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for example, I'm trying to initialize a new Person

var me = new Person();

but i'm just wondering if it's possible for that initialization to automatically return a seed?

I'm trying to add it to the constructor but I don't know how?

public class Person
{
   public Person Person(){ return ...}
}

well, that doesn't really work. Can anyone explain to me why it doesn't work and if there's another way to do this?

I can do object initialization, but I'm just wondering if this is possible??

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closed as not constructive by Jan Carlo Viray, Tim Post Apr 1 '12 at 5:54

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8  
What do you mean by "seed"? –  PVitt Oct 18 '11 at 9:31
1  
Change the name of your function to CreatePerson and make it static? That's called the Factory (method) pattern. Or just do something in your constructor. No, you can't make new do anything but call the constructor (and base class constructors) and its (their) guts. And the constructor won't return anything but the object you're constructing. And no, you can't make it virtual. You could use a separate (possibly abstract) factory class for that. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 18 '11 at 9:34
    
What's a seed, and what on earth are you trying to accomplish? The initialization of an object returns an object of that type, there's no need to make a constructor for that .. –  Andreas Carlbom Oct 18 '11 at 9:35
2  
@Jan sure, but it needs to know where to get the data from, assuming not all people are called Joe... –  Marc Gravell Oct 18 '11 at 9:37
1  
@MerlynMorgan-Graham: yeahh.. you're right actually. I forgot about that. –  Jan Carlo Viray Oct 18 '11 at 9:38
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From your comment:

automatically adds value to the variable (in this case "me") and populating the instantiated object.. ie: having Person.Name = "Joe" and etc... without me manually doing object initialization or what not... basically I want the model/class to create its own data right after I instantiate it..

Just add implementation to the parameterless constructor:

public class Person
{
    public Person()
    {
        this.Name = "Joe";
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

When you call var me = new Person();, then Name will already be populated with "Joe".

More usages of constructors

If you want to be able to customize the name more quickly, then you could add parameters to that constructor, or add a different constructor that takes parameters:

public class Person
{
    public Person()
        : this("Joe") // Calls the other constructor that takes a name...
    {
    }

    public Person(string name)
    {
        this.Name = name;
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

var me = new Person(); // Joe
var you = new Person("You");

In the latest .Net, you can also use default values for these parameters to make your code shorter:

public class Person
{
    public Person(string name = "Joe") // Will be "Joe" unless you say otherwise
    {
        this.Name = name;
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

var me = new Person(); // Joe
var you = new Person("You");
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exactly the right one i was looking for! –  Jan Carlo Viray Oct 18 '11 at 9:49
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you can create a static method (factory)

var seededPerson = Person.CreateNew();

public class Person
{
  private Person() {}

  public static Person CreateNew()
  {
    return new Person() { Seed = 123; };
  }
}
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A constructor initializes the current (newly allocated) instance; nothing more. It cannot return anything. It sounds like you just want a factory method:

public class Person
{
   public static Person Create(){ return ...}
}
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public class Person
{
    protected Person()
    {
    }

    public static Person BuildPerson(out int seed)
    {
        var person = new Person();
        seed = RuntimeHelpers.GetHashCode(person);
        return person;
    }
}

You mean this? Using a "surrogate" constructor based on a static method?

or

public class Person
{
    public Person(out int seed)
    {
        seed = RuntimeHelpers.GetHashCode(this);
    }
}

a constructor with an out argument?

As a sidenote, RuntimeHelpers.GetHashCode(object) returns a pseudo unique id of an object. Pseudo unique because these numbers can be reused by .NET. A better "implementation" that always give unique ids would be:

public class Person
{
    private static int seed;

    public Person(out int seed)
    {
        seed = Interlocked.Increment(ref Person.seed);
    }
}

using the Interlocked.Increment to make the constructor thread safe.

share|improve this answer
    
using a new Random() like that is quite likely to lead to "all my random numbers are the same" issues when allocating in a loop. Just sayin' –  Marc Gravell Oct 18 '11 at 9:36
    
I know... But I don't know what a seed is. And in reality it means "all the Person generated in the next few ms will give the same seed" :-) depending on the precision of DateTime.Now/UtcNow –  xanatos Oct 18 '11 at 9:37
    
@MarcGravell What would you think of the use of RuntimeHelpers.GetHashCode(this)? (remembering that numbers can be reused...)... Is this "letting the this escape the constructor" ok? –  xanatos Oct 18 '11 at 9:43
    
not exactly what I was asking, but those are some interesting points.. I'm definitely going to keep this answer in mind. –  Jan Carlo Viray Oct 18 '11 at 9:48
1  
@xanatos that would probably do the job quite nicely - but then, if the requirement is randomisation, then in many ways it would be better to pass in a randomizer (makes it testable, for starters). An inventive solution, though –  Marc Gravell Oct 18 '11 at 9:49
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