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Basically I've uploaded a text file to my host and I want to edit the file and read it with java. I've created the permissions for it but im not sure how to do it with Java. This is my code which read/writes locally:

Read:

BufferedReader mainChat = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("./messages/messages.txt"));
String str;
    while ((str = mainChat.readLine()) != null) 
    {
        System.out.println(decrypt.Decrypt(str, salt));
    }
    mainChat.close();

Write:

    FileWriter chatBuffer = new FileWriter("./messages/messages.txt",true);
    BufferedWriter mainChat = new BufferedWriter(chatBuffer);
    mainChat.write(message);
    mainChat.newLine();
    mainChat.flush();
    mainChat.close();

How would I have to modify this to make it work? Thanks

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1  
you would need to write some server process that reads the data, and not from the client. –  MeBigFatGuy Oct 18 '11 at 0:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't think you can read/write directly to a file on a web server the way you would on a local filesystem. What you'll probably need to do is:

  1. download the file
  2. open it in the local editor
  3. when it's saved, automatically re-upload the file

You can do this all within the editor, and hide this in the app by having it do the download-edit-save-upload in the background. Many text editors will do this by establishing a remote connection similarly, and making the file writing round trip transparent to user.

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I know that EditPlus does this. –  bdares Oct 18 '11 at 0:09
    
yah i dont think that will work, there are multiple users that are supposed to read and write to the same file, its a chat system kinda thing. so i was thinking whenever someone submits a new message it gets added to the txt and so on –  Cody Oct 18 '11 at 0:11
    
Oh, so someone else's changes my overrite yours. Well, in that case you need an extra layer; a go-between piece of software that accepts, timestamps, and reconciles/merges all the changes people make into one official version. Simply setting up the permissions and such won't do it on it's own, because the last person to write to the file will have their changes made, canceling out any others that were working on the file at the same time. –  jefflunt Oct 18 '11 at 0:15
    
but that's the thing, the current method it takes it a fraction of a second to submit the line, but if i were to download, edit, then reupload it, that will take too long and chances are a lot of messages will be lost. –  Cody Oct 18 '11 at 0:19
    
You need a database. –  SLaks Oct 18 '11 at 0:24

You should implement some sort of remote procedure call. Basically, from the client send the server a message containing what you'd like to put in the file. Then have the server actually open the file and write the content of the message to the file.

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