Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The function cannot initialize an array because sizeof() returns bytes of an int pointer not the size the memory pointed by myArray.

 void assignArray(int *myArray)
 {
     for(int k = 0; k < sizeof(myArray); ++k)
     {
         myArray[k] = k;
     }
 }

Are there other problems ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
Are you expecting anything else? –  André Caron Oct 17 '11 at 22:58
1  
"Other than that, how was the play Mrs. Lincoln?" –  Jerry Coffin Oct 17 '11 at 23:01
    
It's probably best if you fix that big problem first and after that wonder if that new fixed version has other problems. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 17 '11 at 23:01
    
are any of these comments useful to the OP in any way? He's stated a problem, relatively well (I understood what he meant), he obviously doesn;t know as much as you guys, but you think its ok to make fun?!? Real cool guys.. –  StevieG Oct 17 '11 at 23:35
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't see other problems. However, you probably wanted this:

template<int sz>
void assignArray(int (&myArray)[sz])
{
    for(int k = 0; k < sz; ++k)
    {
        myArray[k] = k;
    }
}

Unless, of course, even the compiler doens't know how big it is at compile time. In which case you have to pass a size explicitly.

void assignArray(int* myArray, size_t sz)
{
    for(int k = 0; k < sz; ++k)
    {
        myArray[k] = k;
    }
}

If you don't know the size, you have a design error.

http://codepad.org/Sj2D6uWz

share|improve this answer
    
But this isn't going to work if the OP is allocating the array –  Praetorian Oct 17 '11 at 23:03
    
Darn -- beat me by 30 seconds! –  Jerry Coffin Oct 17 '11 at 23:03
    
@Praetorian: I assumed from the above code he does. I posted the second half of the answer. –  Mooing Duck Oct 17 '11 at 23:06
add comment

There are two types of arrays you should be able to distinguish. One looks like this:

type name[count];

This array is of type type[count] which is a different type for each count. Although it is convertable to type *, it is different. One difference is that sizeof(name) gives you count*sizeof(type)

The other type of array looks like this:

type *name;

Which is basically just a pointer that you could initialize with an array for example with malloc or new. The type of this variable is type * and as you can see, there are no count informations in the type. Therefore, sizeof(name) gives you the size of a pointer in your computer, for example 4 or 8 bytes.

Why are these two sizeofs different, you ask? Because sizeof is evaluated at compile time. Consider the following code:

int n;
cin >> n;
type *name = new type[n];

Now, when you say sizeof(name), the compiler can't know the possible future value of n. Therefore, it can't compute sizeof(name) as the real size of the array. Besides, the name pointer might not even point to an array!

What should you do, you ask? Simple. Keep the size of the array in a variable and drag it around where ever you take the array. So in your case it would be like this:

void assignArray(int *myArray, int size)
{
    for(int k = 0; k < size; ++k)
    {
        myArray[k] = k;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Well no, there are no other problems. The problem you stated is the only thing stopping you from initialising the array.

Typically, this is solved by simply passing the size along with the pointer:

void assignArray(int* myArray, std::size_t mySize)
{
    for (std::size_t k = 0; k < mySize; ++k)
        myArray[k] = k;
}

Note that I've used std::size_t for the size because that is the standard type for storing sizes (it will be 8 bytes of 64-bit machines, whereas int usually isn't).

In some cases, if the size is known statically, then you can use a template:

template <std::size_t Size>
void assignArray(int (&myArray)[Size])
{
    for (std::size_t k = 0; k < Size; ++k)
        myArray[k] = k;
}

However, this only works with arrays, not pointers to allocated arrays.

int array1[1000];
int* array2 = new int[1000];
assignArray(array1); // works
assignArray(array2); // error
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for a useful, unsarcastic, unpretentious answer... –  StevieG Oct 17 '11 at 23:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.