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I am doing a sample application where I have declared a struct:

 // common.h
 typedef struct MyStruct
 {
   int a;
 }

  //sample.h
  #include "common.h"
  int main()
  {
     MyStruct st;// getting error here
  }

C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier

What are the possible reasons for this?

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Is MyStruct defined before creating an object of that type? –  Alok Save Oct 18 '11 at 4:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two things:

First, you're missing a semi-colon after the struct definition:

 // common.h
 typedef struct MyStruct
 {
     int a;
 };
  ^

Not that this is still wrong. You will need to fix the other error.

Second, you should define the struct like this:

 // common.h
 typedef struct
 {
     int a;
 } MyStruct;

Alternatively, you can define it like this:

 // common.h
 struct MyStruct
 {
     int a;
 };
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That first and second example are wrong-ish by the way. Not in the sense it will stop your code from compiling, just that the typedef is superfluous without an actual aliasing type. And your second contention is wrong (that you need to do it that way), you can create a struct xyzzy and then creates variables with it in C++ with just xyzzy varname, as you show in your third example. –  paxdiablo Oct 18 '11 at 4:39
    
I know, it was just to point out the missing semi-colon. I will edit to make that clear. –  Mysticial Oct 18 '11 at 4:40

Your "common.h" header does not define MyStruct properly; it needs a semi-colon on the end.

Then the typedef is vacuous; in C++, you don't need the typedef to get type MyStruct defined. (In C, you'd need to write:

typedef struct MyStruct { int a; } MyStruct;

But C++ does not require that - though it does not object to it, either.)

So, it would be sufficient to write:

struct MyStruct { int a; };
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It's almost always because the type MyStruct isn't defined at that point, either because you're including the wrong header or the type specification fails for some reason.

If that typedef is exactly what you have in your common.h, it won't work. It should be followed by the aliasing type and a semicolon. Or perhaps you didn't want a typedef since C++ allows you to refer to MyStruct as a "proper" type in the source code.

Something like this works fine:

struct MyStruct { int a; };
int main() {
    MyStruct st;
    return 0;
}

Or even this, showing the three possibilities:

struct MyStruct { int a; };
typedef struct MyStruct2 { int a; } xyzzy;
int main() {
    MyStruct st;
    MyStruct2 st2;
    xyzzy st3;
    return 0;
}
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