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I've spent a couple days at this and I give up.

I'm trying to get an object to animate along a sine wave infinitely. It should not end after the first period.

Main Problem: The cycle ends at approx 1 1/3 Pi rather than just Pi. This extra movement ruins the animation.

I'm stuck here: http://jsfiddle.net/WPnQG/12/. After each period, it skips about 40 pixels and then continues along its path. This is the problem I can't get past -- the value it ends at and proceeds to restart at are not equal, so the object appears to skip around. Could anyone help a man out? Thanks

I am using the jQuery Path Plugin to perform the path of the animation -- the sine wave in question.

enter image description here


Source:

function float(dir){
    var x_current = $("div").offset().left;
    var y_current = $("div").offset().top;
    var SineWave = function() {
        this.css = function(p) {
            var s = Math.sin(Math.abs(p-1)*10);
            if (!dir){// flip the sin wave to continue traversing
               s = -s;
            }
            var x =  300 -p * 300;
            var y = s * 100 + 150;
            //var o = ((s+2)/4+0.1); //opacity change
            last_x = x;
            // add the current x-position to continue the path, rather than restarting
            return {top: y + "px", left: x_current + x + "px"};
        } 
    };

    $("div").stop().animate({
        path: new SineWave
    }, 5000, 'linear', function(){
        // avoid exceeding stack
        setTimeout(function(){float(!dir)}, 0);
    });

}
share|improve this question
    
May I ask why you call float(true,false) even though float(dir) only takes one argument? Just trying to learn about JS –  Ankit Soni Oct 18 '11 at 4:56
    
I was testing some things and forgot to take that false out since i removed the argument, won't do anything except probably throw an error in IE –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 4:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When I comment out this line:

setTimeout(function(){float(!dir)}, 0);

the element stops motion precisely on the line marked It skips here.

It appears that when you reset the motion to // avoid exceeding stack it resets the position of the element to to y=0, while preserving the x value of the element as well as its path of motion.

This hypothesis is further validated in that when ever a skip occurs (anywhere on the y axis) the element always resumes its motion from y=0. Sometimes its y value is > y = 0 while sometimes it is < y = 0 -- thus the random looking "skipping around."

Edit

Going back to the source sine demo, it seems you can get near infinite scrolling, by manipulating the x= ... line. After some looking at the original source, it appears that the demo script was only written to accommodate that one specific example and fixed width problems.

Here is a working example.

By manipulating the numbers on line 1 and 2 you can specify the number of pixels for the path to traverse, and the slow the path down on line 3 to make it the same speed as the original demo. So, not mathematically infinite, but it took a good 45 seconds to complete on my computer. By manipulating these specific lines you can make it as "infinite" as you need.

window.SineWave = SineWave = function() {
    this.css = function(p) {
        s = Math.sin((p-1)*500);  // 1
        x = (5000 - p*5000) * 10; // 2
        y = s * 100 + 150;
        return {top: y + "px", left: x + "px"};
    } 
}

  $("#nyan").stop().animate(
        {path: new SineWave}, 
        50000, // 3
        "linear"
  );
share|improve this answer
    
Right, I need it to pick up where it left off. Been trying numerous approaches but can't get through that hangup –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 4:14
    
@Atticus - your thoughts on faux-infinity (see edit)? –  Michael Jasper Oct 18 '11 at 6:06
    
Mike! Excellent man this is perfect. So yes, you are right mine only allowed to traverse through ONE period. What in your fix allows for the multiple periods? (By period, I'm referring trigonometrically to the cycle of one sine wave) Is it Line 1 or 2 that allows it to cycle more than once? Or both? I thought line 1 just changed the amplitude and line 2 changed the width of the period, clearly I was mistaken. +1 and you are the man, been dying over this one. –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 6:20

I must confess i was a bit confused about how this was written however i do understand you got it from the wiki. It just struck me as odd that the sin wave went beyond 2 pi before restarting. Typically a sin wave is from 0 to 2pi for a complete loop. I have some updated javascript taking this into account and the hiccup is now gone.

function float(dir){
var x_current = $("div").offset().left;
var y_current = $("div").offset().top;
var SineWave = function() {
    this.css = function(p) {
        var pi2 = (3.1415927 * 2);
        var a = p * pi2;
        var s = Math.sin((pi2 - a)*2);
        var x =  300 * (1 - p);
        var y = s * 100 + 150;
        //var o = ((s+2)/4+0.1); //opacity change
        last_x = x;
        // add the current x-position to continue the path, rather than restarting
        return {top: y + "px", left: x_current + x + "px"};
    }
};

$("div").stop().animate({
    path: new SineWave
}, 5000, 'linear', function(){
    // avoid exceeding stack
    setTimeout(function(){float(!dir)}, 0);
});

}

float(true);

Note: you can tell it how many sin waves to complete by changing the constant in s (1 is one full sin wave, 2 is two full sin waves, etc.) Also, there is no more need to "reverse" the wave.

JSFiddle link: http://jsfiddle.net/P5vqG/8/

share|improve this answer
    
Nice work gary. Yeah isn't that weird that it continues past its end point? I used Mike's solution but I will definitely keep this handy incase I change things around. Thanks for your input man, this did teach me a thing or two. Kudos +1 –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 6:53
    
yeah i was late to the party, thanks for the +1 –  Gary.S Oct 18 '11 at 6:54
    
:) I do appreciate the response though, I can now easily see why it was not previously working. Appreciated. –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 7:05

Why don't you use HTML5 Canvas? http://falcon80.com/HTMLCanvas/Animation/SineWave.html

share|improve this answer
    
Can't use it for project specific reasons –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 4:12

You can use PathAnimator to animate anything along any path. you only need the SVG coordinates that describe your path.

Demo Page

share|improve this answer

Change

 return {top: y + "px", left: current_x + x + "px"}; 

to

  return {top: y + "px", left: last_x + x + "px"};

See an updated fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
It does not continue to the next segment (needs to continuously move forwards) –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 4:13
    
All that did was double the distance of X over time, it still holds the same bug. –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 4:14
    
Your fiddle resets the x value after around 1 1/3 ish pi. Intended? –  Michael Jasper Oct 18 '11 at 4:16
    
Not intended at all. This is the bug I believe –  Atticus Oct 18 '11 at 4:58

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