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Please consider the following example:

#include <string>
#include <vector>

using std::string;
using std::vector;

template <typename T>
const T GetValue()
{
    return T(); // some value
}

template <typename T>
const vector<T> GetValue()
{
    return vector<T>(); // some vector of values
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int i = GetValue<int>();
    vector<int> = GetValue<vector<int>>();
    return 0;
}

I have two template functions which are supposed to parse values from some storage depending on an given type. The first should do the job for simple data types, the second for vectors of simple data types only. My problem is that the template matching is ambiguous since T may be vector<T>. I wonder how to implement the overload/specialization for the vector types properly.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
Thanks to all for the contributions! – raines Oct 18 '11 at 11:48
up vote 6 down vote accepted

One simple way is to use an out-param, so that the template parameter can be deduced from the argument:

#include <vector>
using std::vector;

template <typename T>
void GetValue(T &t)
{
    t = T(); // some value
}

template <typename T>
void GetValue(vector<T> &v)
{
    v = vector<T>(); // some vector of values
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int i;
    GetValue(i);
    vector<int> v;
    GetValue(v);
    return 0;
}

GetValue(v) isn't ambiguous, since the template argument deduction rules say that the second overload is the better match.

This isn't necessarily the interface/style you want, though, in which case you could use partial specialization instead of overloading. But that requires a class, since function templates cannot be partially specialized:

#include <vector>
using std::vector;

template <typename T>
struct Getter {
    T get(void) {
        return T(); // some value
    }
};

template <typename T>
struct Getter<vector<T> > {
    vector<T> get(void) {
        return vector<T>(); // some vector of values
    }
};

template <typename T>
T GetValue(void)
{
    return Getter<T>().get();
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int i = GetValue<int>();
    vector<int> v = GetValue<vector<int> >();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this one, but one thing is left: Is there a reason why function templates cannot be partially specialized? – raines Oct 18 '11 at 11:38
    
@raines: there's no fundamental reason other than "because the standard says so", but the rationale is: (1) function template specializations lead to name resolution that's a bit counter-intuitive, and partial specializations would add to the confusion; (2) you can use either overloading or this trick instead, so they aren't necessary. See gotw.ca/publications/mill17.htm – Steve Jessop Oct 18 '11 at 11:56
    
+1 for the explaining the difference between this and my solution. – Nawaz Oct 18 '11 at 13:33

Both version ofGetValue differs by only return type, hence it is not overload.

I would suggest you to have just one GetValue and then implement two functions which differ by parameter type, as opposed to return type, and forward the call as:

namespace details
{
       template <typename T>
       T  FillValue(T*)
       {
          //your code
       }

       template <typename T>
       vector<T> FillValue(vector<T> *)
       {
           //your code 
       }
}

template <typename T>
T GetValue()
{
    return details::FillValue((T*)0); //pass null pointer of type T*
}

The correct FillValue will be selected by the compiler based on the type of the argument passed to the function, which is T*. If T is vector<U> for some type U, then the second function will be selected, otherwise the first function will be selected.

share|improve this answer
    
Provided that T has an accessible default constructor, which of course int and vector<int> both do. – Steve Jessop Oct 18 '11 at 11:34
    
@SteveJessop: OP has used that. My solution is almost same as yours. – Nawaz Oct 18 '11 at 11:40
    
true, OP has used that, but only in code that's filling in for real code. If "some value" and/or "some vector of values" aren't intended to be changed in future, then there's no point treating T and vector<T> differently in the first place. So I reject the hypothesis that those lines actually appear in the questioner's real code :-) – Steve Jessop Oct 18 '11 at 11:54
    
@SteveJessop: I didn't understand the reason of your disagreement, especially when I see the same lines in your answer as well. :| – Nawaz Oct 18 '11 at 12:35
    
in my answer, they're also filling in for real code. Suppose we want to implement GetValue for a type T that has no default constructor. In the second part of my answer, we add another class template specialization, replacing the "some value" code with something that uses a different constructor. In your answer, we're stuck, because your line T t = T(); is completely generic. It cannot be replaced for particular types T. – Steve Jessop Oct 18 '11 at 12:38

Put the general method inside a class (naming as GetValue preferably) and declare that method as operator T(). Now specialize the class for vector<T>:

template <typename T>
struct GetValue
{
  operator const T () const
  {
    std::cout<<"GetValue()\n";
    return T(); // some value
  }
};

template <typename T>
struct GetValue<vector<T> >
{
  operator const vector<T> ()
  {
    std::cout<<"GetValue<vector<T>>()\n";
    return vector<T>(); // some vector of values
  }
};

Usage:

int i = GetValue<int>();
vector<int> v = GetValue<vector<int> >();

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
Pretty cool too :-) – raines Oct 18 '11 at 11:46
    
One slight disadvantage of this is that if I write a class with an implicit int constructor, then I can't write MyClass mc = GetValue<int>();. I can still cast, of course, or embark upon the most-vexing-parse-avoiding course of writing MyClass mc((GetValue<int>()));. Same issue comes with functions that take MyClass, the argument can't be GetValue<int>(). But that's a fundamental issue of C++, really, that you can't fully imitate a built-in type. So you could just regard the fact that iammilind has done this this as one of the reasons not to use implicit constructors. – Steve Jessop Oct 18 '11 at 12:07

You can move the partial specialization to a helper class:

#include <vector>

template <typename T>
class Creator {
public:
    T operator()() const { return T(); }
};

template <typename T>
class Creator<std::vector<T> > {
public:
    std::vector<T> operator()() const { return std::vector<T>(); }
};

template <typename T>
T GetValue() {
    return Creator<T>()();
}

int main() {
    int i = GetValue<int>();
    std::vector<char> v = GetValue<std::vector<char> >();
}
share|improve this answer

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