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I have a program that is used to replicate/mirror the main tables (around 20) from Oracle to MSSQL 2005 via webservice (REST).

The program periodically read XML data from the webservice and convert it to list via jpa entity. This list of entity will store to MSSQL via JPA. All jpa entity will be provided by the team who create the webservice.

There are two issues that I notice and seems unsolvable after some searching.

1st issue: The performance of inserting/updating via JDBC jpa is very slow, it takes around 0.1s per row... Doing the same via C# -> datatable -> bulkinsert to new table in DB -> call stored procedure to do mass insert / update base on joins takes 0.01 s for 4000 records. (Each table will have around 500-5000 records every 5 minutes)

Below shows a snapshot of the Java code that do the task-> persistent library -> EclipseLink JPA2.0

private void GetEntityA(OurClient client, EntityManager em, DBWriter dbWriter){        
//code to log time and others
  List<EntityA> response = client.findEntityA_XML();
  em.setFlushMode(FlushModeType.COMMIT);
  em.getTransaction().begin();
  int count = 0;
  for (EntityA object : response) {
    count++;
    em.merge(object);
    //Batch commit
    if (count % 1000 == 0){
      try{
        em.getTransaction().commit();
        em.getTransaction().begin();
        commitRecords = count;
      } catch (Exception e) {
        em.getTransaction().rollback();
      }
    }
  }
  try{
    em.getTransaction().commit();
  } catch (Exception e) {
    em.getTransaction().rollback();
  }
  //dbWriter write log to DB
}

Anything done wrong causing the slowness? How can I improve the insert/update speed?

2nd issue: There are around 20 tables to replicate and I have created the same number of methods similar to above, basically copying above method 20 times and replace EntityA with EntityB and so on, you get the idea...

Is there anyway to generalize the method such that I can throw in any entity?

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2  
Please learn how to write 'Java' (hint: it is neither 'JAVA' nor 'java'). –  Andrew Thompson Oct 18 '11 at 8:28
    
Thanks good point, a bit off topic but it is easy to ignore capital letter and making mistake confusing mb, MB, Mb when proof reading. Being non native English speaker relying on the spell check program, if there aren’t any red waves then I can only assume nothing goes wrong. –  codeIsFun Oct 20 '11 at 6:41
    
Oh and I did put Java in the topic to emphasize the 'poor relation' between MSSQL and Java hoping someone know something I don't. Because even not using ORM I hardly find enough doc on JDBC drivers (the sqljdbc or jTDS) that show JDBC can support bulk/batch insert. –  codeIsFun Oct 20 '11 at 7:58

2 Answers 2

The performance of inserting/updating via JDBC jpa is very slow,

OR mappers generally are slow for bulk inserts. Per definition. You ant speed? Use another approach.

In general an ORM will not cater fur the bulk insert / stored procedure approach and tus get slaughtered here. You use the wrong appraoch for high performance inserts.

There are around 20 tables to replicate and I have created the same number of methods similar to above, basically copying above method 20 times and replace EntityA with EntityB and so on, you get the idea...

Generics. Part of java for some time now.

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Although I prefer bulk insert or similar but given choice not made by me I can only try as much as I can to get the most out of ORM. It is not my intention to show a 'slaughtered' case, but if the difference is that large I might be doing something wrong, missing some config or whatsoever. –  codeIsFun Oct 20 '11 at 6:57
    
No. Point is you use the wront tool. "making the best ouf of a fiat panda" does not turn it into a formula 1 rascin g car. No chance. Bulk insert is faster. –  TomTom Oct 20 '11 at 9:06

You can execute SQL, stored procedure or JPQL update all queries through JPA as well. I'm not sure where these objects are coming from, but if you are just migrating one table to another in the same database, you can do the same thing you were doing in C# in Java with JPA.

If you want to process the objects in JPA, then see, http://java-persistence-performance.blogspot.com/2011/06/how-to-improve-jpa-performance-by-1825.html

For #2, change EntityA to Object, and you have a generic method.

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Thanks James. The objects are from webservice. Oracle tables -> Webservice (not control by me) -> my program -> MSSQL tables –  codeIsFun Oct 20 '11 at 7:01

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