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I need help with this. I have such query:

SELECT * FROM cart WHERE
(ts_in between 1249077600 AND 1318975199);

The above query is using btree index on ts_in colomn (range type). Now I want to add another criteria to this. For example:

SELECT * FROM cart WHERE
(ts_in between 1249077600 AND 1318975199) and is_removed=0;

The above query doesn't use the btree index on ts_in colomn (range).

Can somebody tell me why and how can I do it right way to reach very fast calculations.

I created two indexes for testing :

CREATE INDEX range_idx_1 using BTREE
ON cart (is_removed, ts_in);

and

CREATE INDEX range_idx_2 using BTREE
ON cart (ts_in , is_removed);

What is Funny that when I use this query:

EXPLAIN SELECT id FROM cart WHERE
(ts_in between 1249077600 AND 1318975199) AND is_removed=0;

I receive this results:

id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys           | key         | key_len | ref | rows  | Extra 
1  | SIMPLE      | cart  | range | range_idx_1,range_idx_2 | range_idx_1 | 6       |     | 17391 | Using where; Using index

The above query is using index but:

EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM cart WHERE
(ts_in between 1249077600 AND 1318975199) AND is_removed=0;

I have such results:

id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys           | key         | key_len | ref   | rows  | Extra 
1  | SIMPLE      | cart  | ref   | range_idx_1,range_idx_2 | range_idx_1 | 1       | const | 77979 | Using where

This doesn't use the index.

When I try to USE INDEX or FORCE INDEX syntax the results are the same. In one case Mysql doesn't use index. Any Help?

share|improve this question
    
Please post the explain plan for each query. –  Hammerite Oct 18 '11 at 7:44
    
Is it a MyISAM or an InnoDB table? Shall I guess that it is InnoDB ? –  ypercube Oct 18 '11 at 8:58
    
I added execution plan for each of the above scenario. It seems that the second query is not type range but why? –  Marcin Oct 18 '11 at 8:58
    
@ypercube It's a InnoDB table –  Marcin Oct 18 '11 at 8:59
    
That's why (because it's InnoDB) that is using the (is_removed, ts_in) index when you do SELECT id .... The Primary Key is stored inside every index in InnoDB so MySQL does not have to read the table, only to range scan the index, to find the ids. –  ypercube Oct 18 '11 at 9:01

1 Answer 1

run a

EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM cart WHERE
(ts_in between 1249077600 AND 1318975199) and is_removed=0;

to see why the mysql query optimizer chooses a different index.

Mysql is not very good at combining indexes itself, so you probably will need a combined index for this query. Try to add a index (btree?) for is_removed, ts_in (in this order!).

You can also force mysql to use your index by adding a USE INDEX to your query. Sometimes this gives better result as the index the query optimizer chose:

SELECT * FROM cart USE INDEX '<idx_name>' WHERE
(ts_in between 1249077600 AND 1318975199) and is_removed=0;
share|improve this answer
    
I fill the question with some more information. The USE INDEX or FORCE INDEX donesn't work. When I have in this query "select *" the mysql doesn't use index. When I have "select id" for example then mysql is using right index but I need the solution for "select *". –  Marcin Oct 18 '11 at 7:54
    
The 'id' is stored (I assume id is the primary key) in the index, so mysql doesn't need to access the table itself for generating the result set. But for select * it needs to, and the query optimizer comes to the conclusion using the index doesn't make any sense in this case. For '*' I think you will be out of luck doing it the simple way. Maybe some sort of cascading queries will work... –  HefferWolf Oct 18 '11 at 8:22

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