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The function has a problem: 

void myAllo(int mySize, char *myChar )
{
    myChar = new char[mySize];
}

Will the heap allocation be returned from myAllo() ? I do not think so, because memory pointed by myChar will be deallocated when myAllo returns.

Right ?

Any comments are welcome.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
myChar is a parameter, and as such a local variable. It will cease to exist when the function returns, and it will not transfer the value back. This is your problem. You'll have to return something or use a reference. –  Damon Oct 17 '11 at 22:36
2  
Why the downvote? It's a well worded question with a code sample to clarify the question. –  Mooing Duck Oct 17 '11 at 22:40
    
@dtustudy68: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… –  Mooing Duck Oct 17 '11 at 22:40

4 Answers 4

Will the heap allocation be returned from myAllo() ?

No. The argument myChar is being passed by value to myAllo(), so you're simply modifying a local copy of the pointer, not the value of the pointer in the caller's context.

memory pointed by myChar will be deallocated when myAllo returns.

No again. The function leaks the allocated memory when it exits. To de-allocate memory you need to call delete[] on the pointer returned by new[] but this pointer goes out of scope when the function exits.


There are several ways to fix your problem.

Have the caller pass in the address of the pointer which will point to the allocated memory, now you can modify what the caller's pointer points to.

void myAllo(int mySize, char **myChar )
{
    *myChar = new char[mySize];
}

Similarly, your function could accept a mutable reference to the pointer

void myAllo(int mySize, char *& myChar )
{
    myChar = new char[mySize];
}

Return a pointer to the allocated memory

char *myAllo( int mySize )
{
    return new char[mySize];
}

Better than all of the above solutions, instead of returning raw pointers, return a smart pointer

std::unique_ptr<char[]> myAllo( int mySize )
{
    return std::unique_ptr<char[]>( new char[mySize] );
}
share|improve this answer
    
std::unique_ptr<char[]> I don't know if that compiles, but if it does, it leads to undefined behavior, as it will be allocated with new[], and deallocated with delete (no []). Use std::vector<char> instead –  Mooing Duck Oct 17 '11 at 22:49
3  
@MooingDuck No, std::unique_ptr has a partial specialization for unique_ptr<Type[]> which calls delete[] in the destructor. –  Praetorian Oct 17 '11 at 22:50
1  
@MooingDuck: Actually, no, unique_ptr is wise to arrays, although I agree, vector<char> would be better. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 17 '11 at 22:51
    
I keep forgetting unique_ptr != auto_ptr. I didn't know about the Type[] overload. –  Mooing Duck Oct 17 '11 at 22:54
    
@MooingDuck: Specialization, not overload. –  Puppy Oct 18 '11 at 9:29

Will the heap allocation be returned from myAllo() ?

No.

memory pointed by myChar will be deallocated when myAllo returns.

No, this is a memory leak.

share|improve this answer
    
It is only a memory leak if there is no matching delete[] in the rest of his code. –  Robᵩ Oct 17 '11 at 22:36
1  
@Rob: How could there be a matching delete[]? The pointer is local, it's value is lost. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 17 '11 at 22:37
    
You are right. I saw something that wasn't there. –  Robᵩ Oct 17 '11 at 23:08

In order to get the memory you allocated you need to write the function as

void myAllo(int mySize, char **myChar )
{
    *myChar = new char[mySize];
}

and call it

char* pointer;
myAllo(size, &pointer);

or as

char* myAllo(int mySize )
{
    return new char[mySize];
}

and call it

char* pointer = myAllo(size);
share|improve this answer
void myAllo(int mySize, char *myChar ) 
{   //note: myChar is a COPY of someone else's pointer 
    myChar = new char[mySize];
    //nobody outside of the function will ever see this change
}

Dynamic memory (new) is only released when you explicitly release it.
myChar goes out of scope and is automatically cleaned up, but a pointer's "clean up" does not deallocate any memory it points at. This allows me to have multiple pointers point at the same data.

void myAllo(int mySize, char *&myChar )
{  //note: myChar is a REFERENCE of someone else's pointer 
    myChar = new char[mySize];
}

Or better yet, use a vector:

std::vector<char> myAllo(int mySize)
{
    return std::vector<char>(mySize);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer your comments on the flagrant missteps in myAllo(..). –  Captain Giraffe Oct 17 '11 at 23:07

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