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How can I pass a arbitrary number of arguments to the class constructor using the Object() function defined below?

<?php

/*
./index.php
*/

function Object($object)
{
    static $instance = array();

    if (is_file('./' . $object . '.php') === true)
    {
    	$class = basename($object);

    	if (array_key_exists($class, $instance) === false)
    	{
    		if (class_exists($class, false) === false)
    		{
    			require('./' . $object . '.php');
    		}

    		/*
    		How can I pass custom arguments, using the
    		func_get_args() function to the class constructor?

    		$instance[$class] = new $class(func_get_arg(1), func_get_arg(2), ...);
    		*/

    		$instance[$class] = new $class();
    	}

    	return $instance[$class];
    }

    return false;
}

/*
How do I make this work?
*/

Object('libraries/DB', 'DATABASE', 'USERNAME', 'PASSWORD')->Query(/* Some Query */);

/*
./libraries/DB.php
*/

class DB
{
    public function __construct($database, $username, $password, $host = 'localhost', $port = 3306)
    {
    	// do stuff here
    }
}

?>
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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted
$klass = new ReflectionClass($classname);
$thing = $klass->newInstanceArgs($args);

Although the need to use reflection suggests that you are overcomplicating something in your design. Why do you want to write this function in the first place?

share|improve this answer
    
I admit this function may seem a bit nonsense but I use it for small stuff where a framework may be too bloated. And since it acts as an "autoloader", object constructor and singleton container it does the job perfectly. –  Alix Axel Apr 24 '09 at 2:04
    
BTW, that Reflection class is really handy, is there any crash course available on the new features of PHP 5.3? I checked the PHP manual but is it me or it is lacking a lot of documentation? –  Alix Axel Apr 24 '09 at 2:10
    
It's not you: The documentation is rather sparse on that. You'll have to do with php.net/oop5.reflection. Also, it has been around since 5.1 (or is it 5.0?), so it's not a new feature of 5.3 –  troelskn Apr 24 '09 at 8:28

Instead of your class taking separated parameters I'd have it take an array.

class DB
{
    public function __construct(array $params)
    {
        // do stuff here
    }
}

That way you can pass the direct result of the func_get_args into your constructor. The only problem now is being able to figure out the array key / values.

If anyone else has any ideas I'd also be delighted to know :)

share|improve this answer
    
I got the same idea as well but I was curious to know if something like I described could be done. –  Alix Axel Apr 23 '09 at 1:32

I haven't tried this, but call_user_func_array sounds like you want.

$thing = call_user_func_array(array($classname, '__construct'), $args);

Have a look in the PHP Documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work. =\ call_user_func_array(array(new $classname(), '__construct'), $args); This works but then I would be calling the constructor twice. –  Alix Axel Apr 23 '09 at 4:43
    
Try it without new $classname(). –  staticsan Apr 23 '09 at 5:06
    
Fatal error: Non-static method test::__construct() cannot be called statically –  Alix Axel Apr 26 '09 at 8:36
    
Okay, I've got no more ideas. Thanks for being willing to try. –  staticsan Apr 26 '09 at 23:29

An alternative for the reflection method, would be evaluate your code.

eval('$instance = new className('.implode(', ', $args).');');
share|improve this answer
    
Eval is pretty much always a bad idea –  Nitroware Mar 9 '13 at 5:16

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