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I have one charater pointer array which points to the some stirngs

every element points to some strings one thing in mind strings have only 1 and 0 .

for example

i have character pointer that stores string like "100110" so its takes 6 bytes to store but i want to store this in bits so i reduce memory occpuied.

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3  
C or C++ ? They are two different languages. –  Paul R Oct 18 '11 at 6:51
    
The << operator should help you. –  Simon Oct 18 '11 at 6:51
    
Have a look into here :<stackoverflow.com/questions/688314/…; –  UPT Oct 18 '11 at 6:51
    
in C .. and but << help ..i am fresher in C and i have some assignment work –  Sam_k Oct 18 '11 at 6:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C style, something like this should work:

char* str = "100101";
unsigned out = 0;

for (int i = 0; str[i]; i++) {
   out = (out << 1);
   if (str[i] == '1')
      out++;
}

(I cannot test this for now, so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Explanation:

str = "100101"
out = 0000 0000 0000 0000

i = 0:
   out = 0000 0000 0000 0000 (out << 1)
   out = 0000 0000 0000 0001 (out++ because str[0] == '1')

i = 1:
   out = 0000 0000 0000 0010 (out << 1)

[...]

i = 5:
   out = 0000 0000 0010 0100 (out << 1)
   out = 0000 0000 0010 0101 (out++ because str[5] == '1')
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i will test. here unsigned out is char?? –  Sam_k Oct 18 '11 at 7:02
    
may be its works dude i will check ...thanx –  Sam_k Oct 18 '11 at 7:03
    
unsigned is for unsigned int, use the type you want, depending of your string length –  Simon Oct 18 '11 at 7:04
    
can i use unsigned char out = 0; –  Sam_k Oct 18 '11 at 7:06
    
My string length is maximum 15 or 16... –  Sam_k Oct 18 '11 at 7:07

Have you tried the STL bitset container? It's optimized for exactly this purpose. Alternatively, creating a vector of bool elements will internally pack bits to save space.

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tell me more description about dis?? –  Sam_k Oct 18 '11 at 7:05

Why not use 'strtol'? It's a standard lib function. Or you're writing low-level code for memory shortage hardware?

char *str = "010101";
int i = strtol(str ,(char**)NULL ,2);

==> i=21
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One way is to, define that char* [] as a global and use its indices for accessing it:

char stringLiterals [] =  { "0101010", "10010010", "111", "010100100", ... };

Usage: Instead of

char *p = stringLiteral[3];

use

unsigned int idx = 3;

Rationale: If you are compacting this string into bits for serialization purpose than it's ok. But otherwise I don't see any use case of compacting them. In my above solution, it doesn't use any extra memory. You already have an array of string literals; I am just asking to declare in global scope and use its index.

Also, if the string size is > 32 bytes then, you won't be able to store it in a single 32-bit int.

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i dnt want to access i want to store "0101010" string in bits. instead of bytes –  Sam_k Oct 18 '11 at 7:01
    
u get my question? –  Sam_k Oct 18 '11 at 7:04
    
@SaurabhPatel, yes I indeed get your question. My answer suggest you the final usability within your code. You store "010101" somewhere and then for using it you again covert it back to "010101". Instead of that, you can simply store that string literal into an array and just get its index. It's equivalent to converting "010101" into a single int. If you are not dealing with serializing your data then this technique is helpful. I assume that you want to covert the string literals and not the content of some variable, in the later case u have to use vector instead of array –  iammilind Oct 18 '11 at 7:09
    
@downvoter, please see my rational behind the answer in the comment above. If I am missing something, kindly explain. –  iammilind Oct 18 '11 at 7:12
    
@iammilind: "but i want to store this in bits so i reduce memory occpuied" (from its question). And I read you answer about 5 times to vaguely understand your point... –  Simon Oct 18 '11 at 7:19

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