Btw, you don't need to use "@@". Just "@Jon" will notify me... (or not even that, when you're adding a comment to my answer). –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 18:43

you can use Pattern.quote(String) to ensure everything is counted as literal in the regex

main = main.replaceAll(Pattern.quote(foo), "");
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I'm not sure if I understand your question still and parsing as JSON, then manipulating as JavaScript might be the answer... but if you want to turn this:

{"data" : "Search engines",
                "children":[ {
                "data":"Yahoo","children":[{"data":"1","children":[{}]}]},
                {"data":"Bing","children":[{"data":"2","children":[]}]},{"data":"Bing2"},{"data":"Bing3"},{"data":"Bing4"},{"data":"Bing5"},{"data":"Bing6"},{"data":"Bing7"},{"data":"Bing34"}]                    
                }

into this:

{"data" : "Search engines",
                "children":[ {
                "data":"Yahoo","children":[{"data":"1"}]},
                {"data":"Bing","children":[{"data":"2"}]},{"data":"Bing2"},{"data":"Bing3"},{"data":"Bing4"},{"data":"Bing5"},{"data":"Bing6"},{"data":"Bing7"},{"data":"Bing34"}]                    
                }

Then use this expression:

",?\"children\":\\[(\\{\\})?]"

as in the following code (Wow, I think this is right, but it's been a while...):

String main = "Sandy \"children\":[]"
String foo = ",?\"children\":\\[(\\{\\})?]";

main = main.replaceAll(foo, "");
//main == "Sandy "
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oh wait - you said Java! hmmmm...... –  Code Jockey Oct 17 '11 at 19:12

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