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I have some questions about initializing a static collection. Here is an example I coded that seems to work:

#include <stack>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
    private:
    	static stack<int> numbers;

    	static stack<int> initializeNumbers();

    public:
    	A();
};

A::A() { cout << numbers.top() << endl; }

stack<int> A::initializeNumbers()
{
    stack<int> numbers;

    numbers.push(42);

    return numbers;
}

stack<int> A::numbers = initializeNumbers();

int main()
{
    A a;
}

Now, is this the best way to do what I'm trying to accomplish? For some reason, when I try this exact same scheme in my real code, calling top() prints gibberish. Could there be any reason for this?

If my example is fine, perhaps I will resort to posting my real code.


Here is the real code:

Light.h

#ifndef LIGHT_H_
#define LIGHT_H_

#include <stack>

#include "Vector4.h"

class Light
{
    private:
    	static stack<GLenum> availableLights;

    	static stack<GLenum> initializeAvailableLights();

    public:
    	GLenum lightID;
    	Vector4 ambient, diffuse, specular, position, spotDirection;
    	GLfloat constantAttenuation, linearAttenuation, quadraticAttenuation, spotExponent, spotCutoff;

    	Light(	const Vector4& ambient = Vector4(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0),
    			const Vector4& diffuse = Vector4(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0),
    			const Vector4& specular = Vector4(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0),
    			const Vector4& position = Vector4(0.0, 0.0, 1.0, 0.0),
    			const Vector4& spotDirection = Vector4(0.0, 0.0, -1.0, 0.0),
    			GLfloat constantAttenuation = 1.0,
    			GLfloat linearAttenuation = 0.0,
    			GLfloat quadraticAttenuation = 0.0,
    			GLfloat spotExponent = 0.0,
    			GLfloat spotCutoff = 180.0);

    	~Light();
};

#endif /*LIGHT_H_*/

Light.cpp

#include <stdexcept>    // runtime_error
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

#include "Light.h"

Light::Light(   const Vector4& ambient,
    			const Vector4& diffuse,
    			const Vector4& specular,
    			const Vector4& position,
    			const Vector4& spotDirection,
    			GLfloat constantAttenuation,
    			GLfloat linearAttenuation,
    			GLfloat quadraticAttenuation,
    			GLfloat spotExponent,
    			GLfloat spotCutoff) :

    			ambient(ambient),
    			diffuse(diffuse),
    			specular(specular),
    			position(position),
    			spotDirection(spotDirection),
    			constantAttenuation(constantAttenuation),
    			linearAttenuation(linearAttenuation),
    			quadraticAttenuation(quadraticAttenuation),
    			spotExponent(spotExponent),
    			spotCutoff(spotCutoff)
{
    // This prints gibberish.
    cout << availableLights.size() << endl;

    // The error is indeed thrown.
    if(availableLights.empty())
    	throw runtime_error("The are no more available light identifiers.");
    else
    {
    	lightID = availableLights.top();

    	availableLights.pop();
    }
}

Light::~Light() { availableLights.push(this -> lightID); }

stack<GLenum> Light::initializeAvailableLights()
{
    stack<GLenum> availableLights;

    availableLights.push(GL_LIGHT7);
    availableLights.push(GL_LIGHT6);
    availableLights.push(GL_LIGHT5);
    availableLights.push(GL_LIGHT4);
    availableLights.push(GL_LIGHT3);
    availableLights.push(GL_LIGHT2);
    availableLights.push(GL_LIGHT1);
    availableLights.push(GL_LIGHT0);

    return availableLights;
}

stack<GLenum> Light::availableLights = initializeAvailableLights();


And since I can't get the code with the stack to work, I've opted for this at the moment:

Light.h

#ifndef LIGHT_H_
#define LIGHT_H_

#include <stack>

#include "Vector4.h"

class Light
{
    private:
    	static const unsigned int LIGHTS = 9;
    	static bool availableLights[];
    	static GLenum lights[];

    	static GLenum getAvailableLight();

    public:
    	GLenum lightID;
    	Vector4 ambient, diffuse, specular, position, spotDirection;
    	GLfloat constantAttenuation, linearAttenuation, quadraticAttenuation, spotExponent, spotCutoff;

    	Light(	const Vector4& ambient = Vector4(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0),
    			const Vector4& diffuse = Vector4(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0),
    			const Vector4& specular = Vector4(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0),
    			const Vector4& position = Vector4(0.0, 0.0, 1.0, 0.0),
    			const Vector4& spotDirection = Vector4(0.0, 0.0, -1.0, 0.0),
    			GLfloat constantAttenuation = 1.0,
    			GLfloat linearAttenuation = 0.0,
    			GLfloat quadraticAttenuation = 0.0,
    			GLfloat spotExponent = 0.0,
    			GLfloat spotCutoff = 180.0);

    	~Light();
};

#endif /*LIGHT_H_*/

Light.cpp

#include <stdexcept>    // runtime_error

#include "Light.h"

Light::Light(   const Vector4& ambient,
    			const Vector4& diffuse,
    			const Vector4& specular,
    			const Vector4& position,
    			const Vector4& spotDirection,
    			GLfloat constantAttenuation,
    			GLfloat linearAttenuation,
    			GLfloat quadraticAttenuation,
    			GLfloat spotExponent,
    			GLfloat spotCutoff) :

    			ambient(ambient),
    			diffuse(diffuse),
    			specular(specular),
    			position(position),
    			spotDirection(spotDirection),
    			constantAttenuation(constantAttenuation),
    			linearAttenuation(linearAttenuation),
    			quadraticAttenuation(quadraticAttenuation),
    			spotExponent(spotExponent),
    			spotCutoff(spotCutoff)
{
    lightID = getAvailableLight();
}

Light::~Light()
{
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < LIGHTS; i++)
    	if(lights[i] == lightID)
    		availableLights[i] = true;
}

bool Light::availableLights[] = {true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true};
GLenum Light::lights[] = {GL_LIGHT0, GL_LIGHT1, GL_LIGHT2, GL_LIGHT3, GL_LIGHT4, GL_LIGHT5, GL_LIGHT6, GL_LIGHT7};

GLenum Light::getAvailableLight()
{
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < LIGHTS; i++)
    	if(availableLights[i])
    	{
    		availableLights[i] = false;

    		return lights[i];
    	}

    throw runtime_error("The are no more available light identifiers.");
}


Can anyone spot an error in the code with the stack, or perhaps improve upon my hastily coded workaround?

share|improve this question
    
Why not redesign this thing? Create a LightManager that manages the lights. This code breaks the single Responsibility principle, in that lights are no longer just lights, but also do the managing of themselves. By having a manager lights can be lights and light managers can manage. – GManNickG Apr 23 '09 at 4:06
    
Good point! However, even if I move the static data into another class, I'm still stuck with this weird initialization problem. – Scott Apr 23 '09 at 4:09
    
Well if you move it into a LightManager, it doesn't really need to be static since your LightManager will be the static (common) entry point to managing lights. That said it would be good to understand this problem. :) Just letting you know another approach. – GManNickG Apr 23 '09 at 4:47

I don't think that code will even compile (missing A:: from initializeNumbers() for a start).

I suggest you post your real code.

However, why do you not just initialize the stack on the first constructor call (with thread protection if you're running in a multithreaded environment of course).

That seems to be a much cleaner way of doing it, something like (untested):

#include <stack>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class A {
    private:
        static boolean isInited = false;
        static stack<int> numbers;
    public:
        A();
};

A::A() {
    if (!isInited) {
        numbers.push(42);
        isInited = true;
    }
    cout << numbers.top() << endl; }

int main() {
    A a;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That shouldn't be a problem though because it's being returned by value. The copy of the stack (while inneficient if much larger) should be fine. – JaredPar Apr 23 '09 at 3:35
    
But I'm passing the local stack by value and assigning it immediately to my static stack, so should the copy constructor get called for my static stack? – Scott Apr 23 '09 at 3:36
    
Because then I have to make that ugly isInited check. :-) I posted the real code. Save me! – Scott Apr 23 '09 at 4:03
    
Ugly maybe, though debatable and definitely functional. My advice is to go with this. Are you trying to be clever or are you trying to deliver software? If the former, by all means ignore my advice. Re "Save me" - I've already saved you. If you decide to jump into the pit again, that's your problem, not mine :-) – paxdiablo Apr 23 '09 at 4:34
    
Is it just me or does the original example work? – GManNickG Apr 23 '09 at 4:53

There can definitely be a reason for this. There are really two issues with this approach in general. The first problem is that static initializers run before the main method starts in C++. This means that initializeNumbers will run before anything else in the program. In this limited sample that's not much of a problem.

The second issue though is that C++ does not provide any guarantee to ordering. Meaning if you have more than one statically initialized variable, the compiler is free to initialize them in whatever order it pleases. So if you have a dependency on one static variable in anothers initializer you will run into bugs (and creating a subtle dependency is very easy to do).

You're probably much better off here doing some form of delayed initialization for complex static values.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that I need to pop values off of this stack for instances of my class. I can't delay initialization! – Scott Apr 23 '09 at 3:38
    
@Scott, you can't pop until your object is created so create the entries in the constructor - see my answer. I still fear per-main initialization of complex objects for the reasons given by @Jared - I'll always prefer to do them in the constructor. – paxdiablo Apr 23 '09 at 3:44

Wondering if something along these lines would help you. I still prefer Pax's suggestion, it's simpler, but this should avoid your "is init" worries.

class NumStack : public stack<int>
{
public:
   NumStack(){
      push(42);
   }
};

class A
{
    private:
        static NumStack numbers;

    public:
        A();
};

//in cpp file, do as usual for static members
NumStack A::Numbers;

If the inheritence makes you quesy (which it should, it aint pretty), just aggregate stack into NumStack. This will require some changes to the usage of numbers in the code though:

class NumStack
{
public:
   NumStack(){
      obj.push(42);
   }
   stack<int> obj;
};
share|improve this answer
    
STL containers are not designed for inheritance; this should be done with caution or (my preference) not at all. – Patrick Johnmeyer Apr 23 '09 at 4:54
    
Yea for sure, I edited to show aggregation as an alternative, but I figured inheritence would be ok in this case since usage is quite limited due to NumStack having no members. – Snazzer Apr 23 '09 at 12:16

Here is one way of doing it:

#include <stack>

class C {
    static std::stack< C* > c_stack;
    static std::stack< C* > getCStack();
};

std::stack< C* > C::c_stack = C::getCStack();

std::stack< C* > C::getCStack() {
    std::stack< C* >* c_stack = new std::stack< C* >();
    c_stack->push( new C());
    return *c_stack;
}
share|improve this answer

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