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I've seen mentions of improved PowerShell 3.0 syntax but not an example yet, how will it look like?

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What part of this was not helpful? It seems like you can download it. social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-AU/ITCG/thread/… –  S.Lott Oct 17 '11 at 22:14

3 Answers 3

Powershell does have a pretty clean syntax already, so there is not much that needs improvement.

One new addition that I do like is the Hash Table as objects, where you can create objects by passing hastable with its properties:

[<ClassName>]$Variable = @{<Property>=<Value>;<Property>=<Value>}

So the newer, more succinct way of creating custom objects is:

$obj = [PSCustomObject]@{a=1; b=2; c=3; d=4}

The redirection has been beefed up. You have now streams for verbose, debug and warning in addition to normal ( pipeline ) and error and so you can do redirections like 5>&1

You can use $PSDefaultParameterValues preference variable to set default parameter values for cmdlets.

There is the new [ordered] accelerator to create ordered hastable (dictionary):

 $a = [ordered]@{a=1;b=2;d=3;c=4}

From another answer here in SO, I realized that -in was new in Powershell v3.0:

So you do something like 1 -in 1,2,3. Previously we only had -contains

Cmdlets:

You can update help with Update-Help cmdlet. There are web related cmdlets like Invoke- WebRequest. You can also handle JSON using ConverTo-JSON and ConvertFrom-JSON cmdlets.

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"ordered hastable (dictionary)": I thought 'dictionary' and 'hashtable' were synonymous. Maybe I'm getting confused with Python dicts, but dictionaries don't impose order, do they? Can you clarify that? –  Iain Elder Dec 6 '13 at 12:45

Here's an example:

dir | where length -lt 10

Before 3.0, it would have been

dir | where {$_.length -lt 10}

edit: another example, this time with foreach-object

dir | foreach-object length

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+1 - Didn't even notice this before. –  manojlds Oct 18 '11 at 1:40
    
I agree with the submitter. This is something I expected to see some posts about, because it makes scripts a bit easier to read. I don't think I like it, though. –  Mike Shepard Oct 18 '11 at 1:43

A number of the common *-Object cmdlets utilize multiple parameter sets to accomplish the simplified syntax. Take a look at this in V3:

C:\PS> Get-Command Where-Object -Syntax

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] [-EQ] [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-FilterScript] <scriptblock> [-InputObject <psobject>] [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CGT [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CNE [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -LT [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CEQ [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -NE [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -GT [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CLT [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -GE [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CGE [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -LE [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CLE [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -Like [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CLike [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -NotLike [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CNotLike [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -Match [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CMatch [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -NotMatch [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CNotMatch [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -Contains [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CContains [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -NotContains [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CNotContains [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -In [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CIn [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -NotIn [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -CNotIn [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -Is [<CommonParameters>]

Where-Object [-Property] <string> [[-Value] <Object>] [-InputObject <psobject>] -IsNot [<CommonParameters>]

NOTE: Check out the new operators -NotIn and -In e.g.:

C:\PS> 1 -In 1..5
C:\PS> 10 -NotIn 1..5

So the simplified syntax is nice for the "common" case but watch out as you can fall off into the sharp rocks and lava pretty easily e.g.:

C:\PS> Get-ChildItem | Where LastWriteTime.Year -eq 2010

This returns nothing and even worse, there is no error so you think the result set is "correctly" empty when in fact this syntax just doesn't work as you might expect. That is, you can't access a property of a property. In the above, PowerShell looks for a property called LastWriteTime.Year which doesn't exist.

Also note that as part of the simplified syntax you can now use $PSItem in place of $_ in case you or those you write scripts for have some sort of allergic reaction to $_. :-)

And while this isn't necessarily tied to the simplified syntax I find that it simplifies my life and I love it:

C:\PS> Get-ChildItem -Directory
C:\PS> Get-ChildItem -File
C:\PS> dir -ad
C:\PS> Get-ChildItem -Attributes System+Hidden+Directory+!Archive
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+1 for $PSItem. BTW, how do you get to know about these things? Is the entire thing documented? –  manojlds Oct 18 '11 at 2:06
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Yeah, I am not liking the simplified syntax with where etc...more trouble than gain I think. –  manojlds Oct 18 '11 at 2:08
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I'm a bit worried about the simplified syntax myself. I understand the desire to make it easier for admins to get onto PowerShell but I'm not sure this is anything more than a bait & switch. Time will tell I guess. As far as finding out about these things, being an MVP has its privileges. :-) Seriously though, the interaction between the PowerShell team and their MVPs has been quite good since they started awarding MVPs in PowerShell back in 2006. –  Keith Hill Oct 18 '11 at 2:12
    
$PSItem - is it a separate variable with the same value as $_ or is this an "alias"? If in a pipeline I change $PSItem or $_ then is another one changed as well automatically? –  Roman Kuzmin Oct 18 '11 at 8:14
    
Great answer, is there a document / blog post describing all these changes at one place? –  Borek Oct 18 '11 at 10:32

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