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Let's say I have a table with a Date column. In my C# application, I want to be able to query for rows using the LIKE operator on the DateTime column. My problem is, how do I handle the regional settings?

For example, if the current regional settings are set to de-DE, the date format of windows is dd.mm.yyyy. Now the user might enter something like %2009, resulting in the following query:

select * from MyTable where to_char(MyDateColumn, 'dd.MM.yyyy') like '%2009'

But with different regional settings, the input of the user will look different of course, so to_char doesn't work anymore.

How can I work around this? Oh, and I'm looking for a database-independent solution.

Many thanks in advance!

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5 Answers 5

You don't want to use a LIKE operator on a DATETIME column, believe me.

select * from MyTable where year(MyDateColumn) = 2009

or

select * from MyTable where datepart(yy, MyDateColumn) = 2009
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"I" don't want to use a LIKE operator on a DateTime column, but a customer is requesting this feature... The year and datepart functions only work on MS SQL Server, right? –  Christian Hubmann Apr 23 '09 at 6:26
    
The customer doesn't want to use the LIKE operator either, I'm quite sure. What exactly are they requesting? –  Tomalak Apr 23 '09 at 6:31
    
Well, if there's a DateTime box on a form, they want to be able to query with placeholders, like %2009 to get all rows for 2009, for example. –  Christian Hubmann Apr 23 '09 at 6:45
    
What should happen if they enter "%12009", or %1209%"? (Don't say that this can't happen.) –  Tomalak Apr 23 '09 at 6:47
    
It should happen what you would expect from LIKE ;) "%12009" -> date values with months ending with 1 in the year 2009. "%1209%" -> ah... i guess that would be 12th of september in any year. I think you get the point ;) –  Christian Hubmann Apr 23 '09 at 7:06
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Don't convert it into textual form!!!

Use DATEPART to check this: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa258265(SQL.80).aspx

eg:

select * from MyTable where DATEPART(year, MyDateColumn) = 2009
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But the datepart function does only work on MS SQL Server, right? I'm looking for a database-independent solution... –  Christian Hubmann Apr 23 '09 at 6:27
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And specially, do use parametrised queries to prevent SQL Injection attacks.

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Yes, I'm doing that. The select I wrote was just as an example. But you have a point ;) –  Christian Hubmann Apr 23 '09 at 6:29
    
Great. Believe me, making such comments is a good thing because a lot of people isn't aware of that problem. –  Miha Markic Apr 23 '09 at 11:28
    
Hm... I guess you're right ;) –  Christian Hubmann Apr 23 '09 at 13:00
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Display date in dd/mm/yy format:

SELECT [Sales_id]
      ,[sales_no]
      ,[sequence_id]
      ,[sales_Date], CONVERT(char(12), sales_Date, 3) as sales_Date1
      ,[Net_Total]
      ,[Roundoff]
     FROM [Furniture].[dbo].[SalesMaster]



288 109 1   2010-08-21 00:00:00.000 21/08/10        1040.00


291 110 1   2010-08-21 00:00:00.000 21/08/10        103.00


294 111 1   2010-08-21 00:00:00.000 21/08/10        7128.00 -0.40

Please refer to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa172602(SQL.80).aspx

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Don't compare dates with strings. Instead, use something like the DATEPART function to compare to just the year.

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But the datepart function does only work on MS SQL Server, right? I'm looking for a database-independent solution... –  Christian Hubmann Apr 23 '09 at 6:28
    
I don't know whether DATEPART is T-SQL only. Same with the YEAR function. –  John Saunders Apr 23 '09 at 6:35
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