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I'm testing exceptions with nose. Here's an example:

def testDeleteUserUserNotFound(self):
    "Test exception is raised when trying to delete non-existent users"
    try:
        self.client.deleteUser('10000001-0000-0000-1000-100000000000')
        # make nose fail here
    except UserNotFoundException:
        assert True

The assert is executed if the exception is raised, but if no exception is raised, it won't be executed.

Is there anything I can put on the commented line above so that if no exception is raised nose will report a failure? There are ways I can think of to hack it, but what's the "proper" way of doing this?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

nose provides tools for testing exceptions (like unittest does). Try this example (and read about the other tools at Nose Testing Tools

from nose.tools import *

l = []
d = dict()

@raises(Exception)
def test_Exception1():
    '''this test should pass'''
    l.pop()

@raises(KeyError)
def test_Exception2():
    '''this test should pass'''
    d[1]

@raises(KeyError)
def test_Exception3():
    '''this test should fail (IndexError raised but KeyError was expected)'''
    l.pop()

def test_Exception4():
    '''this test should fail with KeyError'''
    d[1]

I would think that this is the proper way that you were looking for because it lets you be specific about the exceptions that you expect or want. So you actually provoke the error to see that it raises the right exception. And then you let nose evaluate the result. (Put as little logic into the unit tests as possible!)

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Thanks. There's 'assert_raises' as well by the looks of things. –  BartD Nov 26 '11 at 11:42
    
nose also exposes the assert_raises which is just self.assertRaises from unittest. That one is convenient for when you need to do more with the exception in the form. with assertRaises(ValueError) as e: <stuff> –  Jorge Vargas May 17 '12 at 3:23
def testDeleteUserUserNotFound(self):
    "Test exception is raised when trying to delete non-existent users"
    try:
        self.client.deleteUser('10000001-0000-0000-1000-100000000000')
        assert False # <---
    except UserNotFoundException:
        assert True

The semantics of try/except imply that the flow of execution leaves the try block on an exception, so assert False will not run if an exception is raised. Also, execution will not re-enter the try block again after the except block is done running, so you shouldn't run into trouble.

     ↓
(statements)
     ↓    exception
   (try) ↚──────────→ (except)
     ↓                   │
(statements) ←───────────┘
     ↓
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I don't know what nose is, but have you tried using 'else' after the except clause. I.e.

else:
    assert False
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