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    ArrayList<Object> list = new ArrayList<Object>();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        Object o = new Object();
        list.add(o);
    }
    list = null;

or

    ArrayList<Object> list = new ArrayList<Object>();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        Object o = new Object();
        list.add(o);
        o = null;
    }

which code block will cause memory leak in java, why?

If neither will cause memory leak, how can I cause a memory leak~ (I want some code)

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7  
Neither, what on earth makes you think either one would? Is this a homework question? –  Chris Oct 18 '11 at 3:29
    
you do realize though that every thing that loop has done in first has gone down the gutter right after exit when you set you list to null :) –  Shahzeb Oct 18 '11 at 3:31
    
Why did you change String to Object? All you've done is changed a working program (with no storage leaks) into a program with compilation errors! –  Stephen C Oct 18 '11 at 4:23

3 Answers 3

I do not think that any memory leak is happening in the code given above. Even though you are setting s to null "string" object is still referred by the ArrayList items. So those string objects still have active references after the loop ends.

Memory leaks are still possible in Java through static object reference. Please refer the link.

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2  
The situation that link describes isn't a real memory leak, though. I suppose you could call it a memory leak if you want to, but it's distinctly different from a C-style memory leak because the object occupying the memory is still reachable and thus it can, in principle, be recovered at some point later in the program. –  David Z Oct 18 '11 at 3:49

Neither case will cause a memory leak and all the objects are released at the end of the code block automatically.

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Neither example has a memory leak. In Java it's not worth explicitly setting a variable to null just to help the garbage collector out a bit.

Note that there are situations where long-lived references to large objects (say in a cache) do need to be set to null to avoid unconstrained memory growth (leaks).

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