Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We are doing custom drawing in a control subclass's OnRender. This drawing code is based on an external trigger and data. As such, whenever the trigger fires, we need to re-render the control based on that data. What we're trying to do is find out how to force the control to re-render but without going through an entire layout pass.

As stated above, most answers I've seen revolve around invalidating the Visual which invalidates the layout which forces new measure and arrange passes which is very expensive, especially for very complex visual trees as ours is. But again, the layout does not change, nor does the VisualTree. The only thing that does is the external data which gets rendered differently. As such, this is strictly a pure rendering issue.

Again, we're just looking for a simple way to tell the control that it needs to re-execute OnRender. I have seen one 'hack' in which you create a new DependencyProperty and register it with 'AffectsRender' which you just set to some value when you want to refresh the control, but I'm more interested in what's going on inside the default implementation for those properties: what they call to affect that behavior.


Update:

Well, it looks like there isn't any such call as even the AffectsRender flag still causes an Arrange pass internally (as per CodeNaked's answer below) but I've posted a second answer that shows the built-in behaviors as well as a work-around to suppress your layout pass code from running with a simple nullable size as a flag. See below.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, you must call InvalidateVisual, which calls InvalidateArrange internally. The OnRender method is called as part of the arrange phase, so you need to tell WPF to rearrange the control (which InvalidateArrange does) and that it needs to redraw (which InvalidateVisual does).

The FrameworkPropertyMetadata.AffectsRender option simply tells WPF to call InvalidateVisual when the associated property changes.

If you have a control (let's call this MainControl) that overrides OnRender and contains several descendant controls, then calling InvalidateVisual may require the descendant controls to be rearranged, or even remeasured. But I believe WPF has optimizations inplace to prevent descendant controls from being rearranged if their available space is unchanged.

You may be able to get around this by moving your rendering logic to a separate control (say NestedControl), which would be a visual child of MainControl. The MainControl could add this as a visual child automatically or as part of it's ControlTemplate, but it would need to be the lowest child in the z-order. You could then expose a InvalidateNestedControl type method on MainControl that would call InvalidateVisual on the NestedControl.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure that's 100% correct. Take a look at the very first sentence in MSDN regarding the AffectsRender flag... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Specifically it says "...affects the general layout in some way that does not specifically influence arrangement or measurement, but would require a redraw.' So the mechanism is there without an arrange. Doing the faux-DP mentioned above would be better than resorting to changing the visual tree. (I'm going to see if digging through Reflector will uncover anything.) –  MarqueIV Oct 18 '11 at 6:26
    
@MarqueIV - Actually, I used Reflector when looking into this. I almost never rely on the documentation. You can see OnRender is called from Arrange, and that FrameworkElement.OnPropertyChanged ultimately checks for the AffectsRender flag and calls InvalidateVisual if set. –  CodeNaked Oct 18 '11 at 6:32
    
Touche' to the documentation comment. I've been burned by that on way more than one occasion and I should have known better! :) That said, time for a test app! I'll create a DP with the AffectsRender bit set and subclass MeasureOverride and ArrangeOverride and see if they get called when I change it. If you're right and it does, then my next step will be to set a state flag and cache the last-called return values from the overloads, set the flag and call InvalidateVisual. In the overrides, if the flag is set, I simply return the cached values. If not, I let them do their thing. –  MarqueIV Oct 18 '11 at 6:39
    
@MarqueIV - They may not be called, but using AffectsRender would be the same as calling InvalidateVisual. There's alot of code in there to try to prevent arranging/measuring needlessly. –  CodeNaked Oct 18 '11 at 6:50
    
I'm starting to wonder if I should start a WPF blog instead of littering SO with such lengthy and verbose answers as I did below. ...or do you think things like that help here? (I'm asking because you're at 14K and I'm at a lowly 1K, so you have more SO experience than me. Thoughts?) –  MarqueIV Oct 18 '11 at 22:16
show 3 more comments

Ok, I'm answering this to show people why CodeNaked's answer is correct, but with an asterisk if you will, and also to provide a work-around. But in good SO-citizenship, I'm still marking his as answered since his answer led me here.

Here's what I did. To test this, I created this subclass...

public class TestPanel : DockPanel
{
    protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size constraint)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("MeasureOverride called for " + this.Name + ".");
        return base.MeasureOverride(constraint);
    }

    protected override System.Windows.Size ArrangeOverride(System.Windows.Size arrangeSize)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("ArrangeOverride called for " + this.Name + ".");
        return base.ArrangeOverride(arrangeSize);
    }

    protected override void OnRender(System.Windows.Media.DrawingContext dc)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("OnRender called for " + this.Name + ".");
        base.OnRender(dc);
    }

}

...which I laid out like this (note that they are nested):

<l:TestPanel x:Name="MainTestPanel" Background="Yellow">

    <Button Content="Test" Click="Button_Click" DockPanel.Dock="Top" HorizontalAlignment="Left" />

    <l:TestPanel x:Name="InnerPanel" Background="Red" Margin="16" />

</l:TestPanel>

When I resized the window, I got this...

MeasureOverride called for MainTestPanel.
MeasureOverride called for InnerPanel.
ArrangeOverride called for MainTestPanel.
ArrangeOverride called for InnerPanel.
OnRender called for InnerPanel.
OnRender called for MainTestPanel.

but when I called InvalidateVisual on 'MainTestPanel' (in the button's 'Click' event), I got this instead...

ArrangeOverride called for MainTestPanel.
OnRender called for MainTestPanel.

Note how none of the measuring overrides were called, and only the ArrangeOverride for the outer control was called.

It's not perfect as if you have a very heavy calculation inside ArrangeOverride in your subclass (which unfortunately we do) that still gets (re)executed, but at least the children don't fall to the same fate.

However, if you know none of the child controls have a property with the AffectsParentArrange bit set (again, which we do), you can go one better and use a Nullable Size as a flag to suppress the ArrangeOverride logic from re-entry except when needed, like so...

public class TestPanel : DockPanel
{
    Size? arrangeResult;

    protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size constraint)
    {
        arrangeResult = null;
        System.Console.WriteLine("MeasureOverride called for " + this.Name + ".");
        return base.MeasureOverride(constraint);
    }

    protected override System.Windows.Size ArrangeOverride(System.Windows.Size arrangeSize)
    {
        if(!arrangeResult.HasValue)
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("ArrangeOverride called for " + this.Name + ".");
            // Do your arrange work here
            arrangeResult = base.ArrangeOverride(arrangeSize);
        }

        return arrangeResult.Value;
    }

    protected override void OnRender(System.Windows.Media.DrawingContext dc)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("OnRender called for " + this.Name + ".");
        base.OnRender(dc);
    }

}

Now unless something specifically needs to re-execute the arrange logic (as a call to MeasureOverride does) you only get OnRender, and if you want to explicitly force the Arrange logic, simply null out the size, call InvalidateVisual and Bob's your uncle! :)

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is another hack: http://geekswithblogs.net/NewThingsILearned/archive/2008/08/25/refresh--update-wpf-controls.aspx

In short, you call invoke some dummy delegate at priority DispatcherPriority.Render, which will cause anything with that priority or above to be invoked too, causing a rerender.

share|improve this answer
    
Just looked at that, but I'm not sure that does what he thinks. I just called 'MainTestPanel.Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Render, EmptyDelegate)' but my OnRender was not called. Thoughts? (This looked very promising, but the lack of a response kinda vetoed my enthusiasm. Also, to be sure the delegate was called, I actually added a Console.WriteLine in it which did output so I know that's not the issue.) –  MarqueIV Oct 18 '11 at 8:24
    
Yes, having reread it I think you are right. It just forces the delegate that is already queued. Sorry! –  GazTheDestroyer Oct 18 '11 at 8:31
    
Just looked at it again. This won't work. The reason this isn't actually forcing a render. It's forcing things that are queued with the render priority to execute, but it doesn't force the control onto the render queue if that makes sense. Put another way, this says 'Hey... you can render right now, no waiting needed!' but the control is saying 'Thanks, but I don't have to!' In his example however, it does need to render since he set the content of the label which does mark the control to be rendered. Cool trick, but solves a different issue. –  MarqueIV Oct 18 '11 at 8:34
    
Ya beat me to it! :) I'm still voting you up because several people coming here for an answer may be very well looking for that solution, and it is kinda cool. –  MarqueIV Oct 18 '11 at 8:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.