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Whitin a "units" element can be many "unit" elements which again have a "units" element.

I want to write the unitName of each unit into a custom class with prop UnitName AND the unitName of the previous/parent unit into the prop ParentUnitName.

I am also unsure what type of data the recursive method should return... best would be a List with a flat list.

How would you do that?

<units>
  <unit>
    <unitName>Test05</unitName>    
    <units>
      <unit>
        <unitName>Test03</unitName>        
        <units>
          <unit>
            <unitName>Test04</unitName>           
            <units>
              <unit>
                <unitName>Test07</unitName>                
                <units>
                  <unit>
                    <unitName>Test01</unitName>                    
                  </unit>
                </units>
              </unit>
            </units>
          </unit>
        </units>
      </unit>
    </units>
  </unit>
</units>
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Are you using XmlDocument or XmlReader? What have you tried? Where did it fail? I would probably use a method like void ReadUnits(XmlNode node, String parentUnitName, List<CustomClass> list) that will call it self recusively. –  Casperah Oct 18 '11 at 7:05
    
XDocument /LINQ –  msfanboy Oct 18 '11 at 7:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have a look at the XDocument class.

It has a variety of methods available to help with parsing Xml easily. In your case it would look something like:

var xdoc = new XDocument(xmlString);
foreach(XElement node in xdoc.Descendants("unitName"))
{
  AddToList(node.value);
}

This will iterate through all unitName elements in the xml document and you can do whatever you want with them.

Edit: Changed xdoc.Descendants to xdoc.Elements, so it works recursively now and yields the expected results.

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that does not work recursively. –  msfanboy Oct 18 '11 at 7:13
    
... and it is slow, veeeeery slow. –  Fischermaen Oct 18 '11 at 7:18
    
@Fischermaen: It's not that much slower and until it's an identified bottleneck I wouldn't use XmlSerializer only for its speed. –  Darcara Oct 18 '11 at 7:46
    
it does not work recursively with elements because you do not check in the foreach further node.Elements("unitName") –  msfanboy Oct 18 '11 at 7:55
    
What I meant was, that the xdoc.Descendants will traverse the xml in it's entirety and return all 5 unitName nodes in the document in the right order (5,3,4,7,1). –  Darcara Oct 18 '11 at 9:00

I would prefer writing a class in this way:

[Serializable]
[XmlRoot("unit")]
public class Unit
{
    [XmlArray("units")]
    [XmlArrayItem("unit")]
    public Unit[] Units { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("unitName")]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

and then serialize / deserialize it with XmlSerializer.

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