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I have multiple "tables" in a file, such as:

col1, col2, col3, col4
1, 2, 3, 4
5, 6, 7, 8

col2, col3, col5
10, 11, 12
13, 14, 15

And I would like to collapse these 2 tables to:

col1, col2, col3, col4, col5
1   , 2   , 3   , 4   , 
5   , 6   , 7   , 8   , 
    , 10  , 11  ,     , 12
    , 13  , 14  ,     , 15

(Note: extra whitespace left just to make things easier to understand)

This would seem to require at least 2 passes, one to collect the full list of columns, and another one to create the output table. Is it possible to do this with awk? If not, what other tool would you recommend?

share|improve this question
    
one solution would be to create file2 with the empty columns already in place, then the problem is much simpler ELSE do you want this to be dynamic and have logic that reads the header 'col1, ol2 ...' finding cols in common? Good luck –  shellter Oct 18 '11 at 3:48
1  
The join (1) command does almost what you want. You might try writing an awk script to read the file, identify the groups of columns, write them out to two separate files, and construct the join command line. –  Max Oct 18 '11 at 11:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code assumes that the tables are separated by empty lines:

awk -F', *' 'END {
  for (i = 0; ++i <= c;)
    printf "%s", (cols[i] (i < c ? OFS : RS))
  for (i = 0; ++i <= n;)
    for (j = 0; ++j <= c;)
      printf "%s", (vals[i, cols[j]] (j < c ? OFS : RS))    
  }
!NF { 
  fnr = NR + 1; next 
  }
NR == 1 || NR == fnr  {
 for (i = 0; ++i <= NF;) {
   _[$i]++ || cols[++c] = $i
   idx[i] = $i
   }
  next 
  }
{  
  ++n; for (i = 0; ++i <= NF;)
         vals[n, idx[i]] = $i
   }' OFS=', ' tables

If you have the tables in separate files:

awk -F', *' 'END {
  for (i = 0; ++i <= c;)
    printf "%s", (cols[i] (i < c ? OFS : RS))
  for (i = 0; ++i <= n;)
    for (j = 0; ++j <= c;)
      printf "%s", (vals[i, cols[j]] (j < c ? OFS : RS))    
  }
FNR == 1 {
 for (i = 0; ++i <= NF;) {
   _[$i]++ || cols[++c] = $i
   idx[i] = $i
   }
  next 
  }
{  
  ++n; for (i = 0; ++i <= NF;)
         vals[n, idx[i]] = $i
   }' OFS=', ' file1 file2 [.. filen] 
share|improve this answer

give this a try:

Code:

$ cat s.awk
NR==FNR{
    if (match($1, /^col/))
        maxIndex=(substr($NF,4,1)>maxIndex)?substr($NF,4,1):maxColumn
    next
}

FNR==1{
    for (i=1;i<=maxIndex;i++)
        header=(i==maxIndex)?header "col"i:header "col" i ", "
    print header
}

/^col[1-9]/{
    for (i in places)
        delete places[i]
    for (i=1;i<=NF;i++){
        n=substr($i,4,1)
        places[n]=i
    }
}

/^[0-9]/{
    s=""
    for (i=1;i<=maxIndex;i++)
        s=(i in places)? s $places[i] " " : s ", "
    print s
}

Call with:

awk -f s.awk file file  | column -t

Output:

col1,  col2,  col3,  col4,  col5
1,     2,     3,     4      ,
5,     6,     7,     8      ,
,      10,    11,    ,      12
,      13,    14,    ,      15

HTH Chris

share|improve this answer
    
This would work beautifully, if only my column headers were so nicely named. I shouldn't have named them the way I did, as that made it seems that there was a pattern to their names. Any ideas as to what to do if the column names are pretty much random? –  Daniel Oct 18 '11 at 12:51
    
Please give us concrete examples of what you have and what you want. Pretty much random is as concrete as pretty much everything. –  Chris Oct 18 '11 at 12:54
    
Or you could preprocess your data. In the first step create a map from your column names to "colX"-style names. Then use awk/sed to rename the column names and finally run my script. –  Chris Oct 18 '11 at 12:57
    
Better sample columns for table 1: "name, address, age, favorite-color", and for table 2: "name, address, height". I.e. the column names don't have a pattern. –  Daniel Oct 19 '11 at 2:54

Here's a one-pass perl solution. It assumes there is at least one blank line between each table in the file.

perl -00 -ne '
    BEGIN {
        %column2idx = ();
        @idx2column = ();
        $lineno = 0;
        @lines = ();
    }

    chomp;
    @rows = split /\n/;

    @field_map = ();
    @F = split /, /, $rows[0];
    for ($i=0; $i < @F; $i++) {
        if (not exists $column2idx{$F[$i]}) {
            $idx = @idx2column;
            $column2idx{$F[$i]} = $idx;
            $idx2column[$idx] = $F[$i];
        }
        $field_map[$i] = $column2idx{$F[$i]};
    }

    for ($i=1; $i < @rows; $i++) {
        @{$lines[$lineno]} = ();
        @F = split /, /, $rows[$i];
        for ($j=0; $j < @F; $j++) {
            $lines[$lineno][$field_map[$j]] = $F[$j];
        }
        $lineno++;
    }

    END {
        $ncols = @idx2column;
        print join(", ", @idx2column), "\n";

        foreach $row (@lines) {
            @row = ();
            for ($i=0; $i < $ncols; $i++) {
                push @row, $row->[$i];
            }
            print join(", ", @row), "\n";
        }
    }
' tables | column -t

output

col1,  col2,  col3,  col4,  col5
1,     2,     3,     4,
5,     6,     7,     8,
,      10,    11,    ,      12
,      13,    14,    ,      15
share|improve this answer
1  
This will not work for files which start with "col2, col3, col5" followed by "col1,col2,col3,col4". (the reverse of the example) –  Chris Oct 18 '11 at 13:47
1  
I was assuming that the column headers can be any arbitrary names, such as "first, last, phone, addr, ..." and not necessarily numbered. –  glenn jackman Oct 18 '11 at 14:25
    
BTW, it does work, the columns in the output are: "col2, col3, col5, col1, col4" –  glenn jackman Oct 18 '11 at 14:27

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