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I am finally getting around to writing stuff in cfscript, and so I am starting with writing some needed formatting functions. Here is an example:

    Function FormatBoolean(MyBool, Format) { 

    Switch(Format){
        Case "YES/NO":{
            If (MyBool eq 1)
                Return "YES";
            Else
                Return "NO";
            Break;
        }

        Default:{
            If (MyBool eq 1)
                Return "Yes";
            Else
                Return "";
            Break;
        }
    }
}

What I would like to do is make Format an optional argument. If you don't include the argument, the function will currently still run, but it won't find format, and it seems that cfparam did not get translated to cfscript.

Will I just have to check if Format is defined and give it a value? Or is there a nicer way of doing this?

Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Personally I prefer to set defaults to this kind of arguments. Also I've refactored function a bit... But not tested :)

function FormatBoolean(required any MyBool, string Format = "") { 

    switch(arguments.Format) {
        case "YES/NO":
            return YesNoFormat(arguments.MyBool EQ 1);
        default:
            return (arguments.MyBool eq 1) ? "Yes" : "";
    }

}

Please note that (arguments.MyBool EQ 1) may be replaced with (arguments.MyBool), so it covers all boolean values. You may be interested to make it more reliable, something like this (isValid("boolean", arguments.MyBool) AND arguments.MyBool) -- this should allow to check any value at all.

share|improve this answer
    
I deleted my earlier comments, because this is correct (i was looking at the wrong columns before) Thanks for suc a simple and clean solution! – Limey Oct 17 '11 at 19:46
    
Just keep in mind the results of (arguments.MyBool) and (arguments.MyBool eq 1) are slightly different. – Leigh Oct 17 '11 at 21:08
    
@Leigh Isn't it the same I was saying in second part of my answer? :) – Sergii Oct 17 '11 at 21:39
    
@Sergii - No wonder you were asking what was different :) I thought I added an example to my earlier comment, like "(arguments.MyBool) will treat negative numbers as true". But I can see it is not there ;) Ooops. – Leigh Oct 17 '11 at 23:29

All variables passed into a function are available to access programmatically via the ARGUMENTS scope. You can refer to it as if it were an array (because it is), as well as standard struct key access (which I've done for you below for the MyBool parameter):

<cfscript>
    Function FormatBoolean(MyBool) { 

    var theFormat = '';

    if (ArrayLen(ARGUMENTS) GT 1)
        theFormat = ARGUMENTS[2];

    Switch(theFormat){
        Case "YES/NO":{
            If (ARGUMENTS.MyBool eq 1)
                Return "YES";
            Else
                Return "NO";
            Break;
        }

        Default:{
            If (ARGUMENTS.MyBool eq 1)
                Return "Yes";
            Else
                Return "";
            Break;
        }
    }
}
</cfscript>

Add your preferred additional levels of data validation as necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
I see what you are doing, but it isn't really the cleanest way about it, is it? Think about trying to use this method if you needed 4 or 5 inputs. All function definitions would have just one variable and you would need to look into the code of the function to see what really needs to be passed in. – Limey Oct 17 '11 at 19:42
    
This is how you do it in a cfscript block. If you want a cleaner approach, you'll have to go back to <cffunction> and specify all of your arguments by name, with a 'required' of false...but you will still have to programmatically check for their existence before you access their data. – Shawn Holmes Oct 17 '11 at 19:55
    
This also works for versions of CF back to 5. Sergii's solution requires CF 8 (I believe). – Al E. Oct 17 '11 at 20:19
    
Thanks for the vote. I'm still mulling how I want to respond to the difference between optional parameters and named arguments with default values--which are two different concepts, and have been mixed up in this q/a...but also do not want to muddy the fact that a clear workaround was supplied. – Shawn Holmes Oct 17 '11 at 21:04
    
I think optional arguments in cfscript didn't happen until cf 9. – enigment Mar 27 '12 at 21:44

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