Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to figure out a way to emulate AS3's Timer class.

If you're not familiar, one of the cool things you can do is add duration to the timer even if it's already running. This functionality has a lot of very nice uses.

Anyone have any thoughts on doing this in js?

share|improve this question
    
Fun question! +1 –  Ryan Kinal Oct 17 '11 at 19:59
    
yeah my +1 was because of that also : –  fmsf Oct 17 '11 at 20:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm not familiar with this class, but you can easily create something similar in JavaScript:

function Timer(callback, time) {
    this.setTimeout(callback, time);
}

Timer.prototype.setTimeout = function(callback, time) {
    var self = this;
    if(this.timer) {
        clearTimeout(this.timer);
    }
    this.finished = false;
    this.callback = callback;
    this.time = time;
    this.timer = setTimeout(function() {
         self.finished = true;
        callback();
    }, time);
    this.start = Date.now();
}

Timer.prototype.add = function(time) {
   if(!this.finished) {
       // add time to time left
       time = this.time - (Date.now() - this.start) + time;
       this.setTimeout(this.callback, time);
   }
}

Usage:

var timer = new Timer(function() { // init timer with 5 seconds
    alert('foo');
}, 5000);

timer.add(2000); // add two seconds
share|improve this answer

I decided to throw my little rubber ducky into the pool.

var setTimeout2 = function(callback, delay) {
    this.complete = false;
    this.callback = callback;
    this.delay = delay;
    this.timeout = false;
    this.dotimeout = function() {
        this.timeout = setTimeout(function() {
            this.complete = true;
            this.callback.call();
        }, this.delay);
    };
    this.start = Date.now();
    this.add = function(delay) {
        if (!this.complete) {
            this.delay = this.delay - (Date.now() - this.start) + delay;
            clearTimeout(this.timeout);
            this.dotimeout.call();
        }
    };
    return this;
};

usage

var start = Date.now();
var to = setTimeout2(function() {
    document.write(Date.now() - start);
}, 3000);
to.add(3000);

similar to this approach but a little more compact / no proto

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with your approach is that this will refer to window, polluting the global namespace... did you mean to write new setTimeout2...? –  Felix Kling Oct 17 '11 at 20:56
    
ahh, i meant to put something different. hold on. –  rlemon Oct 17 '11 at 21:34
    
nvm, i'll have to re-produce it later. the fiddle never saved.. –  rlemon Oct 17 '11 at 21:40
    
np, I just wanted to point it out :) Sometimes we just overlook things... –  Felix Kling Oct 17 '11 at 21:41

Here's my shot. It keeps track of when the timer was set, and adds the difference to the specified time when you add time.

var Timer = {
    set: function(p_function, p_time)
    {
        var d = new Date();
        this.timeStarted = d.getTime();
        this.func = p_function;
        this.timeout = setTimeout(p_function, p_time);
        console.log('timer started at ' + (this.timeStarted / 1000) + ' seconds');
    },
    add: function(p_time)
    {
        var d = new Date(),
            diff = d.getTime() - this.timeStarted,
            newTime = diff + p_time;

        if (this.timeout)
        {
            clearTimeout(this.timeout);
        }

        this.timeout = setTimeout(this.func, newTime);
        this.timeStarted = d.getTime();
    }
};

var myTimer = Object.create(Timer);
myTimer.set(function() {
    var d = new Date();
    console.log('Timer fired at ' + (d.getTime() / 1000) + ' seconds');
}, 10000);

setTimeout(function () {
    myTimer.add(5000);
}, 5000);

Here's a jsFiddle

Please note that due to overhead of calculation and function calls, this may be a couple milliseconds off.

share|improve this answer

There you go hope it helps :) just call setInterval with the time you want to have.

Edit: added stop and start in case you want to stop your loop :p

function Timer(defaultInterval, callback){
   var interval = defaultInterval;
   var running = true;
   function loop(){
     callback();
     if(running){
        setTimeout(function(){
           loop();
        }, interval);
     }
   }

   loop();
   return {
     setInterval: function(newInterval){
        interval = newInterval;
     },
     stop: function(){
         running = false;
     },
     start: function(){
          if(running===false){
             running = true;
             loop();
          }
     },
     add: function(milliToAdd){
          interval += milliToAdd*1;
     }

   }
}

var myTimer = Timer(250, function() { process code here });
myTimer.setInterval(1000); // sets interval to 1 second
myTimer.stop(); // stops the function
myTimer.start(); // re-starts the loop;
share|improve this answer
    
I wrote the object on the fly directly into the answer box so if it has any syntactical error, sorry, but it should be easy to fix :) –  fmsf Oct 17 '11 at 19:49
    
nvm made a quick test and it seems to be running ok :) –  fmsf Oct 17 '11 at 19:51

Wrap the function with another one, and when the timer runs out, test to see if an extra time variable has been set. If it has, start again with the new time, otherwise execute the function.

A quickly hacked together script might look like:

function test() {
    tim = new timer(function () { alert('hello'); }, 5000);   
}

function extend() {
    if (tim) { tim.addTime(5000); }   
}

function timer(func, time) {
    var self = this,
        execute = function () {
            self.execute()  
        };
    this.func = func;
    this.extraTime = 0;
    setTimeout(execute, time);
};

timer.prototype.execute = function () {
    var self = this,
        execute = function () {
            self.execute()  
        };
    if (this.extraTime) {
        setTimeout(execute, this.extraTime);
        this.extraTime = 0;
    } else {
        this.func();   
    }
};

timer.prototype.addTime = function (time) {
    this.extraTime += time;   
}

<input type="button" value="Start" onclick="test()">
<input type="button" value="Extend" onclick="extend()">
share|improve this answer

Clear the timeout, then set a new timeout to the new desired end time.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.