Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to sort a vector that contains an int and a string in each element. It is a vector of class type called vector recipes. Getting the above error, here's my code:

In my Recipe.h file

struct Recipe {
public:
    string get_cname() const
    {
        return chef_name;
    }
private:
    int recipe_id;
    string chef_name;

In my Menu.cpp file

void Menu::show() const {
    sort(recipes.begin(), recipes.end(), Sort_by_cname());
}

In my Menu.h file

#include <vector>
#include "Recipe.h"
using namespace std;

struct Sort_by_cname 
{
    bool operator()(const Recipe& a, const Recipe& b)
    {
        return a.get_cname() < b.get_cname();
    }
};

class Menu {
public: 
    void show() const;
private
    vector<Recipe> recipes;
};

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
Show us the line on which you get that error... –  Michael Goldshteyn Oct 17 '11 at 23:09
    
Are you sure you want to sort on the string value and not the recipe id? –  Michael Dorgan Oct 17 '11 at 23:11
    
I added a c++ tag; it should get this question more attention. –  Keith Thompson Oct 17 '11 at 23:11
    
Have you considered using a set instead of a vector? That way it's sorted by default, and you don't have to make it mutable. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 17 '11 at 23:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Menu::show is declared const, so inside of it Menu::recipes is considered to have been declared as vector<Recipe> const.

Obviously, sorting a vector<> changes it, so Menu::show must not be const (or Menu::recipes must be mutable).

share|improve this answer
    
That actually makes sense and explains the assignment compiler error. –  Michael Dorgan Oct 17 '11 at 23:18

You have marked your show method as const which isn't true because it is changing the recipes vector. When I compile the code you have outlined with gnu gcc 4.2.1 the error is specific to disqualifying the const qualifier, not the error you've posted.

You could mark your vector with the keyword mutable but I suspect that isn't what you really want? By marking the vector mutable it ignores the constness the compiler would normally enforce within Menu::show() const of the vector and it gets changed everytime Menu::show() is called. If you really want to use the vector, and not an ordered set like others have suggested, you could add a dirty state flag to let your program know when it should resort, or not.

The following code I have compiles by changing the vector to mutable to show you the difference, but I still recommend that you don't use sort from with a const show method.

#include <vector>
#include <string>

using namespace std;
struct Recipe {
public:
  string get_cname() const
  {
    return chef_name;
  }
private:
  int recipe_id;
  string chef_name;
};

class Menu {
public:
  void show() const;
private:
  mutable vector<Recipe> recipes;
};

struct Sort_by_cname
{
  bool operator()(const Recipe& a, const Recipe& b)
  {
    return a.get_cname() < b.get_cname();
  }
};

void Menu::show() const {
  sort(recipes.begin(), recipes.end(), Sort_by_cname());
}
share|improve this answer
    
The comparator should take arguments by const& (and its operator() should itself be const); the problem is that his vector<Recipe> is const. –  ildjarn Oct 17 '11 at 23:27
    
vector<Recipe> is not marked const, it only has const semantics because the method show() is marked const. That is why I suggested the use of the mutable keyword to qualify the vector type. –  James Oct 18 '11 at 3:54
    
I understand that, I only meant that the net effect is the same. –  ildjarn Oct 18 '11 at 4:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.