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I am trying to write a small program, that opens a server, creates a client that connects to this server and receives a message from it.

This is the Code so far

public static void main(String[] args) {
final ServerSocket serverSocket;
try {
    serverSocket = new ServerSocket(12345);
    Thread t = new Thread(){
        public void run(){
                try {
                    Socket server = serverSocket.accept();
                    PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(server.getOutputStream(), true);
                    writer.write("Hello World");
                    writer.flush();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        };
        t.start();
        Socket client = new Socket("localhost", 12345);
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(client.getInputStream()));
        String message = reader.readLine();

        System.out.println("Received " + message);
    } catch (IOException e1) {
        e1.printStackTrace();
    }

}

If i run program it keeps waiting in readLine() - so obviously the client does not receive the message from the server. Has anyone got an idea why this isn' working?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your reading thread is waiting for a newline in the data stream. Just change the server to use:

writer.write("Hello World\r\n");

and you'll get the result you were expecting. Alternatively, you can just close the server socket, and then readLine will return when it reaches the end of the data stream.

share|improve this answer
    
Better: change writer.write("Hello World"); to writer.println("Hello World"); –  Ryan Stewart Oct 17 '11 at 22:15
    
@RyanStewart: Possibly. I personally prefer to make the code less dependent on the platform default - when it comes to network protocols, it shouldn't matter whether the server happens to be running Windows or some flavour of Unix. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 22:17
    
True, though I suspect your option wouldn't work out so well on a Mac. If we're concerned about production-worthiness, the answer is to not use reader.readLine() for these exact reasons. That takes this example in a whole different direction, though. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 17 '11 at 22:20
1  
@RyanStewart: It should do - BufferedReader.readLine deliberately copes with all of \n, \r\n and \r I believe. (Just checked: "Reads a line of text. A line is considered to be terminated by any one of a line feed ('\n'), a carriage return ('\r'), or a carriage return followed immediately by a linefeed.") –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 22:23
    
True. I didn't realize that. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 17 '11 at 22:24

You should put the readline in a loop as follows:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final ServerSocket serverSocket;
    try {
        serverSocket = new ServerSocket(12345);
        Thread t = new Thread() {
            public void run() {
                try {
                    Socket server = serverSocket.accept();
                    PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(server.getOutputStream(), true);
                    writer.write("Hello World");
                    writer.flush();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        };
        t.start();
        Socket client = new Socket("localhost", 12345);
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(client.getInputStream()));
            // Check this --------------------------------------------------->
            String message = null;
            while ((message = in.readLine()) != null) {   
                    System.out.println("Received " + message);
                    break; //This break will exit the loop when the first message is sent by the server
            }

    } catch (IOException e1) {
        e1.printStackTrace();
    }

}

You can read this documentation for further explanation: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/networking/sockets/

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1  
That doesn't actually deal with the problem at all. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 17 '11 at 23:11

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