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For a project I'm working on, I have a bunch of "library classes". These are essentially collections of related functions of values. Some of these libraries need to be "initialized" at run-time. So far, I've been utilizing the design below as a solution:

// Filename: Foo.h
namespace my_project
{
namespace library
{
class Foo
{
public:
    static int some_value; // members used externally and internally

    Foo()
    {
        // Lots of stuff goes on in here
        // Therefore it's not a simply member initialization
        // But for this example, this should suffice
        some_value = 10;
        Foo::bar();
    }

    static void bar() { ++some_value; } // some library function

    // no destructor needed because we didn't allocate anything

private:
    // restrict copy/assignment
    Foo(const Foo&);
    void operator=(const Foo&);
};
int Foo::some_value = 0; // since some_value is static, we need this
} // library namespace
static library::Foo Foo;
} // my_project namespace

Using Foo would be similar to this, as an example:

#include "Foo.h"
using namespace my_project;
int main()
{
    int i = Foo.some_value;
    Foo.bar();
    int j = Foo.some_value;
    return 0;
}

Of course, this example is very simplified, but it gets the point across. This method has four advantages to me:

  1. User of the library doesn't need to worry about initialization. They wouldn't need to call something like Foo::init(); inside their main(), because library::Foo was initialized when my_project::Foo was constructed. This is the main design constraint here. User should not be responsible for initializing the library.

  2. I can create various private functions inside the library to control its use.

  3. The user can create other instances of this library if they choose, for whatever reason. But no copying would be allowed. One instance would be provided for them by default. This is a requirement.

  4. I can use the . syntax instead of ::. But that's a personal style thing.

Now, the question is, are there any disadvantages to this solution? I feel like I'm doing something that C++ wasn't meant to do because Visual Studio's IntelliSense keeps freaking out on me and thinks my_project::Foo isn't declared. Could it be because both the object and the class are called Foo even though they're in different namespaces?

The solution compiles fine. I'm just worried that once my project grows larger in scale, I might start having name ambiguities. Furthermore, am I wasting extra memory by creating an object of this library?

Should I simply stick to the singleton design pattern as an alternative solution? Are there any alternative solutions?

UPDATE:

After reviewing the solutions provided, and jumping around google for various solutions, I stumbled upon extern. I have to say I'm a bit fuzzy on what this keyword really does; I've been fuzzy about it ever since I learned C++. But after tweaking my code, I changed it to this:

// Foo.h
namespace my_project
{
namespace library
{
class Foo_lib
{
public:
    int some_value;
    Foo_lib() { /* initialize library */ }
    void bar() { /* do stuff */ }
private:
    // restrict copy/assignment
    Foo_lib(const Foo_lib&);
    void operator=(const Foo_lib&);
};
} // library namespace
extern library::Foo_lib Foo;
} // my_project namespace

// Foo.cpp
#include "Foo.h"
namespace my_project
{
namespace library
{
    // Foo_lib definitions
} // library namespace
library::Foo_lib Foo;
} // my_project namespace

// main.cpp
#include "Foo.h"
using namespace my_project;
int main()
{
    int i = Foo.some_value;
    Foo.bar();
    int j = Foo.some_value;
    return 0;
}

This seems to have the exact same effect as before. But as I said, since I'm still fuzzy on extern usage, would this also have the exact same bad side-effects?

share|improve this question
    
No, you don't need a singleton here. Why would you? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 18 '11 at 4:11
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: Because the library needs to be initialized to a certain state before being used. And the user should not be responsible for initializing it. –  Zeenobit Oct 18 '11 at 4:21
1  
@teedayf: and what happens if they themselves want to use it during static initialization ? –  Matthieu M. Oct 18 '11 at 6:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This line is particularly bad:

static library::Foo Foo;

It emits a static copy of Foo in every translation. Don't use it :) The result of Foo::some_value would be equal to the number of translations the Foo.h was visible to, and it's not thread safe (which will frustrate your users).

This line will result in multiple definitions when linking:

int Foo::some_value = 0;

Singletons are also bad. Searching here @SO will produce a lot of reasons to avoid them.

Just create normal objects, and document to your users why they should share objects when using your library, and in which scenarios.

User of the library doesn't need to worry about initialization. They wouldn't need to call something like Foo::init(); inside their main(), because library::Foo was initialized when my_project::Foo was constructed. This is the main design constraint here. User should not be responsible for initializing the library.

Objects should be able to construct themselves as needed without introducing unstrippable binary baggage.

I can create various private functions inside the library to control its use.

That's not unique to your approach.

The user can create other instances of this library if they choose, for whatever reason. But no copying would be allowed. One instance would be provided for them by default. This is a requirement.

Then you can force your users to pass Foo as a necessary argument to create the types they depend upon (where Foo is needed).

I can use the . syntax instead of ::. But that's a personal style thing.

Not good. Not threadsafe, and the user can then seriously mess up your library's state. Private data is best.

share|improve this answer
    
If I were to do that, I think it'd be simpler to just implement Foo::init() and make the user call it. Or have a single init() function that initializes all these libraries. Those would be less messy, I think. Still, I'd rather meet the requirement. I completely see why that line is bad now though. –  Zeenobit Oct 18 '11 at 4:28
    
@teedayf Foo::init can just move to (or be called in) Foo's constructor. If you document "Hey, this font manager (Foo) takes a long time to construct and requires a lot of memory", your users ought to listen. They may also have perfectly valid reasons to create multiple font managers. Static initialization is a pain, and it can be very difficult to remove this dependency after the fact. Exposing the fact that getting the font requires a font manager (which is a heavy object) is really not a bad thing. –  justin Oct 18 '11 at 4:40
    
I stumbled upon yet another solution while googling. I updated the original question. Would be much appreciated if you gave me your thoughts on it. :) –  Zeenobit Oct 18 '11 at 18:10
    
@teedayf the update addresses only two issues, and there are still numerous important issues remaining. extern in a namespace is similar to static in a class (in that there can be only one definition). the updated version still has serious issues -- things many experienced devs will go to lengths avoid (or not introduce). Matthieu M. also made important points, which the update does not resolve: you still should not use a singleton, you should use private data, you should allow your users to initialize and destruct properly (read: when they choose), and your library should be thread safe. –  justin Oct 18 '11 at 21:19
    
I see what you mean. Looking over at Matthieu M's solution again, I think it's the closest thing I can get while remaining "safe". That's basically what I wanted to know: What differences would static have with extern. Thanks a lot for all the help. –  Zeenobit Oct 18 '11 at 21:32

There are two things going on here:

  • What if the user would dearly like to parallelize her code ?
  • What if the user would like to start using your library during the static initialization phase ?

So, one at a time.

1. What if the user would dearly like to parallelize her code ?

In the age of multi-core processors libraries should strive for re-entrancy. Global State is bad, and unsynchronized Global State is even worse.

I would simply recommend for you to make Foo contain regular attributes instead of static ones, it is then up to the user to decide how many instances in parallel should be used, and perhaps settle on one.

If passing a Foo to all your methods would prove awkward, have a look at the Facade pattern. The idea here would be to create a Facade class that is initialized with a Foo and provides entry points to your library.

2. What if the user would like to start using your library during the static initialization phase ?

The static initialization order fiasco is just horrid, and the static destruction order fiasco (its sibling) is no better, and even harder to track down (because the memory is not 0-initialized there, so it's hard to see what's going on).

Since once again it's hard (impossible ?) for you to predict the usage of your library and since any attempt to use it during static initialization or destruction is nigh impossible with a singleton that you would create, the simpler thing to do is to delegate at least initialization to the user.

If the user is unlikely to be willing to use this library at start-up and shut-down, then you may provide a simple safeguard to automatically initialize the library on first use if she didn't already.

This can be accomplished easily, and in a thread-safe manner (*), using local static variables:

class Foo {
public:
  static Foo& Init() { static Foo foo; return foo; }

  static int GetValue() { return Init()._value; }

private:
  Foo(): _value(1) {}
  Foo(Foo const&) = delete;
  Foo& operator=(Foo const&) = delete;

  int _value;
}; // class Foo

Note that all this glue is completely useless if you simply decide not to use a Singleton and go for the first solution: a regular object, with per-instance state only.

(*) Thread safety is guaranteed in C++11. In C++03 (the version used primarily in the industry) the best compilers guarantee it as well, check the documentation if required.

share|improve this answer
    
I followed the first part of your post and declared the members regularly without static. However, I also merged with another solution using the extern keyword. I'm still not sure if the solution eliminates the side effects, so I updated the question. –  Zeenobit Oct 18 '11 at 18:12
    
@teedayf: you still have the issue of initialization/destruction order (you will have it as long as you keep a global object). –  Matthieu M. Oct 19 '11 at 6:08

Now, the question is, are there any disadvantages to this solution?

Yes. See for instance, this entry in the c++ faq on the static initialization order fiasco. http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.14 tldr? Essentially, you have no control over what order static objects (such as Foo above) get initialized in, any assumptions about the order (eg. initializing one static object with values from another) will result in Undefined Behaviour.

Consider this code in my app.

#include "my_project/library/Foo.h"

static int whoKnowsWhatValueThisWillHave = Foo::some_value;

int main()
{
   return whoKnowsWhatValueThisWillHave;
}

There are no guarantees on what I am returning from main() here.

The user can create other instances of this library if they choose, for whatever reason. But no copying would be allowed. One instance would be provided for them by default. This is a requirement.

Not really, no... Since all of your data is static, any new instances are essentially empty shells pointing to the same data. Basically, you have a copy.

I feel like I'm doing something that C++ wasn't meant to do because Visual Studio's IntelliSense keeps freaking out on me and thinks my_project::Foo isn't declared. Could it be because both the object and the class are called Foo even though they're in different namespaces?

You are! Suppose I add this line to my code:

using namespace ::my_project::library;

what does 'Foo' resolve to now? Maybe this is defined in the standard, but at the very least, it is confusing.

I can use the . syntax instead of ::. But that's a personal style thing.

Don't fight the language. If you want to code in Python or Java syntax, use Python or Java (or Ruby or whatever)...

Should I simply stick to the singleton design pattern as an alternative solution? Are there any alternative solutions?

Yes, the Singleton is a good one, but you should also consider whether you actually need a singleton here. Since your example is only syntactic, it is hard to say, but maybe it would be better to use dependency injection or something similar to minimize/eliminate tight couplings between classes.

Hopefully I haven't hurt your feelings :) It's good to ask questions, but obviously you already know that!

share|improve this answer
    
I actually like your response. You brought up a few points I overlooked. The major thing that I tried to highlight in my example is that the library needs to be initialized to a certain state before being used, and the user should not worry about initializing it manually. Therefore I need a constructor. That's why I think singleton would be useful. Would that be correct? –  Zeenobit Oct 18 '11 at 4:19
    
The important thing to keep in mind about the singleton pattern is that you are making an object that is meant to be instantiated only once. If that constraint is not important, I think dependency injection is at least worth considering. Passing a set of routines around may seem strange, but it adds mucho flexibility. DI is often useful when you want to do test driven development for instance. That said, using lazy initialization with the singleton pattern could be a good way to go, and would require very few structural changes. Eg. Foo.SomeMethod() becomes Foo::Instance().SomeMethod(); –  Yourpalal Oct 18 '11 at 4:43

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