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I am using OpenJPA and was wondering how to reference another custom entity. Let's assume there is a Person and an Address. Both are my modeled entities.

How would Person correctly refer to Address?

This way:

@Entity
public class Person {

    @Column
    @Inject
    Address adr;
}

or like this:

@Entity
public class Person {

    @Column
    Address adr = new Address();
}

The reason why I rather want to inject or instantiate is I see null pointer exception when I access Address like this: #{myBean.personA.adr.street} because adr returns null when the object is not loaded from an existing record, but used when creating a new one

How do you solve auch issues in your entities? Am I missing sth.? BTW: I use openJPA and Webbeans

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would create it at the point where you're explicitly creating a new Person.

@ManagedBean
@ViewScoped
public class Register {

    private Person person;

    @PostConstruct
    public void init() {
        person = new Person();
        person.setAddress(new Address());
    }

    // ...
}

Or, alternatively, do the job in Person so that you don't need to repeat it:

@ManagedBean
@ViewScoped
public class Register {

    private Person person;

    @PostConstruct
    public void init() {
        person = Person.create();
    }

    // ...
}

with

@Entity
public class Person {

    public static Person create() {
        Person person = new Person();
        person.setAddress(new Address());
        return person;
    }

    // ...
}
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good solution, that gives me 2 options doing such things. thank you –  jonnie119 Oct 18 '11 at 15:23
    
You're welcome. –  BalusC Oct 18 '11 at 15:24

You could try defining a constructor to initialize default values for your variables. This way any time your object is created it would run the constructor first before applying any values form the database. This works assuming your address object does not have a null value in the database. Generally though you want to use null checks before referencing an object traversal that deep since your data could potentially have null values if you aren't already validating data entry and/or the tables don't have not null constraints.

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I wouldn't recommend referencing your entities from JSF pages directly. You could save your forms data into some intermediary objects first, and then call some EJB service which would initialize entity from your temporary object and persist it.

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