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Which of the following is more correct?

fi, path = tempfile.mkstemp()
f = os.fdopen(fi, "w")
f.write(res)
f.close()
os.close(fi)

or:

fi, path = tempfile.mkstemp()
f = os.fdopen(fi, "w")
f.write(res)
f.close()
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Check f.fileno(), it should be the same as fi. You should only ever close that file descriptor once, so the second is correct.

On Unix, the first causes an error:

>>> f.close()
>>> os.close(fi)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
OSError: [Errno 9] Bad file descriptor
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gotcha. a bit confusing: open twice, close once. but i get the idea –  Claudiu Oct 17 '11 at 21:48
1  
os.fdopen() does not necessarily open the file descriptor, it just returns an open file object for the file desciptor. If the file descriptor is already open it will not open it again. –  Andrew Clark Oct 17 '11 at 21:56
    
@Claudiu: It's because the OS makes a difference between file descriptors (which are OS-level objects), and file streams (which are libc-level objects). fopen (open in Python) opens a descriptor, then opens a stream using this descriptor. fdopen opens a new stream using an existing descriptor. fclose (file.close in Python) closes a stream and its underlying descriptor. –  millimoose Oct 17 '11 at 21:56

If on a sufficiently recent Python, you can golf this down to:

with os.fdopen(tempfile.mkstemp()[0]) as f:
    f.write(res)
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hehe nice, but i need the path in this case –  Claudiu Oct 17 '11 at 21:49

Continuing the follow-up on the most recent answers, if you need the path:

f_handle, f_path = tempfile.mkstemp()
with os.fdopen(f_handle, 'w') as f:
    f.write(res)

try:
    # Use path somehow
    some_function(f_path)

finally:
    # Clean up
    os.unlink(f_path)
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I would do:

fi, path = tempfile.mkstemp()
f = os.fdopen(fi, "w")
try:
  f.write(res)
finally:
  f.close()
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If you're going to write in the last example you'd need:

with os.fdopen(tempfile.mkstemp()[0], 'w') as f:
     f.write(res)
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