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I'm just curious about the use of this, because the sample code and documentation of Android don't make use of the this keyword (I like to believe that the android engineers are generally smart, thus my using them as a basis). I'm just curious about the underlying reason that the android engineers don't make use of this much.

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Could you give an example where you can't live without this? – Gleno Oct 18 '11 at 3:20
    
using this is a good practice not sure about android though. Might have something to with key value coding. – Shahzeb Oct 18 '11 at 3:22
    
I guess I can live without it, but personally, I find it easier to use this. It's more explicit for me, thus making it clearer. – cesar Oct 18 '11 at 3:23
    
@Gleno in inner classes you kind of need to use 'this' when accessing the private stuff in the outer class(s). – Zammbi Oct 18 '11 at 3:23
1  
It is a bad practice NOT to use this. everywhere you can. Explicit is always better than implicit. It is a natural scoping mechanism in code block of methods as well, never wonder where that variable came from. super. is also something one should always use. – Jarrod Roberson Oct 18 '11 at 3:31
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Its mainly a stylistic difference. I've yet to see a argument as to why its good or bad. Personally I like to use it and there are a few instances when you need to use it.

For example if you have a Anonymous Inner class that wants to call a method of the parent class you need this. Example:

class MyClass{
    protected void doSomething(){

    }

    OnClickListener n = new OnClickListener(){
        public void onClick(View v){
            MyClass.this.doSomething();
        }
    };

}

Another reason to use this is if a method argument masks a member variable. In that case you can use this to distinguish between the two, although I'd recommend you rename the argument to something that is non masking.

class MyClass{
    protected int val;

    public void setVal(int val){
        this.val = val; // set the member variable equal to the method argument
    }

}

Another reason to use this is when passing a pointer to the current class instance from within that instance. An example of this is when you create a new Intent

Intent i = new Intent(this, NewActivity.class);

There are probably more places where you'll need to use this. These are the first few that came to mind.

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Using this is only necessary if you want to access some part of the current instance that is hidden by something else in the local scope. It's not needed in your inner class because OnClickListener does not have a doSomething() hiding MyClass#doSomething(). – jackrabbit Oct 18 '11 at 6:50

It doesn't matter, but if you use 'this' in your code, make sure you use it everywhere. That makes your code clear.

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What makes you think that is the case? E.g. SDK coding style guide does not mention that and I have seen this being used in various places. However with following the naming guidelines for variables it is often not necessary and can be omitted, which is often the case.

When referring to an instance using the this keyword is good for clarity though, but as the doc mentions there is no really enforced style and following the naming rules makes it not necessary.

e.g. a totally valid setter following the naming with and without this could be

 private int mCounter;
   public void setCounter(int counter) {
      mCounter = counter
   }

 private int increment;
 public void setIncrement(int increment) {
     this.increment = increment
 }

Note that in the first example you could, but dont have to use this. In the second you have to and the first it probably closer to the style guide..

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I just assumed they didn't like this because most of the sample code and documentation that I saw doesn't make use of it. It made the documentation a bit harder to read for me, cause they'd mention a method say, startService (), and I wouldn't know the class that contains startService (). – cesar Oct 18 '11 at 3:29
    
for method invocations it is different. If there is no qualifier in place it is automatically this.something() and that is very rarely used in Java in general. I would not use it. – Manfred Moser Oct 18 '11 at 3:30
    
"I just assumed ..." - the consensus is that you assumed wrong. – Stephen C Oct 18 '11 at 4:30

It's more personal taste than bad practice.

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No it's not, there are references to 'this' in the sample code for android but there's no reason to ever think of it as a bad practice. A lot of the time it's unnecessary however and it may have been omitted for brevity.

For example a call to methodA() from within the class it's defined could be called as this.methodA(). It's unecessary in this case as this is implied when you make the call. It's commonly used in setters where the argument name is the same as the variable name you are setting.

public void setName(String name) {
   this.name = name;
}
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Using this is more of a safety measure:

class MyClass{
    void doSomething() { 
    }

    OnClickListener n = new OnClickListener() {
        void doSomething() {
        }

        public void onClick(View v){
            MyClass.this.doSomething(); // MyClass#doSomething()
            this.doSomething(); // OnClickListener#doSomething()

            doSomething(); // OnClickListener#doSomething() if present,
                           // MyClass#doSomething() otherwise - danger!
        }
    }; 
}

Since there are cases where you cannot control the presence of a member or a method (e.g. when the OnClickListener is a third-party class), to get a predictable behaviour, you should allways qualify such a reference. Unless the variable behaviour is exactly what you want.

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