Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have tree tables:

BallId  Color

ball_1  red
ball_2  red
ball_3  blue
ball_4  green
ball_5  green

.......

.

BoxId  Color

box_1  green
box_2  green
box_3  red
.......

.

BoxId  BallId

box_1  ball4
box_1  ball5
box_3  ball2

I want to force color relationship on BoxId,BallId table, is it possible schematically?

share|improve this question
1  
I interpreted this to mean: Can you apply a constraint so that a row can only exist in the third table if the referenced rows in the first two tables have the same colour value? –  Hammerite Oct 18 '11 at 10:43
    
@Hammerite yes, your interpretation is exactly correct. –  metdos Oct 18 '11 at 10:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not quite sure what is your end goal here.

If you are simply trying to ensure that a BoxId and BallId in the bottom table must exist in the top two tables, then you can use FOREIGN KEYs (a.k.a "referential integrity").

--- EDIT ---

Based on other comments/responses, I see that you actually want to ensure that 2 rows that are connected through the third table always have the same color, yet the disconnected rows can still have their own color.

If so, then you can "abuse" keys like this:

Ball:
    BallId PK, AK1
    Color  AK1

Box:
    BoxId  PK, AK1
    Color  AK1

BallInBox
    BallId PK
    BoxId  PK
    Color
    FK (BallId, Color) references Ball
    FK (BoxId, Color) references Box

Here is the actual DDL SQL:

delimiter $$

CREATE TABLE Ball (
  BallId varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  Color varchar(45),
  PRIMARY KEY (BallId),
  UNIQUE KEY Ball_AK1 (BallId, Color)
)$$

CREATE TABLE Box (
  BoxId varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  Color varchar(45),
  PRIMARY KEY (BoxId),
  UNIQUE KEY Box_AK1 (BoxId, Color)
)$$

CREATE TABLE BallInBox (
  BallId varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  BoxId varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  Color varchar(45),
  PRIMARY KEY (BallId, BoxId),
  CONSTRAINT BallInBox_FK1 FOREIGN KEY (BallId, Color) REFERENCES Ball (BallId, Color),
  CONSTRAINT BallInBox_FK2 FOREIGN KEY (BoxId, Color) REFERENCES Box (BoxId, Color)
)$$

BTW, this allows for NULL colors both in "base" tables and in the "connection" table. It is easy to add NOT NULL constraints if that's not what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
No I want to keep ball-color and box-color relationship in the third table. –  metdos Oct 18 '11 at 10:48
    
@metdos I see. Please see the edit in my answer. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Oct 18 '11 at 11:59
    
+1 This is what I'd write. –  ypercube Oct 18 '11 at 12:06
    
+1 this is a good one with extra Color column in BallInBox table. –  metdos Oct 18 '11 at 13:30

One way to do it (although its not strictly 'schematic') is to have an insert trigger on the third table which checks the colours of the ball/box being entered and throws an exception if they're not the same

share|improve this answer

I think the answer to this, in terms of relational theory, is the following: what you're really saying here is that you have a set of boxes and a set of balls, and each ball is in a box. The boxes and balls each have a colour, and a ball can only be in a box of the matching colour. But it's a design error to store the colour of the ball in the balls table. Rather, you should just store which box each ball is in, and then you know what colour the ball is because you can check the colour of the box that it is stored inside (using a join).

So, no, there isn't a constraint you can specify that enforces the relationship you want, but that's because you're going about this the wrong way. You shouldn't have the Color column in the balls table.

EDIT : The above assumes that every ball must be in a box. The OP clarifies that not every ball need be in a box. This seems to be a harder problem, because in that case you can't rely on the boxes table to keep track of what colour a ball is. I can see a few different solutions, none of them perfect.

  1. Go with your original design, and accept that it offers you no simple way to enforce the constraint you have in mind.
  2. Create a new table "unboxed_ball" which stores balls that aren't in a box, and has a "colour" column to record the colour of the ball. Balls that are in boxes are found in the original ball table; balls that are not in boxes are found in this new table. To query all balls, both boxed and unboxed, you need to perform a UNION.
  3. Add "fake boxes" to the box table, one in each colour, that unboxed balls of that colour are deemed to be "inside" (though the box doesn't really exist). This might not be very practical if there are other attributes of a box which this "fake box" wouldn't really have.
share|improve this answer
    
You summarized situation very well, thank you for that. Yeah I'm aware of the design error. But this is the situation: ball-color table is coming from default, I need to maintain that information, a ball doesn't have be in a box. I'm distributing balls dynamically, and when a ball isn't in a box, how should I know its color? –  metdos Oct 18 '11 at 10:46
    
Edited my answer –  Hammerite Oct 18 '11 at 10:55
    
I cannot really see how "it is a design error to store the colour of the ball in the balls table". Where else should one store the entity's attributes other than the Entity's table? –  ypercube Oct 18 '11 at 12:08
    
@Hammerite: And yes, there is a "simple way to enforce the constraint the OP has in mind." See Branko's answer. –  ypercube Oct 18 '11 at 12:10
    
With respect to your first comment - If every ball must be in a box, then colour becomes more properly an attribute of the box than of balls. Therefore if you store the value of the attribute with the ball then you are putting it in the wrong place - it should be in the box table, because it's an attribute of a box. –  Hammerite Oct 18 '11 at 12:44

It is possible to do this via the database using a composite foreign key:

create table ball
(id int unsigned not null primary key auto_increment,
color varchar(10)) engine=InnoDB;

create table box
(id int unsigned not null primary key auto_increment,
color varchar(10)) engine=InnoDB;

create table boxBallRule    
(ballId int unsigned not null,
boxId int unsigned not null,
PRIMARY KEY (ballId,boxId),
CONSTRAINT `boxBallRule_box_fk1` FOREIGN KEY (boxId) references `box` (id),
CONSTRAINT `boxBallRule_ball_fk1` FOREIGN KEY (ballId) references `ball` (id)
) engine=InnoDB;

create table boxBall
(id int unsigned primary key auto_increment not null,
ballId int unsigned not null,
boxId int unsigned not null,
CONSTRAINT `boxBallColorRule_fk1` FOREIGN KEY (ballId,boxId) references boxBallRule(ballId,boxId)
) engine=InnoDB;

You can then store which balls are allowed in which box in the boxBallRule table. Any insert into the boxBall table that does not conform to the 'allowed' box to ball relationship will fail. Hence:

insert into ball (color) values ('red');
insert into ball (color) values ('blue');
insert into ball (color) values ('green');

insert into box (color) values ('red');
insert into box (color) values ('blue');
insert into box (color) values ('green');

insert into boxBallRule (ballId,boxId) values ((select id from ball where color = 'red'),(select id from box where color = 'red'));
insert into boxBallRule (ballId,boxId) values ((select id from ball where color = 'blue'),(select id from box where color = 'blue'));
insert into boxBallRule (ballId,boxId) values ((select id from ball where color = 'green'),(select id from box where color = 'green'));

-- Let's try and put a red ball in a green box. 
-- The DB should not allow us to do this!
insert into boxBall (ballId,boxId) values 
((select id from ball where color = 'red'),
 (select id from box where color = 'green'));

The last statement should fail since it violates the composite foreign key onto the boxBallRule table.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting approach, but you have maintain boxBallRule, every time you insert a ball or a box, you should insert new lines to boxBallRule. –  metdos Oct 18 '11 at 11:00
    
that's true. I wasn't sure how static/dynamic your balls and boxes were. Another alternative is to set up a before trigger on the boxBall table that compares the color of the box and the ball that you're inserting into the boxBall table and throws an error if the colors do not match. That would work too. –  Tom Mac Oct 18 '11 at 11:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.