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I am working with C++ and QT and have a problem with german umlauts. I have a QString like "wir sind müde" and want to change it to "wir sind müde" in order to show it correctly in a QTextBrowser.

I tried to do it like this:

s = s.replace( QChar('ü'), QString("ü"));

But it does not work.

Also

 s = s.replace( QChar('\u00fc'), QString("ü"))

does not work.

When I iterate through all characters of the string in a loop, the 'ü' are two characters.

Can anybody help me?

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1  
Actually, what's is the difference in your strings before and after replacing? "wir sind müde" and "wir sind müde" –  Sai Kalyan Kumar Akshinthala Oct 18 '11 at 11:02
1  
I corrected it to "wir sind m'&uuml';de" (without ' '). The site convertet it to ü because it's the html representation for ü. –  punkyduck Oct 18 '11 at 11:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

QStrings are UTF-16.

QString stores a string of 16-bit QChars, where each QChar corresponds one Unicode 4.0 character. (Unicode characters with code values above 65535 are stored using surrogate pairs, i.e., two consecutive QChars.)

So try

//if ü is utf-16, see your fileencoding to know this
s.replace("ü", "ü")

//if ü if you are inputting it from an editor in latin1 mode
s.replace(QString::fromLatin1("ü"), "ü");
s.replace(QString::fromUtf8("ü"), "ü"); //there are a bunch of others, just make sure to select the correct one
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Thank you! s.replace(QString::fromLatin1("ü"), "ü"); works. –  punkyduck Oct 18 '11 at 11:31

There are two different representations of ü in Unicode:

  • The single point 00FC (LATIN SMALL LETTER U WITH DIAERESIS)
  • The sequence 0075 (LATIN SMALL LETTER U) 0308 (COMBINING DIAERESIS)

You should check for both.

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No need to. Internally it is stored as two distinct code points. See the quote on my post. "Stored as surrogate pairs" –  RedX Oct 18 '11 at 11:43
    
@RedX: that refers to code points above 65535, which doesn't apply here. The documentation doesn't specify how accented characters are represented - presumably, that will depend on how the string was generated. –  Mike Seymour Oct 18 '11 at 11:50
    
You are right. If he were unsure, he could get a normalized version with normalize(). –  RedX Oct 18 '11 at 11:54

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