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I have a table inside of my mysql database which I constantly need to alter and insert rows into but it continues running slow when I make changes making it difficult because there are over 200k+ entries. I tested another table which has very few rows and it moves quickly, so it's not the server or database itself but that particular table which has a tough time. I need all of the table's rows and cannot find a solution to get around the load issues.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `articles`;
/*!40101 SET @saved_cs_client     = @@character_set_client */;
/*!40101 SET character_set_client = utf8 */;
CREATE TABLE `articles` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `content` text NOT NULL,
  `author` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `alias` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `topic` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `subtopics` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `keywords` text NOT NULL,
  `submitdate` timestamp NOT NULL default CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  `date` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `day` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `month` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `year` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `time` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `ampm` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `ip` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `score_up` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
  `score_down` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
  `total_score` int(11) NOT NULL default '0',
  `approved` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `visible` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `searchable` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `addedby` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `keyword_added` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `topic_added` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
  KEY `score_up` (`score_up`),
  KEY `score_down` (`score_down`),
  FULLTEXT KEY `SEARCH` (`content `),
  FULLTEXT KEY `asearch` (`author`),
  FULLTEXT KEY `topic` (`topic`),
  FULLTEXT KEY `keywords` (`content `,`keywords`,`topic`,`author`),
  FULLTEXT KEY `content ` (`content `,`keywords`),
  FULLTEXT KEY `new` (`keywords`),
  FULLTEXT KEY `author` (`author`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=290823 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
/*!40101 SET character_set_client = @saved_cs_client */;
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2  
Post the table's structure via its CREATE TABLE statement. Perhaps indexing some columns will help you –  Michael Berkowski Oct 18 '11 at 1:33
    
Will indexes help with mass writes? –  Nathan Loding Oct 18 '11 at 1:48
    
It's not a mass write, I can only insert 1 row at a time but it will run slow in comparison to other smaller tables. –  user761479 Oct 18 '11 at 1:51
1  
You've just got a bad table design. Keywords, for example, should be normalized out into a one-to-many table referencing the article ID. Also, varchar(255) is being abused all over the place. I see a lot of columns (approved, visible, searchable) that look like boolean data... you don't need 255 digits to handle that! –  Andrew Heath Oct 18 '11 at 3:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With indexes it depends:

more indexes = faster selecting, slower inserting

less indexes = slower selecting, faster inserting

Because the index tables has to be rebuild when inserting and the more data in the table is the more work is for mysql to do to rebuild the index.

So maybe you could remove indexes you not need, that should speed your inserting up.

share|improve this answer
    
great point thanks for that. –  user761479 Oct 18 '11 at 1:59
    
I also noticed a lot of "FULLTEXT KEY" being used. Those are slower than regular indexes. Dow you really need them? or can they be removed. –  iWantSimpleLife Oct 18 '11 at 2:49

Just try to pass the changes in an update script. This is slow because it creates tables. try updating the tables where changes has been made.

For example create a variable that catches all the changes in the program, with that, insert it to the tables query. That should be fast enough for programs. But as we all know speed depends on how much data is processed.

Let me know if you need anything else.

share|improve this answer
    
When you say create a variable what exactly are you referring too? –  user761479 Oct 18 '11 at 2:14
    
I'm referring to a stored procedure that gets all the variables that needs to be updated, then inserts it into the database tables. You have to create in your code something that calls the stored procedure and passes on the data that are modified. Then in your MySQL, catch those data and insert them into the tables. Hope I didn't get you confused. –  Nathan Oct 18 '11 at 2:41

Another option is to partition you table into many - this stops the bottle neck.

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"I have a table inside of my mysql database which I constantly need to alter and insert rows into but it continues"

Try innodb on this table if you application performs A LOT update, insert concurrently there, row level locking $$$

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This may or may not help you directly, but I notice that you have a lot of VARCHAR(255) columns in your table. Some of them seem like they might be totally unnecessary — do you really need all those date / day / month / year / time / ampm columns? — and many could be replaced by more compact datatypes:

  • Dates could be stored as a DATETIME (or TIMESTAMP).
  • IP addresses could be stored as INTEGERs, or as BINARY(16) for IPv6.
  • Instead of storing usernames in the article table, you should create a separate user table and reference it using INTEGER keys.
  • I don't know what the approved, visible and searchable fields are, but I bet they don't need to be VARCHAR(255)s.

I'd also second Adrian Cornish's suggestion to split your table. In particular, you really want to keep frequently changing and frequently accessed metadata, such as up/down vote scores, separate from rarely changing and infrequently accessed bulk data like article content. See for example http://20bits.com/articles/10-tips-for-optimizing-mysql-queries-that-dont-suck/

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I recommend you to split that "big table"(not that big actually, but for MySQL it may be) in several tables to make the most of the query cache. Any time you update some record in that table, the query cache is erased. Also you can try to reduce the isolation level, but that is a little more complicated.

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