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Hello every one this is basically extension to my previous question. i have write the short int value in file using

short int x= 254;
FILE * f1 = fopen("infile" ,"w");
fwrite (&x , 1 , sizeof(short int ) , f1 );

it working fine but when i tried to retrieve value like this

short int y ;
fread(&y , 2, 1 ,f1);
printf("%d"  , y);

it gave me answer 8180 and next time 12276 so on... what should i do

actually I want to store short integers in my file and then retrieve them one by one am i doing it wrong kindly guide me

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to read back from the file you just wrote to, you need to open it with "w+" options to allow you to read and write. You then need to seek back to the beginning of the file:

// Open the file
const char* fname = "infile";
FILE * f1 = fopen("infile" ,"wb+");
if( f1 != NULL )
{
    printf("opened file '%s' for writing / reading\n", fname);

    // Write two bytes
    short int x = 254;
    size_t bytes_written = fwrite(&x, 1, sizeof(short int), f1 );
    printf("%hd bytes written\n"  , bytes_written);

    // Seek to the start of the file
    int seek_result = fseek(f1, 0, 0);
    if( seek_result == 0 )
    {
        printf("found beginning of file\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("failed to seek to beginning of file\n");
    }

    // Read the two bytes back in
    short int y = -9999;
    size_t bytes_read = fread(&y, 1, sizeof(short int), f1);
    printf("%hd bytes read: %hd\n", bytes_read, y);

    // We're done with the file so close it
    fclose(f1);
}
else
{
    // Something went wrong and we failed to open the file
    printf("failed to open file '%s' for writing / reading\n", fname);
}

Alternatively, you could read / write as separate operations:

// Open the file
const char* fname = "infile";
FILE * f1 = fopen("infile" ,"wb");
if( f1 != NULL )
{
    printf("opened file '%s' for writing\n", fname);

    // Write two bytes
    short int x = 254;
    size_t bytes_written = fwrite(&x, 1, sizeof(short int), f1 );
    printf("%hd bytes written\n"  , bytes_written);

    // We're done with the file so close it
    fclose(f1);
}
else
{
    // Something went wrong and we failed to open the file
    printf("failed to open file '%s' for writing\n", fname);
}

// re-open the file
FILE * f2 = fopen("infile" ,"rb");
if( f2 != NULL )
{
    printf("opened file '%s' for reading\n", fname);

    // Read the two bytes back in
    short int y = -9999;
    size_t bytes_read = fread(&y, 1, sizeof(short int), f2);
    printf("%hd bytes read: %hd\n", bytes_read, y);

    // We're done with the file so close it
    fclose(f2);
}
else
{
    // Something went wrong and we failed to open the file
    printf("failed to open file '%s' for reading\n", fname);
}

Note that in your original code you weren't checking the return value of fread to check whether you'd actually read anything from the file. If you'd done that you'd have seen it was returning 0 to indicate that it read 0 bytes. If you're not reading anything from the file and you're not initialising y then it's likely to just be a random number.

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thanks alot sir –  mainajaved Oct 18 '11 at 6:30
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Most likey you aren't closing and reopening the file between writing and reading. I would suggest creating a small function that does both actions, first writing, then closing and flushing, then reading. See what kind of results you get with that. Also, make sure you are using binary mode.

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ok sir thanks but sir its working with out binary mode :/ –  mainajaved Oct 18 '11 at 6:30
    
it did this time but jmoreno is correct; there will be occasions where reading / writing in text mode will fail if you are writing (and more importantly) reading binary data with a text reader. –  Jon Cage Oct 18 '11 at 6:34
1  
@mainajaved: I should have said 'you may need to use binary mode', and despite your initial success, you still may need to do so (depending upon what you are writing). Anyway, glad it's working for you now. –  jmoreno Oct 18 '11 at 6:34
    
ok sir got it thanks –  mainajaved Oct 18 '11 at 8:11
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I agree with Jon Cage answer (upvote him, not me!)

Also note that (a long time ago), Windows/DOS systems needed binary files to be opened with 'wb', 'rb' instead of 'w' and 'r'. I'm not sure it is still the case, but there's no problem trying.

Here's a bit of code to get things more clear:

short int x= 254;
int nwritten;
FILE * f1 = fopen("infile" ,"w+b");
nwritten=fwrite (&x , 1 , sizeof(short int ) , f1 ); /* check number of shorts written */
if (nwritten != 1) fprintf(stderr,"Error: %d short written\n",nwritten);

And for the reading part:

short int y ;
int nread;
nread=fread(&y , sizeof(short int), 1 ,f1); /* check number of shorts read */
if (nread == 1) printf("%d"  , y);
else fprintf(stderr,"Error: could not read 1 short int (%d read)\n",nread);

Also, remember that the position inside the file is incremented after each read/write. You might want to get back to the start of the file before reading. Do this either by closing/reopening the file as in Jon answer or by seeking to the start using:

fseek(f1,0L,SEEK_SET); /* you also can use rewind(f1); for the same result */

Full code:

short int x= 254;
int nwritten;
FILE * f1 = fopen("infile" ,"w+b");
nwritten=fwrite (&x , 1 , sizeof(short int ) , f1 ); /* check number of shorts written */
if (nwritten != 1) fprintf(stderr,"Error: %d short written\n",nwritten);

short int y ;
int nread;
fseek(f1,0L,SEEK_SET); /* get back to the start */
nread=fread(&y , sizeof(short int), 1 ,f1); /* check number of shorts read */
if (nread == 1) printf("%d"  , y);
else fprintf(stderr,"Error: could not read 1 short int (%d read)\n",nread);
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got it thanks alot sir –  mainajaved Oct 18 '11 at 7:01
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