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I am using linq to search through a list (user enters query in a textbox).

I want this to be case-insensitive and tried to use IgnoreCase, but I have no idea where to put it.... I know I could use upper or lower, but I would like to hear if anybody has any alternative methods? What would be considered best practise? Regex did not seem to work either?

        string searchQuery = tbSearchQuery.Text;
        var something= from x in y 
                       where x.Subject.Contains(searchQuery)
                       select x;
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3  
It actually kinda depends on what the y is here... i.e. is this LINQ-to-Objects? -SQL? -EF? Different implementation will support different things. –  Marc Gravell Oct 18 '11 at 8:44

8 Answers 8

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Use string.Compare:

    var something= from x in y 
                   where string.Compare(x.Subject, searchQuery, true) >= 0
                   select x;

This can also handle situations where either strings are null.

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3  
I don't know why this is accepted -- it is not the correct answer. This code returns all strings that are either equal to or have a higher sort order than the query. It returns "Bill" when the query is "Adam". This would only be useful if you were checking for == 0, which would return only equal strings, but a) Equals would be better for that; and b) the question is about returning strings that contain the query, not only those that exactly match. –  nmclean Sep 5 '13 at 19:37
    
String.Compare works for its intended purpose, which is determining relative sort order, but the question is about looking for matches from a search query. My comment was not a bogus claim: see the output for yourself (at the bottom). Those results are incorrect because the user did not search for anything resembling "Bill" or "Charlie". It also should have returned "1adam", but it doesn't. Dylan Smith's answer is correct because it passes the test successfully: see the correct output here. –  nmclean Sep 13 '13 at 13:02
    
It doesn't work. As nmclean said, it works if you use " == 0" but returns too many results when you use the " >= 0" –  Grax Mar 26 at 19:46
string searchQuery = tbSearchQuery.Text; 
var something= from x in y  
               where x.Subject.IndexOf(searchQuery, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) >= 0
               select x; 
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This does not work in EF4.4. –  Daniel Harvey May 2 '13 at 16:59
    
the original question was not about EF. Depending on your DB settings string compares are usually case in-sensitive by default, so you can use the original code in the question and it should work fine for EF. –  Dylan Smith May 2 '13 at 17:28
    
Right, was just letting others know since I saw an upvoted comment. –  Daniel Harvey May 3 '13 at 14:34

Since nobody else has put it up yet, I'd propose using the static String.Equals so you don't have to worry about null and get back only the information you want.

String.Compare also works but you're not trying to sort the strings (the reason for the integer return value), just determine whether they are value-equal under case-insensitive comparison.

var something = from x in y 
                where string.Equals(x.Subject, searchQuery, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
                select x;
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I use the following own made extensions (for plain strings)

 public static bool Contains(this string source, string toCheck, StringComparison comp)
 {
    return source.IndexOf(toCheck, comp) >= 0;
 }

 public static bool ContainsIgnoreCase(this string source, string toCheck)
 {
    return source.IndexOf(toCheck, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) >= 0;
 }

HTH

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Try

string searchQuery = tbSearchQuery.Text; 
var something= from x in y  
               where x.Subject.IndexOf(searchQuery, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) != -1
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This is cool assuming x.Subject is not null. –  Alex R. Oct 18 '11 at 8:55
    
Well, you can add a null check to the where clause. –  Henning Krause Oct 18 '11 at 10:34

If you are using LINQ-to-SQL or Entity Framework, the collation rules are fixed and set in the table definition. The only way to compare them is to ToUpper (or ToLower, but it's better to ToUpper as written here http://www.siao2.com/2007/10/01/5218976.aspx) both part of the comparison.

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Could you use IndexOf instead?

string searchQuery = tbSearchQuery.Text;
var something= from x in y 
               where x.Subject.IndexOf(searchQuery, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) >= 0
               select x;
share|improve this answer

I second the extension method way. I've got a class I use. Just plonk it in your project and reference YOUR NAME SPACE and away you go.

using System;

namespace YOUR NAME SPACE
{
    public static class StringExtensionMethods
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Extention method to allow a string comparison where you can supply the comparison type 
        /// (i.e. ignore case, etc).
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="value">The compare string.</param>
        /// <param name="comparisionType">The comparison type - enum, use OrdinalIgnoreCase to ignore case.</param>
        /// <returns>Returns true if the string is present within the original string.    </returns>
        public static bool Contains(this string original, string value, StringComparison comparisionType)
        {
            return original.IndexOf(value, comparisionType) >= 0;
        }
    }
}

And here's an example of a LINQ query using it:


var results = from promotion in response
              where
                  String.IsNullOrEmpty(find.Code) ||
                  (promotion.Code != null && promotion.Code.Contains(find.Code, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
              where
                  String.IsNullOrEmpty(find.Name) ||
                  (promotion.Name != null && promotion.Name.Contains(find.Name, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
              select promotion;

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